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News Article | May 11, 2017
Site: www.techradar.com

If you want to hear Daenerys Targaryen’s dragons fly realistically overhead, expertly track unseen Bokoblin in Hyrule or enjoy trouser-flapping road racing with Vin Diesel’s Furious crew, then you need a full-blown home cinema system. Soundbars are all well and good, but when it comes to indulging in genuinely immersive audio then a multichannel home theatre receiver is the real deal. To be honest, AV receivers (AVRs) have an onerous reputation for complexity, a consequence of their do-everything nature and decades of design complacency. Thankfully they’re now a lot easier to live with, courtesy of graphical interfaces actually designed for humans (take a bow Denon) and inclusive usability. Virtually all AV receivers support integrated music services (Spotify, Tidal, Deezer etc), either directly or via an app. Wi-Fi and Bluetooth have become common features, while integrated Apple Airplay and Chromecast, as found on the Onkyo TX-NR676E  and the Pioneer VSX-LS302, simplify streaming even further. If you’re looking to upgrade a long serving AV amplifier, or jump into the glitzy world of home cinema for the first time, here’s everything you need to know… Let’s state the obvious. AV receivers aren’t pretty. As a breed, they’re large and imposing. But size doesn’t have to be a pre-requisite. You can now buy slimline models which slot sensibly into regular AV furniture racks. These tend to be just as well-specified as their larger stablemates, but lack a certain amount of muscle. Marantz has the half-height line, currently led by the NR1607. It may only be 100mm tall, but the specification is far from thin. This 7.2 channel Dolby Atmos and DTS:X (more on which later) receiver supports Hi-Res Audio sources and has a power output rated at 50W per channel (into 8 Ohms). Pioneer offers the even slimmer VSX-S520D. This 5.1 channel cutie is just 70mm tall, offers 4K compatibility and has a DAB tuner. It’s rated at 6x80W RMS into 4 Ohms. If you want to prioritize clout over cosmetics, opt for a full-height AV receiver, and you’ll (at least) double your output power. Volume isn’t just about loudness. The easier it is for an AV receiver to reach a comfortable cinematic listening level, the less fatiguing it will sound. The most powerful AVRs handle fast, dynamic transients (those literally explosive moments that define action movies) with ease; Quiet-Quiet-Bang horror movies will have you leaping from your seat in fright. All receivers offer some form of room equalization during the set-up process, and while they work the same way, using a plug-in microphone, results can vary dramatically. Yamaha uses YPAO room calibration software which can measure up to eight listening positions, although it’s unlikely you’ll need to do more than four to cover your main seating area. Denon and Marantz employ Audyssey. Versions vary according to model, but the high spec MultEQ XT32 iteration also allows you to measure up to eight listening positions, adding SubEQ to tighten up paired subwoofers. Pioneer has various flavours of its own MCACC, while Arcam licenses DIRAC Live, the most sophisticated and effective of all room calibration systems. Don’t be a slave to the set-up though. If you room sounds better without calibration, go au naturale. Alternatively, apply calibration to the surrounds but not the main stereo pair. Experiment. Every room sounds different. Dolby Atmos audio decoding is a pre-requisite for any modern AV receiver. Our best advice is don’t buy one without it. Best known of all the 3D audio codecs, it’s found on Blu-ray discs and increasingly alongside 4K video pay TV services – currently BT Sport, but soon Sky too. Lower cost Atmos-equipped AVRs are usually seven channel designs. This translates to a 5.1.2 Dolby Atmos configuration – that’s to say 5.1 surround with two Atmos height channels. 5.1.2 systems work well in smaller rooms, where Atmos-enabled upfiring loudspeakers (or in-ceiling speakers, if you have them) are within 1.5m of the listening position. Larger rooms will benefit from a beefier nine channel receiver, giving the option of Dolby Atmos in 5.1.4 or 7.1.2. Some users may like a flatbed of seven channels, with side and rear speakers, plus a height component, others might prefer four height channels and two rears. Higher-end AV receivers can offer eleven channels of amplification, aka 7.1.4, for the ultimate immersive audio experience, or give you the option of expanding a seven channels to nine using additional amplification. The Denon AVR-X4300H is one such, a ferociously powerful 200w (into 6 Ohms) p/c nine-channel Atmos AVR with a full 11.2 pre-amp output. Of course, filling your home with multiple loudspeakers is always going to present a challenge, so manufacturers are devising ways of using DSP to simulate extra channels. Sony’s STR-DN1080 receiver is a 5.1.2 channel design, but employs Phantom Surround virtual speakers to create a listening experience akin to 7.1.2. Meanwhile, the Pioneer VSX-832 has just 5.1 channels of real amplification, but uses newly developed Dolby Atmos virtualization techniques to create an immersive soundstage. Dolby Atmos isn’t the only 3D audio game in town. Most Dolby Atmos receivers also offer support for DTS:X, a rival immersive sound format. Denon and Marantz even allow you to purchase an upgrade for Auro 3D, the most esoteric of all 3D audio formats. AV receivers are no longer just for theatres and Hi-Fi listening rooms. Increasingly you can use them as part of a whole home multiroom audio system. Chromecast audio, Onkyo FireConnect, Denon Heos and Yamaha MusicCast are examples of multiroom ecosystems which can be built around AV receivers. Yamaha’s Aventage AVR range can stream connected sources to any other MusicCast speaker on a home network. This means, you can listen to the audio from a TV set top box plugged into the AVR, via a wireless MusicCast speaker in the kitchen. Most AVRs also allow you to run physical cables to a second location, either audio only or both sound and vision, for simple multiroom playback. It’s important that any home cinema receiver be as future-proof as possible. So try and buy one with as many 4K-ready HDMI inputs as possible. Some cheaper receivers mix 4K ready inputs with HD-only ones. As you might expect with HDMI, there’s plenty of devil in the detail. While any HDMI v2.0 input will be compatible with 4K sources, you’ll need inputs that support HDMI v2.0a to ensure that HDR metadata makes it through to an HDR-capable display. The key attribute to both HDMI v2.0 iteration is support for HDCP 2.2 copy protection, which is used by all commercially available 4K sources, including UHD Blu-ray, 4K set top boxes like Sky Q and Virgin Media V6, and 4K media streamers. Finally, look out for how many HDMI outputs your chosen home cinema receiver has. Cheaper models offer just one, but step-up models have two (or even three), allowing you to feed a TV and a home cinema projector simultaneously. Right. That’s your Next Gen home cinema receiver sorted. Let’s get the popcorn in...


News Article | May 12, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Iran's President Hassan Rouhani appears at a campaign rally in Tehran on May 9, 2017 (AFP Photo/STR) Tehran (AFP) - Iran's President Hassan Rouhani vowed Friday to continue rebuilding ties with the world and get rid of remaining sanctions during a fiery final debate a week ahead of the election. Rouhani, who is seeking a second four-year term next Friday, said Tehran's nuclear deal with world powers had ended many sanctions and brought a windfall from renewed oil sales over the past year that could now be invested. "We want to allocate $15 billion for investments... and $3-5 billion for supporting the poor and needy," said Rouhani. But he went further in his closing statement, vowing for the first time to target the remaining US sanctions that are still hampering trade deals and preventing foreign money from entering Iran. "I will engage myself in lifting all the non-nuclear sanctions during the coming four years and bring back the grandeur of Iran and the Iranian people," he said. Removing more sanctions will be a tall order given the current stance of US President Donald Trump, who has harshly criticised the nuclear deal and vowed to take a tougher line on Iran. Rouhani faced bruising attacks throughout the debate from his conservative opponents, who say his policies have done little to help the poor. "The country is facing an economic crisis, with unemployment, recession and inflation," said hardline Tehran mayor Mohammad Bagher Ghalibaf, who repeatedly returned to his theme that Rouhani's administration had benefited only the "four percenters" at the top of society. "A tree that has not born any fruit in four years will not yield anything positive in the future," said Ghalibaf. Much of the final debate consisted of tit-for-tat corruption allegations. The conservatives accused Rouhani, his family and his associates of financial and property-related graft. The president hit back with his own allegations against the Tehran mayor from a time when he was head of security. "In 2005, I had a dossier on you in my hands and I blocked its publication. If I had let it be published at the time, you would not be sat here today," said Rouhani. A politically moderate cleric who is seen as the best option for liberalising reformists, Rouhani has been on the offensive all week, framing the vote as a choice between greater social freedoms and repression. But the final debate was themed around the economy, where continued stagnation and high unemployment have given plenty of ammunition to his conservative opponents. Cleric and jurist Ebrahim Raisi is seen as the leading conservative, though still a distant second to Rouhani in unofficial polls. He kept up his efforts to reach out to poor and religiously conservative voters. "The people expect government members to fear God," said Raisi, who runs the Imam Reza shrine in the holy city of Mashhad. "Poverty has increased with this government from 23 percent to 33 percent. We must increase direct aid to the poor," he added, accusing Rouhani's government of only boosting subsidies at the last minute to grab votes. "Why did you wait for the election campaign to increase aid? Why didn't you do it four years ago? The people are intelligent and they will decide."


According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the number of people in the United States waiting for a transplant of a critical, life-saving organ such as a kidney, liver or pancreas, is approximately 118,000, and the organ transplant waiting list grows every year. BioInk is a significant component of the burgeoning 3D bioprinting market, which is expected to grow to approximately USD 1.8 billion by 2022, and to increase substantially as the printing technology, and all its components, continue to mature. CollPlant is a regenerative medicine company leveraging its proprietary, plant-based recombinant human collagen (rhCollagen) technology for the development and commercialization of tissue repair products, initially for the orthobiologics, 3D Bio-printing of tissue and organs, and advanced wound care markets. The Company's cutting-edge technology is designed to generate and process proprietary rhCollagen, among other patent-protected recombinant proteins. Given that CollPlant's rhCollagen is identical to the type I collagen produced by the human body, it offers significant advantages compared to currently marketed tissue-derived collagen, including improved biofunctionality, superior homogeneity and reduced risk of immune response. The Company's broad development pipeline includes biomaterials indicated for orthopedics and advanced wound healing. Lead products include: Vergenix™STR (Soft Tissue Repair Matrix), for the treatment of tendinopathy; and Vergenix™FG (Flowable Gel) wound filler, for treatment of acute and chronic wounds. CollPlant's business strategy includes proprietary development and manufacture of tissue repair products and their commercialization and distribution, together with leading third parties, alongside alliances with leading companies for joint development, manufacture and marketing of additional products. For more information about CollPlant, visit http://www.collplant.com Contact at CollPlant: Eran Rotem         Chief Financial Officer     Tel: + 972-73-2325600/612     Email: Eran@collplant.com     Contact at Rx Communications Group, LLC Paula Schwartz (for US Investors) Managing Director Tel: 917-322-2216 Email: pschwartz@rxir.com


News Article | May 27, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

AlphaGo defeated brash 19-year-old world number one Ke Jie of China on Saturday to sweep a three-game series that was closely watched as a measure of how far artificial intelligence (AI) has come (AFP Photo/STR) Shanghai (AFP) - The Google-owned computer algorithm AlphaGo is retiring from playing humans in the ancient Chinese game of Go after roundly defeating the world's top player this week, its developer said Saturday. AlphaGo defeated brash 19-year-old world number one Ke Jie of China on Saturday to sweep a three-game series that was closely watched as a measure of how far artificial intelligence (AI) has come. AlphaGo last year become the first computer programme to beat an elite player in a full Go match, and its successes have been hailed as groundbreaking due to the game's complexity. Go has an incomputable number of moves, putting a premium on human-like "intuition" and strategy. But this week's contests in the eastern Chinese city of Wuzhen were its last, said DeepMind Technologies, the London-based AI company that developed AlphaGo and which Google acquired in 2014. In a blog post, DeepMind founder Demis Hassabis said AlphaGo's developers will turn to "the next set of grand challenges, developing advanced general algorithms that could one day help scientists as they tackle some of our most complex problems". These could include "finding new cures for diseases, dramatically reducing energy consumption, or inventing revolutionary new materials," he said. "If AI systems prove they are able to unearth significant new knowledge and strategies in these domains too, the breakthroughs could be truly remarkable. We can’t wait to see what comes next." Go involves two players laying black and white stones on a grid, trying to capture the most territory. Invented nearly 3,000 years ago in China, it is played worldwide but most popular in East Asia. Top players have been mesmerised by AlphaGo, describing its play as groundbreaking and opening up new ways of approaching the game. Likewise, AlphaGo's feats have fuelled visions of AI that can not only perform pre-programmed tasks, but help humanity look at complex scientific, technical and medical mysteries in new ways. AlphaGo's "thinking" is powered by millions of connections similar to neurons in the brain. It is partly self-taught, having played millions of games against itself. This week's matches received considerable build-up in China, where it is popular. But Chinese authorities abruptly banned live coverage before the first match on Tuesday, prompting anger and scorn on Chinese social media. The ban was not explained, but quickly fueled speculation that it was linked to Google's tense history with Beijing. Google shut down its www.google.cn website in 2010 in a row over cyberattacks and Chinese censorship, and most of its offerings have remained blocked by authorities.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Philippines security forces continue to battle the Abu Sayyaf group, which has kidnapped hundreds since the early 1990s to extract ransoms (AFP Photo/STR) Philippine troops and police battled dozens of gunmen protecting one of the world's most wanted Islamic militants in a built-up area of a southern city on Tuesday, authorities said. At least one policeman was killed in the hunt for Isnilon Hapilon, a leader of the infamous Abu Sayyaf kidnap gang and Philippine head of the Islamic State group, according to Philippine military chief of staff General Eduardo Ano. The fighting took place in Marawi, a mostly Muslim-populated city of about 200,000 people on the southern island of Mindanao, with the gunmen attacking a hospital during the clashes, Ano told CNN Philippines. "Please advise people to stay inside their houses. We will clear the area," Ano said. He said the fighting began when police and troops raided a house on Tuesday afternoon where Hapilon, the subject of a US State Department bounty of $5 million, was believed to be hiding. This triggered fierce clashes throughout the afternoon and into the evening, with Ano estimating there were about 50 gunmen. Photos posted on social media by Marawi residents showed the gunmen walking through the streets of Basak, a Marawi suburb of about 1,700 people. A woman who asked not to be named told AFP by text that she saw about 10 armed men take up positions at the gate of a government hospital. Police clashed with the gunmen near the hospital, leaving one officer seriously wounded and one of the extremists dead, she added. The military said it could not confirm the militant's death. Ano said eight security personnel had been injured in the clashes. The Abu Sayyaf, based on the most southern islands of Mindanao, has kidnapped hundreds of Filipinos and foreigners since the early 1990s to extract ransoms. The militants beheaded an elderly German early this year and two Canadians last year after ransom demands were not met. It has also been blamed for the country's worst terrorist attacks, including the 2004 bombing of a ferry in Manila Bay that claimed more than 100 lives. The US State Department bounty for Hapilon was offered following alleged terrorist acts against US citizens, including the 2001 kidnapping of three Americans in the western Philippines -- two of whom were later killed. Security analysts say Hapilon has been trying to unite Filipino militant groups that have professed allegiance to IS. These include the Maute group, which is based near Marawi, hundreds of kilometres to the north of the Abu Sayyaf strongholds. The Maute group has engaged in repeated deadly battles with the military over the past year in rural areas around Marawi. The International Committee of the Red Cross, which has an office near Marawi and operates in the area, voiced alarm that civilians may get caught up in the fighting. "We are extremely concerned about the impact of the ongoing hostilities in Marawi City on the civilians," the head of the ICRC's Philippine delegation, Pascal Porchet, said in a statement. "We urge all parties to the conflict to spare civilians and respect civilian property, such as hospitals and schools, in fulfullment of their obligations to respect international humanitarian law." The Marawi fighting came six weeks after the military foiled a mass kidnapping attempt by the Abu Sayyaf on the central resort island of Bohol. The US and other Western governments warned this month that terrorists plan to kidnap foreigners in tourist hotspots across the central and western Philippines.


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A Chinese woman has drawn criticism on social media for unfavourably comparing her homeland's air and politics to those in the US (AFP Photo/STR) Beijing (AFP) - A young Chinese woman has drawn criticism on social media after unfavourably comparing her homeland's air and politics to those in the US during her graduation speech at an American university. Speaking at the University of Maryland, Yang Shuping said that coming to the United States had been a breath of "fresh air" after growing up in China. "The air was so sweet and fresh and utterly luxurious," she said, in a video of the speech posted on YouTube. "The moment I inhaled and exhaled outside the airport, I felt free," she continued, drawing a parallel between China's notorious air pollution and its similarly choking restrictions on political speech. The reaction was swift and brutal, with comments in Chinese and English telling her to stay in America. On Tuesday afternoon, posts related to the video on the Chinese micro blogging site Weibo had received over 56 million views. "People like this, with biased opinions and broken English, should never be allowed to speak publicly as a commencement speaker," said one remark posted under the YouTube video. The site is banned in China. Commenters who said they hailed from Yang's hometown Kunming accused her of lying about the air quality in the major metropolis in the city's southwest, with many claiming it was as clean as Washington's, near her university's campus. "The only explanation for her wearing a mask in Kunming is that she's ugly," said one commenter on Weibo, referring to her comment that she had worn one to protect herself from the bad air. On Tuesday, air quality readings in Kunming were as high as 107, four times the World Health Organization's recommended maximum exposure for a 24-hour period. In Washington, they were at two. Thinly veiled criticisms of the speech appeared in state-owned media Tuesday, quoting some of the vicious responses. An article titled "Chinese student at University of Maryland slammed for biased commencement speech" was ranked as the most viewed story on the English-language website of the People's Daily, the Communist Party mouthpiece. As the criticism piled up, Yang, who majored in psychology and theatre, apologised according to an article in the state-owned tabloid the Global Times, a reaction that seemingly proved her point that there is little space in China for critical speech. In a statement responding to the uproar, the University of Maryland said "it is critical to hear different viewpoints, to embrace diversity, and demonstrate tolerance when faced with views with which we may disagree." "Listening to and respectfully engaging with those whom we disagree are essential skills, both within university walls and beyond." Some commenters on Weibo agreed: "it looks like even if Chinese people go to America, they still can't have freedom of speech," one said.


News Article | April 23, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A ferry crash in the port of Las Palmas, Canary Islands, has created a three-kilometre long diesel slick (AFP Photo/STR) Madrid (AFP) - Spanish coast guard crews worked Sunday to clean up a three-kilometre (1.9-mile) long diesel slick off the holiday island of Gran Canaria after a passenger ferry slammed into a pier. The ferry carrying 140 passengers smashed into a breakwater late Friday in the port of Las Palmas, the capital of Spain's Canary islands off the northwest coast of Africa. Thirteen people were injured and the crash damaged underwater fuel pipes, the regional government said in a statement. Video footage on Spanish television showed chunks of concrete falling onto the port. Emergency crews managed on Saturday to collect half of the roughly 60,000 litres (16,000 gallons) of diesel that spilled into the ocean, the regional government said. Three coast guard boats were on Sunday working to break up the slick -- which is three kilometres long and half a kilometre wide -- to help the diesel evaporate, it added. "Work on the spill is continuing and we hope that it will have evaporated before Monday. Experts do not believe there is risk to the environment," Fernando Clavijo, the president of the regional government, said in a tweet. Beaches around Las Palmas and Telde, the two main towns on Gran Canaria, would be closed on Sunday as a precaution, the regional government said. Repairing the pier will cost around two million euros ($2.1 million) and take six months, it added. Ferry operator Naviera Armas said the accident was caused by a technical fault that sparked a power cut on the boat.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Analysts say a faster growth rate in China in the first quarter of 2017 was driven by a pick-up in industry and construction (AFP Photo/STR) Beijing (AFP) - China's economy grew 6.9 percent in the first quarter of 2017, government data showed Monday, beating expectations in the latest sign of stabilisation for the world's second-largest economy. Beijing has said it wants to transition away from a reliance on debt-fuelled investment and towards a consumer-driven economic model, but the transition has proved bumpy. The economy grew at just 6.7 percent in 2016, its slowest rate in a quarter of a century. "For the first time in the recent years, China starts a year with a strong headline GDP," Raymond Yeung of Australia & New Zealand Banking Group told Bloomberg News. "Thanks to strong investment and property, the economy is performing well." The reading Monday marked the second quarterly improvement since the final three months of 2014. It was better than the median analyst expectation of 6.8 percent in an AFP poll, and also up on the fourth quarter figure. "The national economy in the first quarter has maintained the momentum of steady and sound development," the National Bureau of Statistics said in a statement. It added that "positive changes kept emerging and major indicators performed better than expected". Monday's data also showed China's industrial output growth rose to 7.6 percent year-on-year in March, beating a Bloomberg estimate of 6.3. Retail spending rebounded to a forecast-beating 10.9 percent, while fixed-asset investment rose 9.2 percent in the first three months of the year, representing a slight acceleration from February. The readings follow data showing robust foreign trade and a further expansion in factory activity driven by a pickup in production and demand last month. The faster growth rate was driven by a pick-up in industry and construction, Brian Jackson of IHS Global Insight said in a note, adding that "mining, manufacturing and utilities growth all accelerated", while the services sector slowed. But the return to stimulus spending and infrastructure to drive the economy shows Beijing has reverted to "the same old" investment-driven growth model, Raymond Yeung and David Qu of ANZ Research wrote in a note. They said the government's announcement last month that it would build a vast new economic zone in the relatively unprosperous area of Xiong'an shows authorities have a "tendency to rely on infrastructure development to sustain growth". News of the Xiong'an zone, which is expected to eventually cover a vast area of some 2,000 square kilometres, set off a flurry of speculative real-estate purchases in the area, which has been struggling economically. Cheap credit has meanwhile bolstered the construction sector since last year, attracting savers and speculators who have fuelled housing prices in large cities and accelerated manufacturing activity. But looking ahead, China's growth momentum is not expected to last through the whole year, Julian Evans-Pritchard of Capital Economics said in a note. "Our own measure of economic activity also points to a strong start to 2017, though we don't expect the strength to be sustained," he said. "With the acceleration in credit growth that helped drive the recent recovery now being reversed, we still expect the economy to begin slowing before long." Jackson said that a steady deceleration in the real estate sector should take hold from the second quarter, adding that it would "create an additional drag for both the services and construction components of GDP". The government has trimmed its 2017 GDP growth target to "around 6.5 percent". According to the AFP poll's median full-year forecast, China's GDP growth will fall to 6.6 percent for the year.


News Article | April 23, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Ballistic missiles are displayed on April 16, 2016 through Kim Il-Sung Square during a military parade in Pyongyang marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung (AFP Photo/STR) Australia and New Zealand stiffened their rhetoric against North Korea Sunday after the isolated state threatened Canberra with a nuclear strike, urging it to think twice before "blindly and zealously toeing the US line". The move comes as US Vice President Mike Pence wraps up an Asia tour, which has included visits to South Korea, Japan and Australia partly to reassure allies amid fears that Pyongyang may be readying for a sixth nuclear test. "If Australia persists in following the US' moves to isolate and stifle North Korea... this will be a suicidal act," a North Korean foreign ministry spokesman said after Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop called the hermit state a "serious threat". The spokesman, speaking to the North's official KCNA news agency, warned Bishop to "think twice about the consequences". Australia's close ally New Zealand has since accused North Korea of having "evil intent". For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android. Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee told Television New Zealand Sunday people knew little about Kim Jong-Un's regime but "you would assume that underneath him there is a very big machinery of people who have equally evil intent". "It's North Korea that is sending the missiles into the Sea of Japan and making the various outrageous threats including the threats overnight to Australia," he added. Australia's Bishop added on Sunday that the North Korean government "should invest in the welfare of its long-suffering citizens, rather than weapons of mass destruction". The reclusive state has long been seeking to develop a long-range missile capable of hitting the US mainland with a nuclear warhead, and has so far staged five atomic tests, two of them last year. Pence vowed Wednesday that the US would counter any attack with an "overwhelming and effective" response after a senior North Korean official pledged weekly missile tests and "all-out war" if the US took any action against it. In Sydney, Pence maintained calls for Pyongyang's sole ally China to do more to rein in its neighbour. Australia's Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull also urged China to use its leverage over the hermit state, describing the North Korean regime as "reckless and dangerous". He added that Australia and the US were "absolutely united" in their determination to achieve a nuclear-free Korean peninsula. Supercarrier Carl Vinson is due to start joint exercises with Japan's navy on Sunday, Tokyo's defence ministry said, with the drills expected to last several days and involve two Japanese warships.


News Article | April 30, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Ballistic missiles are displayed on April 16, 2016 through Kim Il-Sung Square during a military parade in Pyongyang marking the 105th anniversary of the birth of late North Korean leader Kim Il-Sung (AFP Photo/STR) Donald Trump thinks Chinese President Xi Jinping is "putting pressure" on North Korea, the US president said in an interview to air Sunday, as tensions mount over Pyongyang's nuclear and missile programs. If North Korea carries out a nuclear test "I would not be happy," Trump told the CBS television network's "Face the Nation" program. "And I can tell you also, I don't believe that the president of China, who is a very respected man, will be happy either," Trump said in excerpts of the interview released Saturday. Asked if "not happy" signified "military action," Trump answered: "I don't know. I mean, we'll see." North Korea test-fired a missile over the weekend in apparent defiance of a concerted US push for tougher international sanctions to curb Pyongyang's nuclear weapons ambitions. The latest launch, which South Korea said was a failure, came just hours after US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson warned the UN Security Council of "catastrophic consequences" if the international community -- most notably China -- failed to pressure the North into abandoning its weapons program. Trump assailed the failed launch as a show of disrespect toward its ally China. "North Korea disrespected the wishes of China & its highly respected President when it launched, though unsuccessfully, a missile today. Bad!" Trump wrote on Twitter. North Korea is seeking to develop a long-range missile capable of hitting the US mainland with a nuclear warhead. China, Pyongyang's number one trade partner, has repeatedly called for a return to talks on denuclearization but has been reluctant to use economic pressure that could destabilize North Korea. For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available now on iOS and Android.

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