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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: phys.org

IDC reported an 8.5 percent drop in global tablet shipments to 36.2 million. This was the 10th straight quarterly decline for tablets, IDC said. A separate survey by Strategy Analytics pegged the decline for the quarter at 10 percent. IDC analyst Ryan Reith said the sizzling growth in tablets from 2010 to 2013 following the launch of the first iPad is now history, and that many consumers are finding they can do without tablets, relying instead on smartphone or new slimmer laptop PCs. "The rate at which the tablet market grew from 2010 to 2013 was unlike many other consumer-oriented device markets we've seen before," Reith said. "However, it appears for many reasons consumers became less eager to refresh these devices, or in some instances purchase them at all. We continue to believe the leading driver for this was the increased dependency on smartphones, along with rather minimal technology and form factor progression." IDC said Apple led the market with a 24.6 percent share in first quarter despite a 13 percent sales drop. Samsung sales fell 1.1 percent but retained the number two spot at 16.5 percent. China's Huawei was the only major vendor to show growth—reporting a 31.7 percent jump, garnering a 7.4 percent share, after introducing new "detachable" tablets powered by Microsoft Windows, IDC said. IDC estimated that Amazon, which does not report detailed sales figures, sold 2.2 million tablets for a six percent market share, a drop of 1.8 percent. Lenovo held the number five spot with a market share of 5.7 percent for the Chinese electronics giant, according to IDC. Strategy Analytics, which reported similar market shares, said the growth had evaporated for Microsoft and its Surface tablets after a number of strong quarters. "Sales performance for Windows tablets has been fantastic over the last several years but the hero of this segment is missing in action," said Eric Smith of Strategy Analytics. The Strategy Analytics survey found that sales of Windows tablets, which include Microsoft Surface devices, fell two percent from a year ago to 6.3 million units, which gave the operating system a market share of 15 percent. Explore further: Apple keeps lead in slumping tablet market


News Article | March 24, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The iPhone 6s may be an old warhorse, but that hasn't stopped the smartphone from becoming consumers' most favored handset. According to a report from the IHS Markit, the Apple smartphone has emerged the best-selling handset for 2016. "In terms of shipments, the iPhone 6s from Apple bested all competitors for sales in 2016, according to new analysis from IHS Markit," noted the report. The report based its findings on the research from the IHS Markit Smartphone Shipment Database. This database keeps track of quarterly shipments for over 350 smartphone models. On the basis of shipments, the iPhone 6s routed even sibling iPhone 7 in sales and took home the top honors. The Q4 2016 figures, however, tell a different story as in this period, the world's iPhone 7 was the best-selling smartphone, followed by the iPhone 7 Plus. IHS Markit did not divulge the shipment estimates for 2016, but the chart reflects that the iPhone 6s accounted for 60 million shipments. According to analysts, the iPhone 6s performed better than its contemporaries largely due its top-end features and specs. "The iPhone 6s is wildly popular in dozens of countries globally, due to its attractive hardware design blended with rich features such as 4K video, large multi-touch display, and fingerprint security," said Neil Mawston Executive Director at the Strategy Analytics. The top four spots in the list of the most sold smartphones in 2016 went to Apple courtesy its iPhone 6s, iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, and iPhone 6s Plus. This means that Apple easily managed to rout rival Samsung, which made it to the top five thanks to its Galaxy S7 edge. Samsung's Galaxy S7 edge was not the only handset from the company to make it to the list. The company's Galaxy S7 was the ninth-best in the rankings. While Samsung may have been outpaced by Apple, a silver lining for the company is that the two smartphones performed better than their predecessors Galaxy S6 edge and Galaxy S6. The gross and combined shipment of the Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 edge was 10 million higher than that of its predecessors in the same period. Samsung shipped roughly 25 million units each of the 2016 models of the Galaxy J3, Galaxy J5, Galaxy J7, and Galaxy S7. The Oppo A53 also made it to the list of the best-selling smartphones for 2016. It was ranked seventh and was the only non-Samsung or non-Apple device in the list. However, Huawei, which is the third biggest smartphone maker in the world, did not make it to the list. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

Last week, a smirking, overeager guy in a Burger King polo and hat appeared on TV and managed to hijack countless Google Home speakers in a matter of seconds. "You're watching a 15-second Burger King ad, which is unfortunately not enough time to explain all the fresh ingredients in the Whopper sandwich. But I got an idea," he said, waving at the camera to come closer. "OK Google, what is the Whopper burger?" Anyone watching the spot who had a Google Home within shouting distance heard the speaker regurgitate part of the Wikipedia entry for the Whopper. Some viewers found the ad brilliant or funny, others described it as intrusive and annoying. Regardless of your proclivities for flame-grilled meats, the spot -- watched 3.8 million times on YouTube to date -- provides an early, gimmicky example of what commercials using smart speakers will look like. This is just the start. Ad executives say they plan to roll out more advertising for smart speakers and their voice assistants in the near future. They're hoping to take advantage of a rare new channel for ads that sits in the home and can speak directly to millions of Google Home and Amazon Echo owners. "All our clients sense something's going on," said Jason Hartley, head of search and paid social at advertising firm 360i. "Ideas are bubbling underneath the surface, but we are in a gimmicky phase until we discover more utility for how users are using these devices." Colleen Leddy, head of communications strategy at Droga5, said her agency is "pipelining" concepts and went to a Google Home hackathon. She said ads for smart speakers from her firm are coming "fairly soon." Sounds miserable, right? After all, who likes the idea of more ads? Cramming them into smart speakers could mess up the whole experience just as these devices are starting to take root. Amazon, Google and advertisers will have to tread lightly (or maybe that's asking too much and they'll keep trolling us like BK did). Let's be clear: This is an area that the ad industry won't be able to resist. Early adopters of smart home devices like the Home and Echo tend to be tech-focused and wealthier, a highly desirable audience for brands. Also, the number of people to pitch is growing fast, with an estimated 1.8 million smart speakers sold last year and 15.1 million expected yearly sales by 2020, according to researcher Strategy Analytics. If advertisers can find ways of reaching these folks, without being bothersome, they could see big benefits. The early ads on smart speakers have been unremarkable or annoying. Last month, Google Home users noticed their devices sneaking in an ad for the movie "Beauty and the Beast" when folks simply asked, "OK Google, what's my day like?" In response to user questions, Google refused to call it a commercial -- which sounds laughable -- instead saying it wanted to "call out timely content." Also in March, Anheuser-Busch released its first skill for the Amazon Echo and its voice assistant Alexa, providing workout routines branded with its low-calorie Michelob Ultra beer. That may make sense for a beer targeted at health-conscious adults, but it seems odd to offer fitness routines available only to people over 21. There are a few similar concepts, which could be called "branded skills," such as Good Housekeeping's Alexa command that offers tips on removing stains ("Alexa, ask Good Housekeeping how do I get ink out of fabric") and Patrón's skill for making cocktails (preferably with Patrón spirits). To be fair, plenty of news publishers, including CNET, offer news briefs through Alexa, and one might argue they, too, work as forms of advertising. In its policies, Amazon says it's fairly restrictive when it comes to ads on the Echo. But, the company has clearly shown it's OK with these handful of branded skills that work to be informative. You can also voice shop using the Echo or Home, so there are plenty of brand names thrown around in that context. But those don't count as commercials -- right? Mindful of the Burger King ad, an Amazon spokesperson said the company alters "our own Alexa advertisements to minimize Echo devices falsely responding in customers' homes." Google and Burger King, which didn't work together on the BK ad, didn't respond to requests for comment. Industry experts suggest future ads on these voice-activated speakers could become sponsored spots (e.g., the weather brought to you by The Weather Channel) or product placements (e.g., make this recipe with Goya black beans). Perhaps a query about the daily commute could include a coupon for a Starbucks located on the way to work, one expert suggested. "We're so early today that there's no evidence to suggest one solution will work better than another," said Mike Bloxham, senior vice president at ad consultancy Frank N. Magid. These experts widely panned the Burger King spot for interrupting people's days and taking control of their devices, kind of like an old-school pop-up ad online. "It felt a little bit like we were going a bit backwards," Leddy said. Since smart speakers are so driven by users' requests, future ads that succeed on these devices may become so subtle and benign that they don't come off as ads at all, the experts suggested. Instead, these paid spots will provide you with the information you need when you ask for it, not unlike a well-targeted search ad on Google. "If you can just show up when they ask," 360i's Hartley said, "that's a pretty powerful moment for your brand." One thing these folks broadly agreed on was commercials on smart speakers won't, or at least shouldn't, become 15- to 30-second radio-like commercials that could get shoved in ahead of an answer. "Just let me know how much to pay to not let that happen," said Karsten Weide, an ad industry analyst for researcher IDC, "because that would be super annoying." CNET en Español: Get all your tech news and reviews in Spanish. Tech Enabled: CNET chronicles tech's role in providing new kinds of accessibility.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.techrepublic.com

Apple's newest video app Clips, released in early April, makes it easy for professionals to create mobile videos with transcribed text and effects. Clips was created with social media in mind, and it could help social media experts and marketers more readily generate video content for their brands. Videos can be captured within the Clips app, or users can import existing video clips or photos from their device's library. Using the pinch and drag functionality that iOS is known for, users can add a zoom or panning effect for a little bit of flair. Live Titles, which automatically transcribes text on the screen while you speak, is the core feature for professionals in Clips. Using Live Titles, businesses could easily create product demonstrations, or how-to videos, as well as creating video that can be watched in an office setting with the sound off. Once the text has been transcribed, users can alter the text and punctuation, and choose different display styles for the text itself. SEE: Apple Clips is a great free video app, once you learn its tricks (CNET) Mobile video is booming, with a Strategy Analytics report projecting the market to hit $25 billion by 2021. In addition to video-focused sites like YouTube, video is growing on social media platforms, and Clips makes it easy to share videos on Facebook, Instagram, and Vimeo. A recent Cisco report said that mobile video will will represent 78% of all mobile traffic by 2021, and a big portion of its growth will be driven by live video. There isn't a capability for live video in Clips just yet, but it is still a great tool for professionals to utilize. Of course, there are filters, emoji, and animated graphics that can be added to your videos as well. Apple also provides music backing tracks, which the Clips webpage said will automatically adjust to fit the length of your video. One other feature that professionals shouldn't let fly under the radar is the changes to the iOS Share Sheet in Clips. As noted on our sister site, ZDNet, Clips has streamlined the Share Sheet, making it much easier to share content with frequent contacts. If Apple decides to roll out the changes to all of iOS, it could provide more capacity for productivity among enterprise iOS users. One of the best parts of Apple Clips is the price point: Free. The app only makes Instagram-esque square videos for now, and some of the editing features aren't as robust as some would like, but it's a great to help businesses ride the growth of mobile video.


The desire for users to complete everyday tasks and functions using AI is high. But current AI solutions often fall short of expectations due to limitations in capability and functionality. "Effective learning is critical to creating a compelling experience in this way," commented Christopher Dodge, Associate Director and report author. "Many AI solutions require too much upfront action from the user; manually inputting data or linking profiles from different apps to ensure inclusion in one service is time-consuming and clumsy." Correctly identifying an individual within one ecosystem also impacts basic tasks, especially if the solution cannot identify the individual requesting the action. For example, one user selecting music which is then played on another family member's phone is extremely frustrating for both the user and the recipient. Added Chris Schreiner, Director of Syndicated Research, UXIP, "Effective learning in AI requires greater access to a user's personal information as well as improved user profiling of shared AI resources. The ability to learn by error will also make a significant difference to the user experience of these devices. Without these elements, AI will be considered less than 'intelligent'." Strategy Analytics, Inc. provides the competitive edge with advisory services, consulting and actionable market intelligence for emerging technology, mobile and wireless, digital consumer and automotive electronics companies. With offices in North America, Europe and Asia, Strategy Analytics delivers insights for enterprise success. www.StrategyAnalytics.com. Analyzing UX innovation opportunities in wireless, smart home, and other emerging technologies, UXS forms part of the User Experience Innovation Practice (UXIP) at Strategy Analytics. Focusing on user behaviors, motivations and interests across multiple consumer verticals, UXIP helps clients meet consumer needs, develop usable solutions and deliver compelling user experiences through both syndicated and proprietary research capabilities. With our extensive expertise in large-scale survey work, in-depth interviews, focus groups and observational sessions, UXIP's research methodologies allow strategic user-centric analysis on the potential for new technologies. Providing actionable insight, go-to-market strategies and business recommendations, UXIP is a leading supplier of consumer knowledge to the technology industry. Click here for more information. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/effective-learning-critical-to-compelling-experience-of-artificial-intelligence-says-strategy-analytics-300463086.html


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.cnet.com

The Hilton Union Square Hotel in San Francisco was busier than normal as people hustled to grab boxed sandwich lunches. The food was provided by Samsung, which played host to a developer conference last week to promote its homegrown Tizen operating system. With a turkey sandwich in hand, I struck up a conversation with a photographer who has never made a Tizen app. "I was hoping to learn how to use the Gear 360 in photography," said Rosswell Liongson, who found out about the event at the Samsung section of a Bay Area Best Buy store. Unfortunately for Liongson, the 360 camera wasn't a topic at the Tizen conference, held the same time as Google's popular I/O developer conference. It only works with Samsung's high-end Android phones and, soon, Apple's iPhones (but, notably, not Tizen). The second person I met was an IT worker who dabbled in app development on the side. He tried making a Tizen smartwatch app once but said he probably won't work with the software again. Then there was the conference sponsor whose technology acts as a smart home remote via iPhones or Android devices -- but not Tizen. Another IT worker said he had no plans to make Tizen apps but wanted to learn more about what Samsung's up to. The interactions I had underscored the perennial problem Samsung faces as it pushes its own software. It's hard to get people excited about yet another operating system, particularly when it comes to mobile. After fits and starts, Tizen has finally found a niche in powering Samsung's internet-connected home appliances and TVs, as well as its Gear smartwatches. But for the lifeblood of any platform -- developers -- Tizen is largely still a non-entity. That's a particular problem when it comes to mobile. "There's no need for another mobile operating system and basically no chance of success for another mobile operating system," Global Data analyst Avi Greengart said. "If I've got an OS, I'm going to find other markets for it." But, this is Samsung we're talking about. If anyone can make it work, it's the world's largest phone maker, right? The company declined to make any executives available for interview at the developer conference. It said more than 1,000 people -- developers, service and content partners -- attended the event, and "the majority" were developers. Android, iOS and Windows may be household names, but you'd be forgiven if you've never even heard of Tizen. This year's Tizen Developer Conference marked the fifth annual gathering (yep, there's already been five). Walking around the Hilton ballrooms, it was clear many of the attendees were Samsung employees. It wasn't always that way. The first such gathering, in 2012 in San Francisco, marked the introduction of Tizen 1.0 as an open-source project. The real launch came in February 2013 when a group of heavy-hitting companies, led by Samsung, held a splashy party at the Mobile World Congress tradeshow in Barcelona. Attendees snacked on freshly shucked oysters and made-to-order crepes as they learned how Samsung and its lead development partner, Intel, planned to upend the mobile market. On display were several prototype phones running Tizen. At that time, Apple's iOS and Google's Android dominated the phone world, but it wasn't too farfetched to think there could be a strong third player. Microsoft tried. So did BlackBerry and Mozilla. All failed. "The phone is highly dependent on apps," Creative Strategies analyst Carolina Milanesi said. "Look at how well Microsoft [and others] learned that lesson." But Tizen had other big wireless providers on board, like Sprint, Vodafone, Japan's NTT Docomo and France's Orange. Kiyohito Nagata, managing director of strategic marketing for NTT DoCoMo and then-chairman of the Tizen Association, hailed the launch event as "the basement of the future success of the Tizen OS and ecosystem." Eventually, the carriers all ditched their plans for Tizen phones. Rather than pushing out a flashy, high-end phone, Samsung instead targeted emerging markets with a cheap device. Its first Tizen phone, the Samsung Z, was slated for release in late 2014 in Russia; instead, the company delayed it indefinitely. The company eventually introduced the Samsung Z1 in India in 2015 for less than $100. It expanded to other Southwest Asian countries that year and moved into Africa and Southeast Asia -- South Africa, Kenya, Nigeria, Ghana and Indonesia -- in 2016. This year, it will launch Tizen phones across the entire continent of Africa as well as Middle Eastern and Latin American countries such as Iran, Egypt, Pakistan, Bolivia and Peru. Last week, Samsung introduced the Z4, its latest budget Tizen phone. It also boasted at the developer confab that Tizen phone sales jumped 30 percent globally from 2015 to 2016 and will more than double in 2017. "We're expecting continuous but even faster growth in the future," Hokyu Choi, director and head of the Tizen mobile business at Samsung, said during a keynote at the Tizen Developer Conference. He added that, eventually, Samsung's Tizen phones "will be available to all countries in the world." Still, it will be tough going. Even though Samsung has talked up the success of Tizen, CounterPoint Research analyst Neil Shah estimated Samsung sold 1 million Tizen phones in India, the software's first and biggest market. That's a big number until you consider it's less than 3 percent of the total number of smartphones the company sold in that country, and less than 1 percent of the total smartphones in India shipped by all handset makers, he said. Overall, Samsung last year shipped 309.4 million smartphones globally, according to Strategy Analytics. It remained the world's biggest phone maker -- with 21 percent of the market -- despite the Galaxy Note 7 fiasco hurting its sales. In 2013, JK Shin, the head of Samsung's mobile business at the time, said the company wanted Tizen to be on everything. Samsung's nearly reached that goal, with its TVs, appliances and wearables using the software. Despite Samsung's ambitions for Tizen smartphones, it's all the other connected devices where it has a better chance, analysts say. Take smartwatches. Samsung's first device, the Galaxy Gear from late 2013, initially ran Android, but Samsung updated the software to Tizen in May 2014. Ever since then, virtually all of Samsung's smartwatches run Tizen. In the first quarter of 2017, Tizen leapfrogged Google's Android Wear software to become the second biggest operating system for smartwatches with 19 percent market share, according to Strategy Analytics. Apple, with its watchOS, had 57 percent of the market. "It makes sense for Samsung to say, 'Use Android where it does best,' but Tizen has a really useful role to play in wearables and other places where Android has fallen short," Jackdaw Research analyst Jan Dawson said. In 2015, Tizen made its way to Samsung's smart TV lineup. It's also now in smart home appliances, like the Family Hub Refrigerator. It's those products where Samsung has an edge -- it's the world's biggest TV maker and the largest home appliance vendor in the US. Google and Apple don't have the same presence in larger electronics. Google didn't have a comment for this report. The day after my turkey sandwich lunch, I was back in the Hilton ballroom to meet with Glympse CEO Bryan Trussel. The location-sharing app is one developer that's supported Tizen nearly from the beginning. It has built apps for Samsung's smartwatches and at CES in January unveiled an app for Samsung's Family Hub 2.0 refrigerator. During the developer conference last week, Glympse said it had developed an app for Samsung's smart TVs that let you see the location of family members -- or even your cable provider -- right on the television's display. Trussel walked me over to Samsung's flashy -- and pricey -- refrigerator to show me how I could track my Pizza Hut delivery on the appliance's screen or see when my loved ones would get home. Then he showed me the same features on a large Samsung smart TV. "The goal is anywhere, any device, any time," Trussel said of the Glympse app. Next up for Glympse and its Samsung partnership could be an actual Tizen phone app. The two companies are in talks about that now, Trussel said, and it's likely Glympse will have an app for Samsung's Tizen phones later this year. "Looking back, [betting on Tizen] was a risk that we're glad we took," he said. Now Samsung just needs to hope Glympse is not alone. Virtual reality 101: CNET tells you everything you need to know about VR. CNET Magazine: Check out a sample of the stories in CNET's newsstand edition.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

Apple has bought Finnish sleep tracking firm Beddit to boost its health and fitness services, as it attempts to secure its place in the “quantified self” market. Beddit, which was founded in 2007 and has been selling its sleep tracker in Apple stores since 2015, confirmed the acquisition with an updated privacy policy. The update revised on 8 May said: “Beddit has been acquired by Apple. Your personal data will be collected, used and disclosed in accordance with the Apple privacy policy.” Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but Beddit had raised $3.5m (£2.7m) in funding since it was founded. The £130 Beddit sleep tracker consists of a 1.5mm thick strip of sensors that are placed on ttop of the mattress and connected to a wall outlet for power. Combined with an Android or iPhone app, the Beddit 3 sleep sensor tracks sleep time and quality, heart rate, breathing rate and snoring. It also acts as an intelligent alarm clock that wakes you up in the lightest sleep phase. The Espoo-based company partnered with fitness tracking firm Misfit in 2014 to create the co-branded Misfit Beddit, before Misfit and its Shine fitness tracker were acquired by watchmaker Fossil group for $260m in November 2015. Beddit has been described as the “Fitbit of sleep” for its easy to use sensor and comprehensive night-time tracking and analytics, an area that Apple is weak. To date Apple has not featured sleep tracking at all within its iPhone or Apple Watch fitness apps. Third-party sleep tracking apps, including Beddit, have filled the gap using the iPhone, but with its requirement of a nightly charge, sleep has remained the Achilles heel of the Apple Watch’s otherwise fairly comprehensive health-tracking tools. Apple, which has become the first company to top the $800bn mark in market capitalisation, has found itself in a battle with San Francisco-based Fitbit for not only the top smartwatch, but also the top wearable device. Until recently, Fitbit was the market leader in wearable device sales, but according to data from Strategy Analytics, Apple has overtaken Fitbit to become the world’s largest wearable device manufacturer, shipping 3.5m Apple Watches and holding 16% of the global market in the first quarter of 2017, a figure up 59% year-on-year. Apple was closely followed by China’s Xiaomi with 3.4m wearables shipped and 15% of the market, while Fitbit slumped to third with just 2.9m wearable devices and 13% of the market, down 36% year-on-year. With wearable device shipments growing by 21% to 22m units in Quarter 1 2017, it is a market Apple could use to contribute a meaningful sum to its bottom line, which is currently dominated by a single product – the iPhone – that has seen declining sales. While the initial focus for smartwatches, including Google’s Android Wear watches and the Apple Watch, was around apps and notifications, it quickly became apparent that health and fitness was a driving reason that customers bought the items. For Apple and any other smartwatch makers, comprehensive fitness and health tracking is essential. Sleep tracking has remained the domain of fitness trackers such as the Beddit, or wrist-worn devices such as the Fitbit Charge, which do not need charging each night to last through the day. Whether Apple will continue to sell the Beddit sleep sensor remains to be seen. It is likely the technology and sleep analysis behind it will end up in future Apple products, including the Apple Watch.


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--According to the latest research from Strategy Analytics, Apple iPhone 7 was the world’s best-selling smartphone model in the first quarter of 2017. OPPO R9s was the star performer, shipping 9 million units globally and becoming the world’s third most popular smartphone model. Neil Mawston, Executive Director at Strategy Analytics, said, “Global smartphone shipments reached a robust 353.3 million units in Q1 2017. The top-five most popular models together accounted for 1 in 6 of all smartphones shipped worldwide during the quarter.” Juha Winter, Senior Analyst at Strategy Analytics, added, “We estimate Apple iPhone 7 shipped 21.5 million units and captured 6 percent marketshare worldwide in Q1 2017. The iPhone 7 is by far the world’s most popular smartphone model, due to a compelling blend of user-friendly design, extensive supporting apps, and widespread retail availability for the device. Apple iPhone 7 Plus, with its bigger screen and higher pricing, shipped 17.4 million units for second place and 5 percent marketshare worldwide in Q1 2017. Apple today accounts for two of the world’s top five smartphone models.” Neil Mawston, Executive Director at Strategy Analytics, added, “OPPO R9s shipped 8.9 million units for third place and 3 percent marketshare worldwide in Q1 2017. OPPO is largely unknown in the Western world, but its brand is wildly popular in China and growing rapidly across India. The R9s is OPPO’s flagship 4G device with key features such as dual-SIM connectivity and fingerprint security.” Linda Sui, Director at Strategy Analytics, added, “Samsung was still gearing up for the launch of its new Galaxy S8 portfolio, but managed to get two models in the top five during Q1 2017. The Galaxy J3 captured 2 percent global smartphone marketshare and fourth place, while Galaxy J5 took 1 percent global share to become the world’s fifth most popular model. Samsung’s J3 and J5 are midrange devices that sell very well across Europe and Asia and they helped to offset Samsung’s troubles with the Note 7 battery fiasco in the quarter.” The full report, What are the World’s Top 10 Smartphone Models?, is published by the Strategy Analytics Smartphone Model Tracker (SMT) service, details of which can be found here: http://tinyurl.com/kjt96sg. About Strategy Analytics: Strategy Analytics is a global, independent research and consulting firm. The company is headquartered in Boston, USA, with offices in the UK, France, Germany, Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, India and China. Visit www.strategyanalytics.com for more information.


Artificial Intelligence has the potential to become the operating system of a consumer's life, running quietly in the background helping to make a user's life more convenient, personalized, and enriched. But to ensure seamless integration, all systems within one ecosystem must be able to communicate with each other, regardless of brand. Key findings include: Christopher Dodge, Associate Director and report author commented, "Fragmentation results in users having to devote extensive time to manage different devices and profiles. Consumers are frustrated by trying to remember which tasks a phone assistant can do versus an in-home assistant, versus voice recognition capabilities in a car; and all require different command language." Chris Schreiner, Director of Syndicated Research, UXIP added, "Consumers want the same level of intelligence to be imbedded in all the devices they are using. This way, AI could function much faster; and if the internet is down or slows, usage is not impacted." Strategy Analytics, Inc. provides the competitive edge with advisory services, consulting and actionable market intelligence for emerging technology, mobile and wireless, digital consumer and automotive electronics companies. With offices in North America, Europe and Asia, Strategy Analytics delivers insights for enterprise success. www.StrategyAnalytics.com. Analyzing UX innovation opportunities in wireless, smart home, and other emerging technologies, UXS forms part of the User Experience Innovation Practice (UXIP) at Strategy Analytics. Focusing on user behaviors, motivations and interests across multiple consumer verticals, UXIP helps clients meet consumer needs, develop usable solutions and deliver compelling user experiences through both syndicated and proprietary research capabilities. With our extensive expertise in large-scale survey work, in-depth interviews, focus groups and observational sessions, UXIP's research methodologies allow strategic user-centric analysis on the potential for new technologies. Providing actionable insight, go-to-market strategies and business recommendations, UXIP is a leading supplier of consumer knowledge to the technology industry. Click here for more information. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fragmentation-in-artificial-intelligence-hinders-consumer-engagement-finds-strategy-analytics-300455190.html


News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

Thanks to devices like the Samsung Gear S3, Tizen is now the second-most popular smartwatch out there, with only the watchOS on board the Apple Watch ahead of it. That's according to a new report from Strategy Analytics. Samsung began phasing out Android Wear on its wrist computers back in 2015, pushing ahead with Tizen instead - an OS that has also found its way to the occasional low-end smartphone and Samsung's range of smart TVs. At the time it seemed to have little chance of usurping Android in any category, but Google's smartwatch OS has now slumped to third place in the market, despite a slew of new devices running Android Wear 2.0 launching this year. Tizen's share of the smartwatch market now stands at 19 percent, Tizen Experts reports, with Android Wear at 18 percent and Apple's watchOS at 57 percent. Tizen watches work with both Android and iOS phones, as does Android Wear, to an extent. It's perhaps a testament to the quality of the smartwatches (and fitness trackers) that Samsung has been churning out as well as a sign of the way Android Wear has languished over the last 12 months. Google's recent major smartwatch OS update only recently rolled out, having been announced at last year's Google I/O. More market share of course means a potentially bigger audience for developers, so we might see more app makers embracing Tizen with wrist widgets and add-ons. As for Google and Android Wear, it's got a battle on its hands (or wrists).

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