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Stony Brook, NY, United States

Diel I.J.,Center for Gynecological Oncology | Body J.-J.,Free University of Colombia | Stopeck A.T.,Stony Brook Cancer Center | Vadhan-Raj S.,University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center | And 6 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Background: We compared the activity of denosumab with zoledronic acid for delaying or preventing hypercalcaemia of malignancy (HCM) in patients with advanced cancer and bone metastases or with multiple myeloma. Methods: Patient-level data were combined from two identically designed, randomised, double-blind, active-controlled, phase III trials of advanced cancer patients with breast cancer and other solid tumours (excluding breast or prostate cancer) or multiple myeloma. End-points included time to first on-study HCM, time to first and subsequent on-study HCM, proportion of patients experiencing HCM and proportion of patients experiencing recurrent HCM. Results: Denosumab significantly delayed the time to first on-study HCM, representing a 37% reduction in the hazard ratio (HR) compared with zoledronic acid (HR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.41-0.98; P = 0.042) and reduced the risk of developing recurrent HCM (time to first and subsequent on-study HCM) by 52% (rate ratio, 0.48; 95% CI: 0.29-0.81; P = 0.006). The median time on study was 12.9. months. Fewer patients receiving denosumab compared with zoledronic acid experienced an HCM event (1.7% versus 2.7%; P = 0.028). Of the 84 patients experiencing an HCM event, 40% of those receiving zoledronic acid experienced >1 event of HCM compared with 31% of those receiving denosumab. Conclusion: Denosumab treatment was more efficacious than treatment with zoledronic acid in delaying or preventing HCM in advanced cancer patients with breast cancer, other solid tumours or multiple myeloma. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.


Chahal J.,University of Arizona | Stopeck A.,Stony Brook Cancer Center | Clarke K.,Arizona Cancer Center | Livingston R.B.,Arizona Cancer Center | Chalasani P.,Arizona Cancer Center
Neurological Sciences | Year: 2015

Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) secondary to metastatic breast cancer (MBC) has increased in incidence with improved systemic disease control. Current treatment options include radiation therapy (to symptomatic sites) and systemic treatment [intrathecal (IT) or intravenous (IV) chemotherapy]. Methotrexate (MTX), thiotepa and cytarabine are the most commonly used IT agents, while high-dose MTX is the most common IV regimen. While IT treatments are generally well tolerated, complications like chemical meningitis, leukoencephalopathy, etc. occur. LMC may cause a breakdown in the blood–brain barrier and thus allow systemic agents to penetrate; however, efficacy is reported only for agents administered at high doses (MTX). We report our institution’s experience in using IV thiotepa as treatment for LMC secondary to MBC. We conducted a retrospective chart review of 13 patients with MBC who developed LMC and treated with IV thiotepa at our institution. It was administered at 40 mg/m2 every 21 days; median number of thiotepa cycles administered was 5 with the major dose-limiting toxicity being myelosuppression. Four had partial response, 3 had stable disease and 6 had progressive disease. The 6-month survival rate was 69 % and 1-year survival rate was 31 %. Despite retrospective nature of our case series, we found the use of IV thiotepa as sole treatment for LMC in patients with MBC to be well tolerated, easily administered in the ambulatory setting, and with efficacy comparable to the other chemotherapeutic agents commonly used in the treatment of LMC. This regimen warrants further investigation in prospective studies. © 2015, Springer-Verlag Italia.


Diel I.J.,Center for Gynecological Oncology | Body J.-J.,Free University of Colombia | Stopeck A.T.,Stony Brook Cancer Center | Vadhan-Raj S.,University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center | And 6 more authors.
European Journal of Cancer | Year: 2015

Background: We compared the activity of denosumab with zoledronic acid for delaying or preventing hypercalcaemia of malignancy (HCM) in patients with advanced cancer and bone metastases or with multiple myeloma. Methods: Patient-level data were combined from two identically designed, randomised, double-blind, active-controlled, phase III trials of advanced cancer patients with breast cancer and other solid tumours (excluding breast or prostate cancer) or multiple myeloma. End-points included time to first on-study HCM, time to first and subsequent on-study HCM, proportion of patients experiencing HCM and proportion of patients experiencing recurrent HCM. Results: Denosumab significantly delayed the time to first on-study HCM, representing a 37% reduction in the hazard ratio (HR) compared with zoledronic acid (HR, 0.63; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.41-0.98; P = 0.042) and reduced the risk of developing recurrent HCM (time to first and subsequent on-study HCM) by 52% (rate ratio, 0.48; 95% CI: 0.29-0.81; P = 0.006). The median time on study was 12.9 months. Fewer patients receiving denosumab compared with zoledronic acid experienced an HCM event (1.7% versus 2.7%; P = 0.028). Of the 84 patients experiencing an HCM event, 40% of those receiving zoledronic acid experienced >1 event of HCM compared with 31% of those receiving denosumab. Conclusion: Denosumab treatment was more efficacious than treatment with zoledronic acid in delaying or preventing HCM in advanced cancer patients with breast cancer, other solid tumours or multiple myeloma. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


De Sabando A.R.,State University of New York at Stony Brook | Wang C.,Scripps Research Institute | He Y.,Scripps Research Institute | Garcia-Barros M.,Stony Brook Cancer Center | And 5 more authors.
Molecular Cancer Therapeutics | Year: 2016

Colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer mortality in Western civilization. Studies have shown that colorectal cancer arises as a consequence of the modification of genes that regulate important cellular functions. Deregulation of the WNT and RAS/MAPK/PI3K signaling pathways has been shown to be important in the early stages of colorectal cancer development and progression. Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) is a transcription factor that is highly expressed in the proliferating intestinal crypt epithelial cells. Previously, we showed that KLF5 is a mediator of RAS/MAPK and WNT signaling pathways under homeostatic conditions and that it promotes their tumorigenic functions during the development and progression of intestinal adenomas. Recently, using an ultrahigh-throughput screening approach we identified a number of novel small molecules that have the potential to provide therapeutic benefits for colorectal cancer by targeting KLF5 expression. In the current study, we show that an improved analogue of one of these screening hits, ML264, potently inhibits proliferation of colorectal cancer cells in vitro through modifications of the cell-cycle profile. Moreover, in an established xenograft mouse model of colon cancer, we demonstrate that ML264 efficiently inhibits growth of the tumor within 5 days of treatment. We show that this effect is caused by a significant reduction in proliferation and that ML264 potently inhibits the expression of KLF5 and EGR1, a transcriptional activator of KLF5. These findings demonstrate that ML264, or an analogue, may hold a promise as a novel therapeutic agent to curb the development and progression of colorectal cancer. © 2015 American Association for Cancer Research.


Brown-Glaberman U.,University of New Mexico | Marron M.,Arizona Cancer Center | Chalasani P.,Arizona Cancer Center | Livingston R.,Arizona Cancer Center | And 3 more authors.
Disease Markers | Year: 2016

Introduction. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a hypoxia regulated metalloenzyme integral to maintaining cellular pH. Increased CAIX expression is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. To explore CAIX as a biomarker for breast cancer therapies, we measured plasma CAIX levels in healthy control subjects and in breast cancer patients. Methods. In control subjects we evaluated plasma CAIX stability via commercially available ELISA. We then similarly quantified plasma CAIX levels in (1) locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) patients treated with neoadjuvant paclitaxel + sunitinib (T + S) followed by doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC); (2) metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patients treated with systemic chemotherapy. Results. Plasma CAIX levels were stable at room temperature for at least 48 hours in control subjects. Mean baseline plasma CAIX levels were lower in controls compared to patients with LABC or MBC. In LABC, CAIX levels rose significantly in response to administration of antiangiogenic therapy (T + S) (p = 0.02) but not AC (p = 0.37). In patients with MBC treated without an antiangiogenic agent CAIX levels did not change with therapy. Conclusions. Our results suggest that CAIX may be an easily obtained, stable measure of tumor associated hypoxia as well as a useful pharmacodynamic biomarker for antiangiogenic therapy. © 2016 Ursa Brown-Glaberman et al.

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