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News Article | May 14, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Give Something Back, a national organization devoted to mentoring and college scholarships for students facing economic adversity, has hired Domenic Merendino as Mentor Manager for Give Back scholars in South Jersey. “We’re very excited to have Domenic join our staff,” said Kelly Dun, executive director of Give Back’s Mid-Atlantic Chapter. “Domenic is great with kids. He taught English in public junior high schools in Yokohama, Japan for two years, and worked at the United Advocacy Group (UAG) in Bridgeton, NJ, writing grants and planning educational programs for students.” Born and raised in Penns Grove, NJ, Merendino attended high school at the Salem County Vo-Tech. At Stockton University, he majored in economics and minored in writing; served as an Admissions Ambassador and Economics Society President; and tutored students in writing, economics and statistics. Merendino graduated summa cum laude in 2013. Despite studying economics, he became very interested in the field of education, even writing his college thesis on the rise of student loan debt over the last decade. “Domenic will be instrumental in assisting Give Back with recruiting and training of mentors and developing programming for our scholars,” added Dun. For more information about the Give Something Back mentoring program, visit http://www.giveback.ngo/mentors/ About Giving Something Back Give Back awards scholarships to academically driven students of modest means who might not otherwise attend college. Pell Grant-eligible students are selected in the ninth grade and mentored throughout high school. After graduation, Give Back scholars attend one of Give Back’s partner universities or colleges in Delaware, Illinois, New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania. It is the focus of the organization to help students graduate college in four years, debt free for tuition, fees, or room and board.


Coastal communities are enduring growing flood risks from rising seas, with places like Atlantic City, sandwiched between a bay and the ocean, facing some of the greatest threats. Guided by new research by Climate Central’s Scott Kulp and Benjamin Strauss, reporter John Upton and photographer Ted Blanco chronicled the plight of this city’s residents as they struggle to deal with the impacts. Upton spent months investigating how the city is adapting, revealing vast inequity between the rich and the poor. A driver plowed a sedan forcefully up Arizona Avenue, which had flooded to knee height during a winter storm as high tide approached. The wake from the passing Honda buffeted low brick fences lining the tidy homes of working-class residents of this failing casino city, pushing floodwaters into Eileen DeDomenicis’s living room. “It wasn’t bad when we first moved in here — the flooding wasn’t bad,” DeDomenicis said on a stormy morning in March, after helping her husband put furniture on blocks. She counted down until the tide would start to ebb, using a yardstick to measure the height of floodwaters climbing her patio stairs. She was tracking how many more inches it would take to inundate the ground floor. “When somebody comes by in a car, it splashes up. It hits the door.” DeDomenicis has lived in this house since 1982, a few hundred feet from a bay. She used to work as a restaurant server; now she’s a school crossing guard. Her husband walked a mile to his job at Bally’s Casino until he retired in January. They’ve seen floods worsen as the seas have risen, as the land beneath them has sunk, and as local infrastructure has rotted away. “It comes in the front door, the back door, and then from the bottom of the house, in through the sides,” DeDomenicis said. “You watch it come in and it meets in the middle of the house — and there’s nothing you can do.” Two miles east of Arizona Avenue, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is spending tens of millions of dollars building a seawall to reduce storm surge and flooding risks for Atlantic City’s downtown and its towering casinos, five of which have closed in the past four years. A few miles in the other direction, it’s preparing to spend tens of millions more on sand dunes to protect million-dollar oceanfront homes. But the federal government has done little to protect the residents of Arizona Avenue, or the millions of other working class and poor Americans who live near bays up and down the East Coast, from a worsening flooding crisis. Seas are rising as pollution from fossil fuel burning, forest losses, and farming fuels global warming, melting ice, and expanding ocean water. With municipal budgets stretched thin, lower-income neighborhoods built on low-lying land are enduring some of the worst impacts. Climate Central scientists analyzed hundreds of coastal American cities and, in 90 of them, projected rapid escalation in the number of roads and homes facing routine inundation. The flooding can destroy vehicles, damage homes, block roads and freeways, hamper emergency operations, foster disease spread by mosquitoes, and cause profound inconveniences for coastal communities. Atlantic City is among those facing the greatest risks, yet much of the high-value property that the Army Corps is working to protect was built on a higher elevation and faces less frequent flooding than neighborhoods occupied by working class and unemployed residents — an increasing number of whom are living in poverty. Earthen mounds called bulkheads built along Atlantic City’s shores to block floods have washed away, or were never built in the first place. Flap valves in aging storm drains have stopped working, allowing water to flow backward from the bay into the street when tides are high. At high tide, stormwater pools in Arizona Avenue, unable to drain to the bay. The flooding is getting worse because seas have been rising along the mid-Atlantic coast faster than in most other regions, and the land here is sinking because of groundwater pumping and natural processes. High tides in Atlantic City reach more than a foot higher than they did a century ago, and sea-level rise is accelerating. New Jersey has done little to address the problem, aside from administering federal grants that have helped a limited number of residents abandon or elevate vulnerable houses. “We expect each town to focus on planning and budgeting for mitigating flooding,” said New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection spokesperson Bob Considine. Atlantic City can nary afford the kinds of capital improvements needed to provide meaningful relief. The Army Corps last year began a study of bay flooding in a sweeping stretch of New Jersey covering Atlantic City and 88 other municipalities, home to an estimated 700,000. The study was authorized by Congress in 1987, but it wasn’t kickstarted until federal research identified widespread risks following Superstorm Sandy. The bay flooding study is “fairly early in the process,” said Joseph Forcina, a senior Army Corps official who is overseeing more than $4 billion worth of post-Sandy recovery work by the agency, including construction of a $34 million seawall in downtown Atlantic City and tens of millions of dollars worth of sand dune construction and replenishment nearby. The study is expected to take more than two years. “We really are in the data-gathering mode.” The study will help the agency propose a plan, which Congress could consider funding, to ease flood risks when high tides and storms push seawater from bays into streets and homes. It will consider the effects of sea-level rise, but it won’t directly address flooding from poor drainage of rainwater, meaning any fixes spurred by the study are likely to be partial at best. “The Corps is not the agency that deals with interior drainage,” Forcina said. “That’s a local responsibility.” Floods are driving up insurance rates, while routinely causing property damage and inconveniences. Federal flood insurance promotes coastal living in high-risk areas, and the program is more than $20 billion in arrears following Hurricane Katrina and Sandy. Arizona Avenue residents received Federal Emergency Management Agency letters in March warning of insurance rate increases ahead of 5 to 18 percent a year, which “makes us want to leave even more,” said Tom Gitto. Raising three children on Arizona Avenue, Gitto and his wife have been unemployed since the closure last year of Trump Taj Mahal, where they worked. He said the flooding has become unbearable but property prices are so low that they feel trapped. Two houses on Arizona Avenue recently sold for less than $35,000. Gitto paid a similar price for his fixer-upper in the 1990s, then spent more than the purchase price on renovations. Flood insurance provided $36,000 for another refurbishment after Sandy ravaged their home. Flooding strikes the Jersey Shore so often now that the National Weather Service’s office in Mount Holly, New Jersey, raised the threshold at which it issues flood advisories by more than three inches in 2012 “to avoid creating warning fatigue,” flooding program manager Dean Iovino said. Such advisories were being issued nearly every month in Atlantic City before the policy change, up from an average of four months a year in the 1980s. One out of 10 of the 20,000 homes in Atlantic City are at elevations that put them at risk of flooding each year on average, Climate Central found, though some are protected by bulkheads and other infrastructure that help keep floods at bay. The research was published Wednesday in the journal Climatic Change. The proportion of the city’s streets and homes affected by flooding is projected to quickly rise. Within about 30 years — the typical life of a mortgage — one out of three homes in Atlantic City could be inundated in a typical year. That would be the case even if aggressive efforts to slow climate change are put in place, such as a rapid global switch from fossil fuels to clean energy. The worsening woes aren’t confined to Atlantic City, though risks here are among the greatest in America. Neighborhoods near bays can experience rapid increases in the number of streets and homes exposed to regular floods, with small additional sea level capable of reaching far into flat cityscapes and suburbs. Elsewhere at the Jersey Shore, in Ocean City, New Jersey, the analysis showed one out of five homes are built on land expected to flood in typical years, a figure that could rise to nearly half by 2050. Other cities facing rapid increases in risks include San Mateo along San Francisco Bay in Silicon Valley, the lumber town of Aberdeen at Grays Harbor in Washington state, and Poquoson, Virginia, which has a population of 12,000 and juts into the Chesapeake Bay. The greenhouse gas pollution that’s already been pumped into the atmosphere makes it too late to prevent coastal flooding from getting worse. It’s simply a matter of how much worse. The benefits of acting now to slow the effects of warming later would become clearest in the second half of this century. In Atlantic City, if global pollution trends continue and defenses are not improved, 80 percent of current homes risk being inundated in typical years by the end of the century, the analysis showed. By contrast, if greenhouse gas pollution is aggressively reduced almost immediately, the number of homes expected to be exposed to that risk in 2100 would fall to 60 percent. As efforts to protect the climate flounder in the U.S. and elsewhere, unleashing higher temperatures and seas, communities like the DeDomenicises’ have three basic options for adapting. They can defend against floods with infrastructure that keeps tidal waters at bay, such as bulkheads, pumps, and marsh and dune restorations. They can accommodate the water using measures such as elevating existing houses and building new ones on stilts. And they can relocate altogether, an option that’s expected to lead to mass migrations inland during the decades ahead. Modeling by University of Georgia demographer Mathew Hauer projects 250,000 being forced by rising seas from New Jersey by century’s end if pollution levels remain high, with nearly 1.5 million refugees fleeing to Texas from U.S. coasts elsewhere. And from Florida — the poster child for sea-level dangers in the U.S. — 2.5 million may be driven to other states. All three strategies are being pursued to some extent in Atlantic City. All of them are expensive, limiting the options available for a city in decline. “Cities boom and bust,” said Benjamin Strauss, coauthor of the new study and vice president for sea level and climate impacts at Climate Central, which researches and reports on climate change. “Neighborhoods can thrive, and fall into decay. Those are, to some extent, natural cycles of economic life. But now, superimposed onto that for Atlantic City at just the wrong time is this awful existential sea-level threat.” Barrier islands like Absecon Island, upon which Atlantic City grew as a gaming and vacation mecca, line the East Coast, from New York to Florida, natural features associated with the coastline’s wide continental shelf and shallow waters. Until barrier islands were developed and armored with seawalls, roads, and building foundations, low-lying shores facing the mainland could keep up with rising seas. Wind and waves washed sand and mud over growing marshes, helping to build up the land. Now, a century of development has locked down the shape and position of the islands, blocking natural processes. “It’s a huge problem for the U.S.,” said Benjamin Horton, a professor at Rutgers University in New Jersey, which is a global leader in researching sea rise. “These barrier islands are important for so many things — important for housing, important for the economy. They’re important for a variety of industries. They’re especially important for ecosystems. And the barriers protect the mainland from hurricanes; they’re a first line of defense. You lose the barrier islands and where do you think the big waves are going to hit?” As barrier islands and mainland coastlines were developed, wealthy neighborhoods clustered near ocean shores, where the elevations tend to be higher — which reduces flood risks — and where views are considered the best. Lower-income neighborhoods and industrial zones grew over former marshlands near bays and rivers, where swampy smells are strongest and where flooding occurs most frequently. That divide between rich and poor is clearly on display on Absecon Island, where stately houses built on higher land facing the ocean are often occupied only during summer — when risks of storms are lowest. The vacation homes and downtown Atlantic City casinos will be protected from storm surges by a new seawall and sand dunes built by the Army Corps, despite lawsuits filed by homeowners angry that dunes will block ocean views. Poorer neighborhoods are exemplified by Arizona Avenue, a block-long street between a bay and a minor thoroughfare. Bricks in fences and walls are stained by floodwaters and decaying beneath the effects of wakes from passing cars. The century-old, two-story houses have concrete patios and little landscaping — plants are hard to grow in the flood-prone conditions. During high tides that accompany new and full moons, the street can flood on sunny days. Rubber trash cans can be buoyant in floodwaters, tip over and foul the street with spoiled food and bathroom waste, which residents sweep away after floods recede. Cars are frequently destroyed. Many of the houses along Arizona Avenue had to be stripped and renovated after Sandy filled them with floodwaters and coated walls and ceilings with mold. The winter storm that inundated Arizona Avenue in March was a typical one for the region. The nor’easter struck during a full moon, meaning it coincided with some of the highest tides of the month. Floodwaters stopped rising a few inches beneath the DeDomenicises’ front door. Emergency crews patrolled in vehicles built to withstand high water. These kinds of floods are called “nuisance floods” by experts. Nuisance floods are becoming routine features of coastal living around America, and their impacts are difficult to assess. Washington and other major cities could experience an average of one flood caused by tides and storm surges every three days within 30 years, according to a study published by researchers with the nonprofit Union of Concerned Scientists in the journal PLOS One in February. Rain and snow that fall during storms increase flood risks. Residents of Arizona Avenue describe anxiety when tides and storms bring floods, especially if they aren’t home to help protect their possessions. The rising floodwaters can be emotional triggers — reminders of the upheaving effects of floods wrought by major storms like Sandy in late 2012 and Winter Storm Jonas in early 2016. Some of the residents have spent months living in hotels while their homes were repaired following storms. One of Tom Gitto’s children was born while the family was living in a hotel room paid for by the federal government after Sandy. Susan Clayton, a psychology and environmental studies professor who researches psychological responses to climate change at the College of Wooster, a liberal arts college in Ohio, said such triggers can lead to sleeping difficulties, “profound anxiety” and other symptoms. The frequent risk of flooding may also make people constantly fear for their homes and for the security their homes provide. “It tends to be very important to everybody that they have some place that they feel they can relax, where they can be in control,” Clayton said. “Your home is your castle. When your home is threatened, that can really undermine a sense of stability and security. It’s not just the flooding, it’s the idea that it’s your home itself that’s being threatened.” The economic impacts of nuisance floods can also be far-reaching — researchers say they’re more impactful than most government officials assume. “Since they don’t get a lot of attention, we don’t have a data record of nuisance flooding costs,” said Amir AghaKouchak, a University of California, Irvine, scientist who studies hydrology and climatology. AghaKouchak led a study published in the journal Earth’s Future in February that attempted to quantify the economic impacts in large coastal cities. The researchers were hamstrung by the dearth of data. Their preliminary findings, however, suggested that the cumulative economic impacts of nuisance floods might already exceed those of occasional disaster floods in some areas. “There’s a lot of cost associated with this minor event,” AghaKouchak said. “Cities and counties have to send out people with trucks, pumps and so forth, they have to close down streets, build temporary berms.” On Arizona Avenue, residents say they feel abandoned by all levels of government. Like an Appalachian coal town, many here depend upon a single industry — an entertainment sector that’s in decline, anchored by casinos that draw visitors to hotels, arcades, restaurants, gas stations and strip clubs. “They forget about us,” said Christopher Macaluso, a 30-year-old poker dealer who owns a house on Arizona Avenue and grew up nearby. “We’re the city. If they didn’t have the dealers, the dishwashers, the valet guys, the cooks and the housemaids, what have you got? We definitely feel left out.” With casinos operating in nearby Pennsylvania and elsewhere following the lifting of gambling bans, the flow of visitors to Atlantic City has slowed over a decade from a gush to a trickle. Some towering casino buildings stand abandoned, like empty storefronts in a dying downtown. Others are filled well below capacity with gamers and vacationers; their gaudy interiors faded and gloomy. One out of every six jobs in Atlantic City was lost between 2010 and 2016 as nearly 5 percent of the population left, according to the latest regional economic report by New Jersey’s Stockton University, which is building a campus in the city. The number of Atlantic City residents using food stamps rose to 15 percent in 2015, and more than one out of every five children here is now officially living in poverty. President Trump’s construction of two ill-fated casinos in a saturated industry intensified the Atlantic City gaming bubble that began its spectacular burst a decade ago. (As president, Trump is dismantling regulations designed to slow sea rise and other effects of warming.) The city is so broke that its government operations are being overseen by New Jersey. “From the moment they started pulling handles in Pennsylvania, the cash that was pouring into slot machines in Atlantic City started to fall,” said Stockton University’s Oliver Cooke, who compares the city’s economic plight to that of Detroit. “As the economy melted down and the land valuations in the city headed south, the tax base just completely melted away.” Unable to pay for far-reaching measures taken by wealthier waterfront regions, like road-raising in Miami Beach and sweeping marsh restorations in the San Francisco Bay Area, Atlantic City has taken only modest steps to ease flooding. Using funds from a bond sale and state and federal grants, the city has been refurbishing sluice gates in a canal that were built to control floodwaters but haven’t worked in more than half a century. It plans to replace flap valves in two stormwater drains near Arizona Avenue for $16,000 apiece. “We’re treating that money like gold,” said Elizabeth Terenik, who was Atlantic City’s planning director until last month, when she left its shrinking workforce for a job with a flood-prone township nearby. That’s far shy of the tens of millions of dollars being spent just blocks away. The Army Corps is using Sandy recovery money to alleviate hazards in wealthier parts of the city and elsewhere on Absecon Island and in New York and other nearby states, while flooding affecting low-income residents of Arizona Avenue and similar neighborhoods is overlooked. “The Corps does not say, ‘Here’s a problem, and we’re going to fix it’ — somebody has to ask them to help,” said Gerald Galloway, a University of Maryland engineering professor and former Army Corps official. “It depends on a very solid citizen push to get it done. The Corps of Engineers has a backlog of construction awaiting money. You need very strong organizations competing for it.” Coastal New Jersey’s working class have little power in Washington and their cities manage modest budgets. The divide in Atlantic City reflects a grand injustice of global warming — one that’s familiar to Pacific nations facing obliteration from rising seas, and to Alaskan tribes settled by the government on shrinking coasts. While the wealthy may be able to adapt to the effects of climate change, the poor oftentimes cannot. “In some cases, the most vulnerable populations will not be able to move,” said Miyuki Hino, a Stanford PhD candidate who has studied coastal resettlements around the world. “In other cases, they’ll be forced to.”


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.businesswire.com

VOORHEES, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--New Jersey American Water today announced the recipients of its 2017 Environmental Grant Program. The company has awarded $29,000 to the following four noteworthy organizations within its service areas that are engaged in sustainability projects to improve water source protection or watershed protection: Bridgewater Township Environmental Commission has been awarded $6,500 to install a demonstrative native plant garden with bee-friendly habitat and bee-friendly water bath at the Bridgewater Library. This project will provide continuous education to the citizens of the Bridgewater Community as well as the residents of Somerset County. Manasquan Board Riders Club has been awarded $2,500 to establish a year round project aimed at enhancing environmental awareness and stewardship on keeping beaches, parks, coastal waterways and estuaries litter free, titled “Leave Only Your Footprints.” South Orange Township has been awarded $10,000 to build a Rain Park based on the premise of a rain garden that will capture stormwater runoff that normally flows directly into the East Branch of the Rahway River. Rain parks use native plants, infiltration, and innovative design to reduce large amounts of rainwater, create play spaces for kids, relaxing destinations for friends, and examples of sustainability. Stockton University American Association of University Women (AAUW) has been awarded $10,000 to enhance a summer camp course, “Our Water” located at New Jersey’s only TechTrek Camp. The summer camp is for 60 girls nominated as the top science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) students in their middle schools. This program will immerse these students in weeklong hands-on environmental science curriculum, featuring take-home watershed protection projects that each girl can bring back to her home watershed management area. “Now in its ninth year, our environmental grant program has provided more than $254,000 of needed support for 32 projects to help improve, restore and protect our valuable natural resources through partnerships,” stated Anthony Matarazzo, Director of Water Quality and Environmental Compliance. “Each of these organizations has made a commitment to make a difference within the communities we serve and we are proud to support these projects and the people behind them.” For more information on the Environmental Grant Program, visit the company’s website, www.newjerseyamwater.com. New Jersey American Water, a subsidiary of American Water, is the largest investor-owned water utility in the state, providing high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 2.7 million people. More information can be found at www.newjerseyamwater.com. With a history dating back to 1886, American Water (NYSE: AWK) is the largest and most geographically diverse publicly traded U.S. water and wastewater utility company. The company employs 6,800 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and market-based drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 15 million people in 47 states and Ontario, Canada. More information can be found by visiting www.amwater.com.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

The big sabre-toothed cats that roamed Los Angeles 12,000 years ago had bad backs and shoulders, it seems. Meanwhile, the other apex predator that shared its southern California habitat, the dire wolf, was more likely to suffer from headaches and leg pain. The discoveries come from an analysis of thousands of bones from skeletons of these extinct creatures, with the injuries probably sustained as a result of their dining habits. Like other cats, the sabre-toothed Smilodon fatalis ambushed its prey and wrestled them into submission. Modern big cats suffocate their prey, by either biting down on the victim’s snout to clamp it shut or squeezing its throat to crush its trachea so it can’t breathe. Smilodon was more heavily built, and is thought to have used its massive forelimbs to pin down large prey such as bison, horses and camels. It could then quickly kill the animal by ripping out its throat with its long curved canine teeth. Injuries are inevitable in such battles to the death, and are known in modern cats as well as fossils. But no one had looked at enough bones to tell how often they occurred either in the past or present. Most modern museums lack the room to store more than a few complete skeletons from any species, but the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County has a hoard of fossils dug from the famed La Brea tar pits near the city. Blaire Van Valkenburgh, a palaeontologist working on large predatory mammals at the University of California, Los Angeles, mentioned that local resource to her graduate students, and two were eager to investigate. Caitlin Brown found a way to map damaged areas on bones, and she and Mairin Balisi spent six months examining more than 35,000 bones from sabre-toothed tigers and the other apex predator that shared its southern California habitat, the dire wolf. The researchers found injuries on 4.3 per cent of all tiger bones and 2.8 per cent of all wolf bones. The big cats were most likely to injure shoulder and back bones, probably when struggling with big prey. Likewise, injuries to the wolves’ ankles, wrists, and upper necks fit with their dining habits, says Van Valkenburgh. “Dire wolves hunted in packs, which were essentially a running set of jaws,” she says. “They can’t turn their paws inward to wrestle; they have to do everything with their mouths. So we expected to see injuries where they were kicked in the head, and maybe injuries in the limbs, either by being kicked or by tripping while in hot pursuit.” “This is really, really interesting,” says Margaret Lewis, a palaeo-predator researcher at Stockton University in Galloway, New Jersey.  Researchers had suspected that Smilodon ambushed its prey, but had not studied what bones were damaged or how common injuries were. “This is the first real evidence from the animals themselves.” Read more: Los Angeles launches hunt for unknown species hiding in cities; Sabre-toothed ‘bear’ terrorised early humans; Who wants to live alongside sabre-toothed tigers?


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Raisa Ahmad was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which she conducted research and prepared memos for patent litigation cases involving software and security patents, pharmaceuticals, and biomedical devices.  In addition, she has experience preparing claim construction charts, invalidity contentions, and Lanham Act standing memos.  Prior to law school, she was a student engineer and conducted electric-cell substrate impedance sensing analysis for the Center for the Convergence of Physical and Cancer Biology.  Ahmad received her J.D. from the University of Arizona College of Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor for the Arizona Law Review and received the Dean's Achievement Award Scholarship.  She received her B.S.E., magna cum laude, in biomedical engineering from Arizona State University in 2011.  She is admitted to practice in Texas. Brian Apel practices patent litigation, including post-grant proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  He has worked for clients in the mechanical, electrical, and chemical industries and has experience in pre-suit diligence including opinion work, discovery, damages, summary judgment, and appeals.  Apel also has experience in patent prosecution, employment discrimination, and First Amendment law.  Before law school, he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy.  Apel received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Michigan Law School in 2016 and his B.A., with honors, in chemistry from Northwestern University in 2008.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota, the U.S. District Court of Minnesota, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Zoya Kovalenko Brooks focuses her practice on patent litigation, including working on teams for one of the largest high-tech cases in the country pertaining to data transmission and memory allocation technologies.  She was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  While in law school, she served as a legal extern at The Coca-Cola Company in the IP group.  Prior to attending law school, she was an investigator intern at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, where she investigated over 20 potential discrimination cases.  Brooks received her J.D., high honors, Order of the Coif, from Emory University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor for Emory Law Journal and her B.S., high honors, in applied mathematics from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Georgia. Holly Chamberlain focuses on patent prosecution in a variety of areas including the biomedical, mechanical, and electromechanical arts.  She was previously a summer associate with the firm.  She received her J.D. from Boston College Law School in 2016 where she was an editor of Intellectual Property and Technology Forum and her B.S. in biological engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Thomas Chisena previously was a summer associate with the firm where he worked on patent, trade secret, and trademark litigation.  Prior to attending law school, he instructed in biology, environmental science, and anatomy & physiology.  Chisena received his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where he was executive editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law, Vol. 37.  He also received his Wharton Certificate in Business Management in December 2015.  He received his B.S. in biology from Pennsylvania State University in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Claire Collins was a legal intern for the Middlesex County District Attorney's Office during law school.  She has experience researching and drafting motions and legal memorandums.  Collins received her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2016 where she was a Dillard Fellow, her M.A. from Texas A&M University in 2012, and her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College in 2006.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts. Ronald Golden, III previously served as a courtroom deputy to U.S. District Judge Leonard P. Stark and U.S. Magistrate Judge Mary Pat Thynge.  He received his J.D. from Widener University School of Law in 2012 where he was on the staff of Widener Law Review and was awarded "Best Overall Competitor" in the American Association for Justice Mock Trial.  He received his B.A. from Stockton University in political science and criminal justice in 2005.  He is admitted to practice in Delaware and New Jersey. Dr. Casey Kraning-Rush was previously a summer associate with the firm, where she focused primarily on patent litigation.  She received her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where she was managing editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and awarded "Best Advocate" and "Best Appellee Brief" at the Western Regional of the AIPLA Giles Rich Moot Court.  She earned her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2013 and has extensive experience researching cellular and molecular medicine.  She received her M.S. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2012 and her B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Butler University in 2008.  She is admitted to practice in Delaware. Alana Mannigé was previously a summer associate with the firm and has worked on patent prosecution, patent litigation, trademark, and trade secret matters.  During law school, she served as a judicial extern to the Honorable Judge James Donato of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.  She also worked closely with biotech startup companies as part of her work at the UC Hastings Startup Legal Garage.  Prior to attending law school, Mannigé worked as a patent examiner at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  She received her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor of Hastings Science & Technology Law Journal.  She received her M.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 2010 and her B.A., cum laude, in chemistry from Clark University in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in California and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Will Orlady was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he collaborated to research and brief a matter on appeal to the Federal Circuit.  He also analyzed novel issues related to inter partes review proceedings, drafted memoranda on substantive patent law issues, and crafted infringement contentions.  During law school, Orlady was a research assistant to Professor Kristin Hickman, researching and writing on administrative law.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Minnesota Law School in 2016 where he was lead articles editor of the Minnesota Journal of Law, Science and Technology and his B.A. in neuroscience from the University of Southern California in 2012.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota and the U.S. District Court of Minnesota. Jessica Perry previously was a summer associate and law clerk with the firm, where she worked on patent and trademark litigation.  During law school, she was an IP & licensing analyst, in which she assisted with drafting and tracking material transfer agreement and inter-institutional agreements.  She also worked with the Boston University Civil Litigation Clinic representing pro bono clients with unemployment, social security, housing, and family law matters.  Prior to law school, she was a senior mechanical design engineer for an aerospace company.  She received her J.D. from Boston University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor of the Journal of Science and Technology Law, her M.Eng. in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2009, and her B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Taufiq Ramji was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he researched legal issues that related to ongoing litigation and drafted responses to discovery requests and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office actions.  Prior to attending law school, Ramji worked as a software developer.  He received his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 2016.  He is admitted to practice in California. Charles Reese has worked on matters before various federal district courts, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.  His litigation experience includes drafting dispositive, evidentiary, and procedural motions; arguing in federal district court; and participating in other stages of litigation including discovery, appeal, and settlement negotiation.  Previously, he was a summer associate with the firm.  He received his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Harvard Law Review, his A.M. in organic and organometallic chemistry from Harvard University in 2012, and his B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Furman University in 2010.  He is admitted to practice in Georgia and the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. Ethan Rubin was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  During law school, he worked at a corporation's intellectual property department in which he prepared and prosecuted patents relating to data storage systems.  He also worked as a student attorney, advocating for local pro bono clients on various housing and family law matters.  Rubin received his J.D., cum laude, from Boston College Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Boston College Law Review, his M.S. in computer science from Boston University in 2013, and his B.A., magna cum laude, in criminal justice from George Washington University in 2011.  He is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Pooya Shoghi focuses on patent prosecution, including portfolio management, application drafting, client counseling, and standard essential patent development.  Prior to joining the firm, he was a patent practitioner at a multinational technology company, where he was responsible for the filing and prosecution of U.S. patent applications.  During law school, he was a legal intern at a major computer networking technology company, where he focused on issues of intellectual property licensing in the software arena.  He received his J.D., with honors, from Emory University School of Law in 2014 where he was executive managing editor of Emory Corporate Governance and Accountability Review.  He received his B.S., summa cum laude, in computer science (2015) and his B.A., summa cum laude, in political science (2011) from Georgia State University.  He is admitted to practice in New York and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Tucker Terhufen focuses his practice on patent litigation in federal district courts as well as before the International Trade Commission for clients in the medical devices, life sciences, chemical, and electronics industries.  Prior to joining Fish, he served as judicial extern to the Honorable David G. Campbell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona and to the Honorable Mary H. Murguia of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from Arizona State University, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law in 2016 where he was note and comment editor of Arizona State Law Journal and received a Certificate in Law, Science, and Technology with a specialization in Intellectual Property.  He received his B.S.E., summa cum laude, in chemical engineering from Arizona State University.  He is admitted to practice in California. Laura Whitworth was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, she served as a judicial intern for the Honorable Judge Jimmie V. Reyna of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.  She received her J.D., cum laude, from American University Washington College of Law in 2016 where she was senior federal circuit editor of American University Law Review and senior patent editor of Intellectual Property Brief.  She received her B.S. in chemistry from the College of William & Mary in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Virginia, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Jack Wilson was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, he served as a judicial extern for the Honorable Mark Davis of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.  Prior to attending law school, he served in the United States Army.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, from William & Mary Law School in 2016 where he was on the editorial staff of William & Mary Law Review and his B.S. in computer engineering from the University of Virginia in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Virginia and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Fish & Richardson is a global patent prosecution, intellectual property litigation, and commercial litigation law firm with more than 400 attorneys and technology specialists in the U.S. and Europe.  Our success is rooted in our creative and inclusive culture, which values the diversity of people, experiences, and perspectives.  Fish is the #1 U.S. patent litigation firm, handling nearly three times as many cases than its nearest competitor; a powerhouse patent prosecution firm; a top-tier trademark and copyright firm; and the #1 firm at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, with more cases than any other firm.  Since 1878, Fish attorneys have been winning cases worth billions in controversy – often by making new law – for the world's most innovative and influential technology leaders.  For more information, visit https://www.fr.com or follow us at @FishRichardson. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fish--richardson-announces-18-recent-associates-300447237.html


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Northcentral University (NCU), a global online graduate-focused university, is pleased to announce that Dr. Laurie Shanderson has joined NCU as the Founding Dean of its new School of Health Sciences. Before taking this position, Shanderson served as both Associate Dean and Assistant Dean for the School of Health Sciences at Stockton University in Galloway, New Jersey. She received a Bachelor in Health and Human Services from the State University of New York at Buffalo, a Master of Public Administration from Pace University and a PhD in Health Services from Walden University. Shanderson is tasked with developing the School of Health Sciences for NCU. “My goal is to build quality accredited programs that prepare students for the interdisciplinary and interprofessional health care field,” explained Shanderson. During her career, she has worked at a variety of health institutions including health insurance organizations, non-profit health organizations, a research institute and higher education. Shanderson has a strong background in healthcare as well as distance education, program development, accreditation, cultural competence/diversity, and health administration/management. Shanderson is the current Chair of the Cultural Perspectives Forum for the Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) and former Chair and Chair-Elect of the AUPHA Innovative Teaching Faculty Network. She is a founding member of the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) Health Informatics Information Technology section, as well as the current section treasurer, and was recently awarded for Outstanding Leadership Service. About Northcentral University Founded in 1996, Northcentral University is a regionally accredited, private, online and graduate-focused university serving professionals globally. NCU offers doctoral, master’s and bachelor’s degrees in business and technology management, education, and psychology, as well as doctoral and master’s degrees in marriage and family therapy. Without physical residency requirements, courses are taught one-to-one by an NCU professor, all of whom have doctoral degrees. Northcentral University is regionally accredited by WASC Senior College and University Commission (WASC), http://www.wascsenior.org. For more information, visit http://www.ncu.edu/ or call 866.776.0331.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 597.99K | Year: 2011

The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey provides twenty-five S-STEM scholarships each year for talented yet financially disadvantaged students pursuing baccalaureate degrees in computer science and information systems, engineering, computational science or mathematics. The program increases both undergraduate retention and placements in graduate schools or STEM careers. Special outreach activities include awareness campaigns, faculty involvement with high schools/county colleges and a computer fair. Special mentoring is provided to attract and retain female CSIS majors. Academic support is provided by especially designed courses such as Bridges Connecting Computer Science and Calculus which has resulted in a 20% improvement in performance in calculus. The Women in Computing course targets first year students to increase and retain female majors. Among the women who intend to major in CSIS, 100% of those in this course are still CSIS majors at the end of the second year and beyond. Tutoring in programming, mentoring and internship and research experiences are also offered.

This program builds on a previous successful NSF project which resulted in a 96% retention rate and a 10% increase in GPAs among participating students. Every graduate found a major-related job or acceptance into graduate school. Seventy-three percent of Stockton students qualify for financial need and 26% are first-generation college students. This scholarship program enables students to work less and focus on academics.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

This July 1, 2016, photo shows striking union members on the picket line shortly after a strike began against the Trump Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic City, N.J. On Wednesday, March 1, 2017, owner Carl Icahn reached a deal to sell the casino, which shut down on Oct. 10, 2016, to Hard Rock International and two New Jersey investors. The sale price was not divulged. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry) ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Billionaire investor Carl Icahn reached a deal Wednesday to sell the shuttered Trump Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic City to Hard Rock International and two New Jersey investors. The sale comes four months after Icahn closed it amid a crippling strike. "We are excited to be part of this revitalization of Atlantic City creating thousands of jobs to help local employment," Jim Allen, chairman of Hard Rock International, said in a statement. "We are 100 percent convinced Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Atlantic City will be a success." He said the company plans to invest $300 million in renovating and rebranding the property. Icahn, who also owns Atlantic City's Tropicana Casino and Resort, said he decided one casino in town is enough. He said in January he had lost about $300 million owning the Taj Mahal, and would be delighted if he could sell it for half that amount. "We ... are extremely happy with our ownership of the Tropicana Casino and Resort, and after considerable analysis and deliberation we determined that we only wanted to own one operating casino property in Atlantic City," he said in a statement Wednesday night. "A sale of the Taj Mahal therefore represents the optimal outcome for us. We wish Hard Rock and its partners the best of luck with the Taj Mahal." Hard Rock has proposed building a major casino resort in northern New Jersey at the Meadowlands racetrack with its owner Jeff Gural. But voters overwhelmingly rejected a statewide referendum last November that would have authorized casino gambling to expand beyond Atlantic City, and the issue cannot be revisited for at least two years. It was not immediately clear whether Hard Rock still intends to seek a Meadowlands casino. The two investors are Joseph Jingoli, who is working on a new campus for Stockton University in Atlantic City, and Jack Morris, CEO of Edgewood Properties. "This project is led by a proven leader in gaming, brings hundreds of million dollars in new investment, creates hundreds of construction positions, countless positions within the Hard Rock Casino Hotel and will bring thousands and thousands of new visitors to this great city," Jingoli said. "This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be a part of revitalizing one of our nation's most iconic destinations," Morris added. Hard Rock has long toyed with the idea of opening a casino resort in Atlantic City. In 2011, the company proposed — and soon abandoned — a music-themed casino resort at the southern end of the Boardwalk. Icahn said the sale does not include the shuttered Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino, which closed in 2014. Icahn said he is still trying to sell that property. President Trump, who at the time was a Manhattan real estate mogul, dubbed the Taj Mahal "the eighth wonder of the world" when it opened in 1990. But within a year it was in bankruptcy, the victim of unsustainably high levels of debt taken on during its construction. Trump cut most of his ties with Atlantic City in 2009, stepping down from the company he once ran, Trump Entertainment Resorts, most of which was then controlled by bondholders who swapped their debt for equity in the company during bankruptcy. Trump retained only a 10 percent stake in the company in return for the right to use his name, but that was wiped out last year when Icahn acquired the company from its latest Chapter 11 filing. Local 54 of the Unite-HERE union went on strike against the Taj Mahal on July 1 when it could not reach a new contract with Icahn to restore benefits that Trump Entertainment got a bankruptcy court judge to terminate in October 2014. Losing millions of dollars a month, Icahn decided to close the casino on Oct. 10, putting nearly 3,000 workers out of jobs. Many of those workers are expected to be rehired when the casino opens, which might not happen until the summer of 2018.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: news.europawire.eu

NEW YORK, NY, 02-Nov-2016 — /EuropaWire/ — Holly Kingsley has been named Chief Operations Officer (COO) at Pace, a WPP company based in New York City, with offices in New Jersey and Florida. Pace is a full-service branding and marketing agency with a venerable track record of over six decades of innovation in developing successful campaigns for residential and commercial real estate clients. Kingsley joined Pace in 1997 as an account executive. Over the years, she has developed expertise in marketing for residential communities and the new-home market. At Pace, Kingsley has risen through the ranks to the role of Senior Vice President and now, COO. In her new position, Kingsley will oversee key agency operations and logistics, while continuing her responsibilities for supervising strategic planning and providing senior-level management for many of the agency’s key clients. According to Mary Ellen Howe, COO, Specialist Communications, North America for WPP Group, “Holly has been prepared for this role for years, so it’s a very natural transition for her to step into the position now. I can’t think of anyone who knows the ins and outs of Pace better than Holly. She has worked at Pace for nearly two decades in so many vital roles, growing and advancing in her responsibilities and capabilities and she represents some of the agency’s most critical clients.” “One of the things I love about Holly is her reputation as a true problem solver,” said Cara Faske, President and CEO of Pace. “She has a hands-on approach and a ‘can-do’ attitude, which is perfect for this role as COO. I’m so proud to work alongside her and excited for what she will bring to this new position, as part of our strategic leadership team.” Kingsley is a graduate of Stockton University and also attended the University of Tennessee, with a background in communications and public relations. “I’m honored to be trusted in this new position at Pace and excited to work with Cara to lead our team at this new juncture in the agency’s history,” Kingsley commented. “I’m looking forward to streamlining many of our internal procedures to enhance our efficiency and our creativity. I’m also particularly excited about spearheading our efforts to expand our service to clients in central and southern New Jersey and the Philadelphia-Delaware Valley markets. We have such a storied history in the industry and have established a consistent and powerful presence in the market for nearly seventy years. At the same time, it’s been great evolving our brand over the past couple of years to meet the challenges of a changing world and re-introducing Pace to a new generation of clients.” Founded in 1949, Pace was acquired in 1986 by WPP, the world’s largest communications services group with billings of US$73 billion and revenues of US$19 billion. WPP is parent to some of the most prominent and successful firms in the field, including J. Walter Thompson, Ogilvy and Mather, Grey and Hill and Knowlton. In addition to specializing in residential and commercial real estate, the agency has also served a variety of other sectors including hospitals and healthcare, hospitality, education, and non-profit organizations. Pace is parent company to Green Integrated Marketing Services in Boca Raton, Florida; and Stalder/Green in Orlando, Florida. PACE’s 3D arm is Agency Red. For more information, visit paceadv.com.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.newscientist.com

Methane is gushing forth from hundreds of newly-discovered deep-sea vents all along the US’s western seaboard. “It appears that the entire coast off Washington, Oregon and California is a giant methane seep,” says Robert Ballard, founder and director of the Ocean Exploration Trust in Connecticut. In all, 500 new seeps were discovered by submersibles operated from the trust’s ship, Nautilus (see video below). The discovery will be presented this week in New York at the National Ocean Exploration Forum. However, there’s still work to be done to pin down the exact composition of the bubbles coming from the seeps. “Members of our group are analysing the samples taken in June for a wide range of gases,” says Robert Embley, chief scientist on the Nautilus. Embley says that previous samples from similar sites were mostly methane, but methane hydrate – made from water and methane – can form too. Methane has the potential to accelerate global warming because it traps heat 40 times as effectively as carbon dioxide. Knowing how much is gushing out of the seeps and what amount makes it into the atmosphere should enable estimates of their impact on global warming in the future. “The first step to finding out is getting a baseline of what’s coming out of the seafloor at present,” says Embley. The team thinks it is likely that they will find yet more seeps on the seafloor off the eastern US. “We hope there will be opportunities for more mapping in the next couple of field seasons to get a more complete baseline of sites,” says Embley. Also being showcased at the National Ocean Exploration Forum this week is the amazing variety of rare and unusual sea creatures. They were filmed this year in the Mariana Trench by submersibles operated from the Okeanos, a deep-sea exploration ship managed by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Those caught on camera include glowing orb-like creatures (see video below), spectacular Dracula squids,  sea cucumbers that resemble Mary Poppins carrying an umbrella, and a distinctive purple relative of the cuttlefish, so cute it has been dubbed the cuddle fish. Curiously, many are purple, but no one knows why. “There may not really be many deep-sea animals that are purple, they just seem to be the ones that get our attention,” says Tara Luke of Stockton University in New Jersey. Read more: New Arctic life on barren seabed thrives on methane jets

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