Stoecker And Associates

ROLLA, MO, United States

Stoecker And Associates

ROLLA, MO, United States
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A method for automatic segmentation of dermoscopy skin lesion images includes automating a Geodesic Active Contour (GAC) initialization to be sufficiently large to encompass the lesion yet lie near the actual lesion contour. In addition, a new image plane is found by transforming the original RGB image to a smoothed image that allows the GAC to move without sticking on the minimum local energy. This method can eliminate the need for separate hair or noise removal algorithms. The method may include extraction of designated color planes to improve the initial contour and to automatically correct false segmentations. The method includes an algorithm to correct false protuberances and/or false inlets that may be present in the GAC border. A method is given to increase likelihood of including more actual lesion area. The method yields multiple border choices which may be presented to a classifier for optimal border selection.


Patent
Stoecker And Associates, University of Missouri, U.S. Air force and University of Michigan | Date: 2010-04-08

Methods and immunoassays for diagnosing a bite or sting of a venomous organism in a patient having symptoms consistent with such a bite or sting are provided. A sample of venom is collected from the area of the suspected bite or sting using a swab and then contacted with an antibody that specifically binds to an antigenic site on venom present in the sample. Binding is then detected. The invention is illustrated by examples showing diagnosis of brown recluse spider bite, distinguishing it from other diagnoses with which it is often confused. This extremely sensitive test can detect venom antigens down to about 20 picograms even after the sample has been shipped and stored for periods of up to three weeks during the summer.


Trademark
Spidertek Llc and Stoecker And Associates | Date: 2010-05-18

Medical diagnostic assays, namely, immunoassays for envenomation by brown recluse spiders. traps to capture brown recluse spiders.


Trademark
Stoecker And Associates | Date: 2012-02-14

Device for melanoma and skin cancer diagnosis by image analysis.


Trademark
Stoecker And Associates | Date: 2012-08-27

Software for analyzing an image of a portion of a patients skin to determine the presence or absence, or likehood of the presence or absence, of malanoma.


Trademark
Stoecker And Associates | Date: 2012-08-27

Software for analyzing an image of a pharmaceutical pill and identifying its characteristics including brand, active ingredient and dosage.


Trademark
Stoecker And Associates | Date: 2015-06-03

Bandages impregnated with Zinc and saline for skin wounds.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 116.37K | Year: 2010

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): SkinScan digital dermoscopy skin cancer detection software, developed by Missouri's SandA, can now detect critical features of early melanoma. However, there is also a need for diagnostic help for the other 90+% of skin cancers. The need for diagnostic improvement in screening for skin cancers may be greatest in those nurse practitioners who now see the majority of elderly patients in some underserved areas. Underserved clinical arenas with a greater than average incidence of skin cancer and significant numbers of nurse practitioners include both civilian and military clinics in the rural Midwest, where SandA is located. This innovative software is a timely development designed to solve problems every healthcare consumer has encountered- too long a wait to get specialty care, uncertainty about the diagnosis when one does get the care, and too much overall expenditure in providing the care. The proposed Phase I research addresses the steps needed to develop the SkinScan automatic detection modules for basal cell carcinoma. The BASAL features, first described by Stoecker and Stolz, will be programmed during Phase I and incorporated in our early detection system. Additional work during Phase I will allow acquisition of more clinical and dermoscopy images, will allow training of the first nurse practitioner, and will allow development of a hierarchical neural network for diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma. With over a decade of development using thousands of images from dermatology practices in the United States and Europe, SkinScan at the end of the Phase II research period will have demonstrated effectiveness in an early cancer detection clinical trial. This trial provides a bridge to market for a product that will result in increased access to high quality care by providing automated diagnostic assistance for the most deadly skin cancer, melanoma, and the most common skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma, by detecting key early features of these skin cancers. The software is designed to guide the non-specialist nurse practitioner or physician assistant, helping to make the biopsy/no biopsy decision, the most critical decision in early detection of skin cancer. PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: SandA proposes the SkinScan Training System for Skin Cancer Screening, to meet the needs of nurse practitioners in finding skin cancers. SandA offers practitioners an integrated database system that allows even those without specialized dermatology training to identify skin cancers at a very early stage, before they become deadly. The SandA SkinScan Training System is comprised of 3 parts: Dermoscopy cancer detection software with searchable atlas, DermLite D3 cross-polarized light dermoscope, and Melanoma and Mimics Clinical Tutorial. Phase I of this research proposal contains key milestones in development of the most advanced software dedicated to identifying signs on dermoscopy images of the most common skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma. SkinScan is in an excellent position to compete in the marketplace. Key personnel at SandA bring decades of experience in software development and a record of introducing innovative software to the dermatology market. The SkinScan system is the first such product to be marketed to nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and family practitioners. This proposal concentrates on nurse practitioners, the largest single group of non-physician practitioners seeing primarily adults in a general practice setting. Phase I and Phase II of this proposal should allow us to reach the software sale stage. After that, integration with strategic partners will allow market expansion.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 800.52K | Year: 2010

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Envenomations by the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa, are a significant source of morbidity in endemic regions of the United States, and misdiagnoses are common. A survey of physicians in the endemic area has shown the economic viability of an accurate diagnostic test for these spider bites. Development and testing of an optimized Loxosceles venom assay will present significant challenges. Unlike the routine construction of ELISAs dedicated to the detection of a single protein, this ELISA will detect venom containing multiple proteins, including a unique physiologically active protein- sphingomyelinase D (SMD) abundantly present in the venom. In preliminary research, our polyclonal assay has shown good sensitivity and good in-vitro specificity. Our research shows that identifiable amounts of venom in clinical envenomations are present for at least seven days. In rabbits, our polyclonal assay allows identification of venom on the surface for as long as two weeks. The limits of sensitivity, in-vivo specificity, and the duration of detection are unknown. Phase I should allow determination of the smallest amount of venom detectable as well as the clinical time limits for in-vivo duration of sensitivity and specificity of the assay. Monoclonal antibodies will be isotyped and quantities raised in a bioreactor to perform checkerboard analysis. This analysis will allow determination of an optimal combination of L. reclusa monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. A kit assay will result from Phase I, allowing multi-site testing in Phase II. These clinical studies will allow development of a lateral flow assay or microtiter plate assay, with the goal of FDA device approval and marketing. Clinical application of an optimized assay would save the morbidity and expense due to inappropriate diagnosis and treatment of various skin conditions with presentations similar to Loxosceles envenomations. Techniques used in the successful detection of this spider venom are directly applicable to bites from S. American Loxosceles species, responsible for additional deaths each year. The swab venom assay technique could be applicable to envenomations from numerous species PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE: Bites of the brown recluse spider, Loxosceles reclusa, cause considerable morbidity and occasional mortality in the Midwest. Many lesions can appear similar and mimic spider bites, including bacterial and fungal skin infections as well as skin cancer. The goal of this project is to develop a commercially viable test for brown recluse spider bites using a painless and simple swab test for the spider venom on the surface of the skin.


Trademark
Stoecker And Associates | Date: 2011-11-14

Medical device, namely, a light employing cross-polarized light for precise identification of skin cancer for confirmation that no visible skin cancer remains after a medical procedure.

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