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News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.newscientist.com

The big sabre-toothed cats that roamed Los Angeles 12,000 years ago had bad backs and shoulders, it seems. Meanwhile, the other apex predator that shared its southern California habitat, the dire wolf, was more likely to suffer from headaches and leg pain. The discoveries come from an analysis of thousands of bones from skeletons of these extinct creatures, with the injuries probably sustained as a result of their dining habits. Like other cats, the sabre-toothed Smilodon fatalis ambushed its prey and wrestled them into submission. Modern big cats suffocate their prey, by either biting down on the victim’s snout to clamp it shut or squeezing its throat to crush its trachea so it can’t breathe. Smilodon was more heavily built, and is thought to have used its massive forelimbs to pin down large prey such as bison, horses and camels. It could then quickly kill the animal by ripping out its throat with its long curved canine teeth. Injuries are inevitable in such battles to the death, and are known in modern cats as well as fossils. But no one had looked at enough bones to tell how often they occurred either in the past or present. Most modern museums lack the room to store more than a few complete skeletons from any species, but the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County has a hoard of fossils dug from the famed La Brea tar pits near the city. Blaire Van Valkenburgh, a palaeontologist working on large predatory mammals at the University of California, Los Angeles, mentioned that local resource to her graduate students, and two were eager to investigate. Caitlin Brown found a way to map damaged areas on bones, and she and Mairin Balisi spent six months examining more than 35,000 bones from sabre-toothed tigers and the other apex predator that shared its southern California habitat, the dire wolf. The researchers found injuries on 4.3 per cent of all tiger bones and 2.8 per cent of all wolf bones. The big cats were most likely to injure shoulder and back bones, probably when struggling with big prey. Likewise, injuries to the wolves’ ankles, wrists, and upper necks fit with their dining habits, says Van Valkenburgh. “Dire wolves hunted in packs, which were essentially a running set of jaws,” she says. “They can’t turn their paws inward to wrestle; they have to do everything with their mouths. So we expected to see injuries where they were kicked in the head, and maybe injuries in the limbs, either by being kicked or by tripping while in hot pursuit.” “This is really, really interesting,” says Margaret Lewis, a palaeo-predator researcher at Stockton University in Galloway, New Jersey.  Researchers had suspected that Smilodon ambushed its prey, but had not studied what bones were damaged or how common injuries were. “This is the first real evidence from the animals themselves.” Read more: Los Angeles launches hunt for unknown species hiding in cities; Sabre-toothed ‘bear’ terrorised early humans; Who wants to live alongside sabre-toothed tigers?


News Article | April 27, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

Raisa Ahmad was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which she conducted research and prepared memos for patent litigation cases involving software and security patents, pharmaceuticals, and biomedical devices.  In addition, she has experience preparing claim construction charts, invalidity contentions, and Lanham Act standing memos.  Prior to law school, she was a student engineer and conducted electric-cell substrate impedance sensing analysis for the Center for the Convergence of Physical and Cancer Biology.  Ahmad received her J.D. from the University of Arizona College of Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor for the Arizona Law Review and received the Dean's Achievement Award Scholarship.  She received her B.S.E., magna cum laude, in biomedical engineering from Arizona State University in 2011.  She is admitted to practice in Texas. Brian Apel practices patent litigation, including post-grant proceedings before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  He has worked for clients in the mechanical, electrical, and chemical industries and has experience in pre-suit diligence including opinion work, discovery, damages, summary judgment, and appeals.  Apel also has experience in patent prosecution, employment discrimination, and First Amendment law.  Before law school, he served as an officer in the U.S. Navy.  Apel received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Michigan Law School in 2016 and his B.A., with honors, in chemistry from Northwestern University in 2008.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota, the U.S. District Court of Minnesota, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Zoya Kovalenko Brooks focuses her practice on patent litigation, including working on teams for one of the largest high-tech cases in the country pertaining to data transmission and memory allocation technologies.  She was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  While in law school, she served as a legal extern at The Coca-Cola Company in the IP group.  Prior to attending law school, she was an investigator intern at the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, where she investigated over 20 potential discrimination cases.  Brooks received her J.D., high honors, Order of the Coif, from Emory University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor for Emory Law Journal and her B.S., high honors, in applied mathematics from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Georgia. Holly Chamberlain focuses on patent prosecution in a variety of areas including the biomedical, mechanical, and electromechanical arts.  She was previously a summer associate with the firm.  She received her J.D. from Boston College Law School in 2016 where she was an editor of Intellectual Property and Technology Forum and her B.S. in biological engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Thomas Chisena previously was a summer associate with the firm where he worked on patent, trade secret, and trademark litigation.  Prior to attending law school, he instructed in biology, environmental science, and anatomy & physiology.  Chisena received his J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where he was executive editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and University of Pennsylvania Journal of International Law, Vol. 37.  He also received his Wharton Certificate in Business Management in December 2015.  He received his B.S. in biology from Pennsylvania State University in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Claire Collins was a legal intern for the Middlesex County District Attorney's Office during law school.  She has experience researching and drafting motions and legal memorandums.  Collins received her J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law in 2016 where she was a Dillard Fellow, her M.A. from Texas A&M University in 2012, and her B.A. from Bryn Mawr College in 2006.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts. Ronald Golden, III previously served as a courtroom deputy to U.S. District Judge Leonard P. Stark and U.S. Magistrate Judge Mary Pat Thynge.  He received his J.D. from Widener University School of Law in 2012 where he was on the staff of Widener Law Review and was awarded "Best Overall Competitor" in the American Association for Justice Mock Trial.  He received his B.A. from Stockton University in political science and criminal justice in 2005.  He is admitted to practice in Delaware and New Jersey. Dr. Casey Kraning-Rush was previously a summer associate with the firm, where she focused primarily on patent litigation.  She received her J.D. from the University of Pennsylvania Law School in 2016 where she was managing editor of Penn Intellectual Property Group Online and awarded "Best Advocate" and "Best Appellee Brief" at the Western Regional of the AIPLA Giles Rich Moot Court.  She earned her Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2013 and has extensive experience researching cellular and molecular medicine.  She received her M.S. in biomedical engineering from Cornell University in 2012 and her B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Butler University in 2008.  She is admitted to practice in Delaware. Alana Mannigé was previously a summer associate with the firm and has worked on patent prosecution, patent litigation, trademark, and trade secret matters.  During law school, she served as a judicial extern to the Honorable Judge James Donato of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California.  She also worked closely with biotech startup companies as part of her work at the UC Hastings Startup Legal Garage.  Prior to attending law school, Mannigé worked as a patent examiner at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.  She received her J.D., magna cum laude, from the University of California, Hastings College of the Law in 2016 where she was senior articles editor of Hastings Science & Technology Law Journal.  She received her M.S. in chemistry from the University of Michigan in 2010 and her B.A., cum laude, in chemistry from Clark University in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in California and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Will Orlady was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he collaborated to research and brief a matter on appeal to the Federal Circuit.  He also analyzed novel issues related to inter partes review proceedings, drafted memoranda on substantive patent law issues, and crafted infringement contentions.  During law school, Orlady was a research assistant to Professor Kristin Hickman, researching and writing on administrative law.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from the University of Minnesota Law School in 2016 where he was lead articles editor of the Minnesota Journal of Law, Science and Technology and his B.A. in neuroscience from the University of Southern California in 2012.  He is admitted to practice in Minnesota and the U.S. District Court of Minnesota. Jessica Perry previously was a summer associate and law clerk with the firm, where she worked on patent and trademark litigation.  During law school, she was an IP & licensing analyst, in which she assisted with drafting and tracking material transfer agreement and inter-institutional agreements.  She also worked with the Boston University Civil Litigation Clinic representing pro bono clients with unemployment, social security, housing, and family law matters.  Prior to law school, she was a senior mechanical design engineer for an aerospace company.  She received her J.D. from Boston University School of Law in 2016 where she was articles editor of the Journal of Science and Technology Law, her M.Eng. in mechanical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 2009, and her B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst in 2007.  She is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and the U.S. District Court of Massachusetts. Taufiq Ramji was previously a summer associate with the firm, in which he researched legal issues that related to ongoing litigation and drafted responses to discovery requests and U.S. Patent and Trademark Office actions.  Prior to attending law school, Ramji worked as a software developer.  He received his J.D. from Harvard Law School in 2016.  He is admitted to practice in California. Charles Reese has worked on matters before various federal district courts, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, and the Patent Trial and Appeal Board.  His litigation experience includes drafting dispositive, evidentiary, and procedural motions; arguing in federal district court; and participating in other stages of litigation including discovery, appeal, and settlement negotiation.  Previously, he was a summer associate with the firm.  He received his J.D., cum laude, from Harvard Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Harvard Law Review, his A.M. in organic and organometallic chemistry from Harvard University in 2012, and his B.S., summa cum laude, in chemistry from Furman University in 2010.  He is admitted to practice in Georgia and the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia. Ethan Rubin was previously a summer associate and law clerk with the firm.  During law school, he worked at a corporation's intellectual property department in which he prepared and prosecuted patents relating to data storage systems.  He also worked as a student attorney, advocating for local pro bono clients on various housing and family law matters.  Rubin received his J.D., cum laude, from Boston College Law School in 2016 where he was articles editor of Boston College Law Review, his M.S. in computer science from Boston University in 2013, and his B.A., magna cum laude, in criminal justice from George Washington University in 2011.  He is admitted to practice in Massachusetts and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Pooya Shoghi focuses on patent prosecution, including portfolio management, application drafting, client counseling, and standard essential patent development.  Prior to joining the firm, he was a patent practitioner at a multinational technology company, where he was responsible for the filing and prosecution of U.S. patent applications.  During law school, he was a legal intern at a major computer networking technology company, where he focused on issues of intellectual property licensing in the software arena.  He received his J.D., with honors, from Emory University School of Law in 2014 where he was executive managing editor of Emory Corporate Governance and Accountability Review.  He received his B.S., summa cum laude, in computer science (2015) and his B.A., summa cum laude, in political science (2011) from Georgia State University.  He is admitted to practice in New York and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Tucker Terhufen focuses his practice on patent litigation in federal district courts as well as before the International Trade Commission for clients in the medical devices, life sciences, chemical, and electronics industries.  Prior to joining Fish, he served as judicial extern to the Honorable David G. Campbell of the U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona and to the Honorable Mary H. Murguia of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, Order of the Coif, from Arizona State University, Sandra Day O'Connor College of Law in 2016 where he was note and comment editor of Arizona State Law Journal and received a Certificate in Law, Science, and Technology with a specialization in Intellectual Property.  He received his B.S.E., summa cum laude, in chemical engineering from Arizona State University.  He is admitted to practice in California. Laura Whitworth was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, she served as a judicial intern for the Honorable Judge Jimmie V. Reyna of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit.  She received her J.D., cum laude, from American University Washington College of Law in 2016 where she was senior federal circuit editor of American University Law Review and senior patent editor of Intellectual Property Brief.  She received her B.S. in chemistry from the College of William & Mary in 2013.  She is admitted to practice in Virginia, the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia, and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Jack Wilson was previously a summer associate with the firm.  During law school, he served as a judicial extern for the Honorable Mark Davis of the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Virginia.  Prior to attending law school, he served in the United States Army.  He received his J.D., magna cum laude, from William & Mary Law School in 2016 where he was on the editorial staff of William & Mary Law Review and his B.S. in computer engineering from the University of Virginia in 2009.  He is admitted to practice in Virginia and before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. Fish & Richardson is a global patent prosecution, intellectual property litigation, and commercial litigation law firm with more than 400 attorneys and technology specialists in the U.S. and Europe.  Our success is rooted in our creative and inclusive culture, which values the diversity of people, experiences, and perspectives.  Fish is the #1 U.S. patent litigation firm, handling nearly three times as many cases than its nearest competitor; a powerhouse patent prosecution firm; a top-tier trademark and copyright firm; and the #1 firm at the Patent Trial and Appeal Board, with more cases than any other firm.  Since 1878, Fish attorneys have been winning cases worth billions in controversy – often by making new law – for the world's most innovative and influential technology leaders.  For more information, visit https://www.fr.com or follow us at @FishRichardson. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/fish--richardson-announces-18-recent-associates-300447237.html


News Article | December 19, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

NEW PORT RICHEY, Fla.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Manitowoc Foodservice, Inc. (NYSE: MFS), announced today that Maurice D. Jones, Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary, will be retiring on January 2, 2017. Jones, 56, elected to join Manitowoc Foodservice earlier this year as it was spun off from The Manitowoc Company, Inc., where he previously was their Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary since 1999. “I congratulate Maurice on his upcoming retirement and thank him for his strong support during our spin-off and for establishing a strong corporate governance structure during our first year as an independent company,” said Hubertus Muehlhaeuser, Manitowoc Foodservice’s President and CEO. “Maurice’s leadership, legal expertise, and steadying influence made him an integral part of our management team.” As part of the company’s succession planning process, Joel H. Horn will be promoted to Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary effective January 2, 2017. Horn, 48, is currently Vice President, Associate General Counsel and Assistant Secretary of Manitowoc Foodservice. Horn joined The Manitowoc Company, Inc. in 2008 as Associate General Counsel and held that role until joining Manitowoc Foodservice during the spin-off earlier this year. Prior to Manitowoc, Horn was Senior Counsel and General Counsel for Enodis, PLC from 2004 until 2008, and was Associate General Counsel for Mitsubishi Power Systems, Inc. from 2000 through 2004. Horn holds a Bachelor degree in Political Science and Government from Stockton University in Pomona, New Jersey, and a JD law degree from New England Law in Boston, Massachusetts. “Joel has more than twelve years of experience in the foodservice equipment industry and continuity with Manitowoc Foodservice through its prior history as Enodis, then as a division of Manitowoc,” said Muehlhaeuser. “Joel’s passion for our business and his collaborative efforts with our leaders around the world make him ideally suited for this new role.” Manitowoc Foodservice, Inc. designs, manufactures and supplies best-in-class food and beverage equipment for the global commercial foodservice market, offering customers unparalleled operator and patron insights, collaborative kitchen solutions, culinary expertise and world-class implementation support and service. Headquartered in the Tampa Bay area, Florida, and operating 19 manufacturing facilities throughout the Americas, Europe and Asia, the company sells through a global network of over 3,000 distributors and dealers in over 100 countries. The company has approximately 5,500 employees and generated sales of $1.57 billion in 2015. Its portfolio of 23 award-winning brands includes Cleveland™, Convotherm®, Delfield®, Fabristeel™, Frymaster®, Garland®, INDUCS™, Kolpak®, Koolaire®, Lincoln®, Manitowoc® Beverage Systems, Manitowoc® Ice, Merrychef®, Multiplex®, Servend® and Welbilt®. For more information, visit www.mtwfs.com.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Northcentral University (NCU), a global online graduate-focused university, is pleased to announce that Dr. Laurie Shanderson has joined NCU as the Founding Dean of its new School of Health Sciences. Before taking this position, Shanderson served as both Associate Dean and Assistant Dean for the School of Health Sciences at Stockton University in Galloway, New Jersey. She received a Bachelor in Health and Human Services from the State University of New York at Buffalo, a Master of Public Administration from Pace University and a PhD in Health Services from Walden University. Shanderson is tasked with developing the School of Health Sciences for NCU. “My goal is to build quality accredited programs that prepare students for the interdisciplinary and interprofessional health care field,” explained Shanderson. During her career, she has worked at a variety of health institutions including health insurance organizations, non-profit health organizations, a research institute and higher education. Shanderson has a strong background in healthcare as well as distance education, program development, accreditation, cultural competence/diversity, and health administration/management. Shanderson is the current Chair of the Cultural Perspectives Forum for the Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) and former Chair and Chair-Elect of the AUPHA Innovative Teaching Faculty Network. She is a founding member of the American Public Health Association’s (APHA) Health Informatics Information Technology section, as well as the current section treasurer, and was recently awarded for Outstanding Leadership Service. About Northcentral University Founded in 1996, Northcentral University is a regionally accredited, private, online and graduate-focused university serving professionals globally. NCU offers doctoral, master’s and bachelor’s degrees in business and technology management, education, and psychology, as well as doctoral and master’s degrees in marriage and family therapy. Without physical residency requirements, courses are taught one-to-one by an NCU professor, all of whom have doctoral degrees. Northcentral University is regionally accredited by WASC Senior College and University Commission (WASC), http://www.wascsenior.org. For more information, visit http://www.ncu.edu/ or call 866.776.0331.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J., Nov. 02, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The New Jersey Hall of Fame (NJHOF) has announced 50 nominees in five categories for its Class of 2016: Arts & Letters, Enterprise, Performing Arts, Public Service and Sports. Public voting is now underway online at njhalloffame.org/2016-nominees/. The 9th class of inductees will be announced in December, and the formal induction ceremony will take place on Sunday, May 7, 2017 at the Asbury Park Convention Hall. “Choosing just 50 nominees for the Public Vote has proven to be a challenge over the years. There are so many incredible New Jerseyans who have made their mark on our state, our country and the world,” said NJHOF Commission Chairman Bart Oates. “This year marks our ninth official induction ceremony,” added Steve Edwards, President of the New Jersey Hall of Fame Foundation. “Each year the event has gotten bigger and better, and we’re looking forward to the best one yet in 2017.” The public is encouraged to visit the NJ Hall of Fame website to cast their vote for a nominee in each of the five categories listed below. Full biographies of the nominees can be found at njhalloffame.org/2016-nominees/. ARTS & LETTERS Peter Benchley, author of Jaws; Anthony Bourdain, chef, author and TV personality; Carol Higgins Clark, author of Regan Reilly series; Stephen Crane, author of Red Badge of Courage; Connie Chung, journalist, news anchor and reporter on NBC, CBS, ABC, CNN and MSNBC; Joyce Kilmer, American journalist and poet, author of Trees; Fran Lebowitz, author and public speaker, known as the modern-day Dorothy Parker; John Nash, mathematician and fundamental contributor to game theory, differential geometry and the study of partial differential equations; Charles Osgood, host of CBS News Sunday Morning since 1994;  and George Segal, printer and sculptor associated with the Pop Art movement. ENTERPRISE James Burke, CEO of Johnson & Johnson; Doris Duke, heiress, horticulturalist and art collector; Steve Forbes, editor-in-chief of Forbes; Mark & Scott Kelly, the only siblings to have both traveled in space; Sam Halpern, President of Atlantic Realty and Holocaust survivor, author of Darkness and Hope; Woody Johnson, grandson of Robert Wood Johnson, businessman and philanthropist; Alfred Koeppe, former President and COO of Bell Atlantic and PSE&G, current President of the Newark Alliance; Henry Rowan, built the first induction furnace, benefactor of Rowan University; Arthur F. Ryan, first outsider to become CEO of Prudential Insurance; and Buddy Valastro, star of Cake Boss. PERFORMING ARTS Jason Alexander, George Costanza in Seinfeld; David Copperfield, world famous illusionist; George Benson, Grammy award winning musician, known for his hit “On Broadway;” Connie Francis, singer, composer, actress, entertainer and publisher; Ed Harris, three-time nominee for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor in Apollo 13, The Truman Show and The Hours; Wyclef Jean, Haitian rapper, musician and actor; Ray Liotta, actor known for his roles in Goodfellas and Field of Dreams; Kelly Ripa, played Hayley Vaughn Santos for 12 years on All my Children, co-host of Live! For the past 15 years; Nancy Sinatra, singer and actress, daughter of Frank Sinatra; and Kevin Spacey, two-time Academy Award winning actor, star of Netflix hit series House of Cards. PUBLIC SERVICE Aaron Burr, Continental Army officer, lawyer and politician; Milton Friedman, Nobel Prize winning economist, statistician and writer; Edith Savage Jennings, civil rights activist; Phillip Kearny, United States Army officer, commanded the First New Jersey Brigade; Clara Maass, died as a result of volunteering for medical experiments to study yellow fever, which led to a ban on using humans for medical experiments; Peace Pilgrim, non-denominational spiritual teacher, mystic, vegetarian activist and peace activist; Molly Pitcher, carried water to soldiers during the American Revolutionary War’s Battle of Monmouth, took over operation of her husbands cannon when he collapsed; Antonin Scalia, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, longest-serving justice currently on the Court; Richard Stockton, signer of the Declaration of Independence, Associate Justice of the State Supreme Court and namesake of Stockton University; and Paul Vlocker, Chairman of the Federal Reserve under Presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan, Chairman of the Economic Recovery Advisory Board under President Barack Obama. SPORTS Rick Barry, named one of the 50 Greatest Players in History by the NBA; Carol Blazejowski, Former President and General Manager of the WNBA New York Liberty; Dick Button, Olympic and five-time World Champion figure skater; Mary Decker, Olympic and World Championship track athlete; Rosey Grier, two-time NFL Pro Bowler; Orel Hershiser, three-time MLB All-Star, played primarily with the Los Angeles Dodgers; Carli Lloyd, professional soccer midfielder, two-time Olympic gold medalist and FIFA Women’s World Cup winner; Willis Reed, played for the New York Knicks for his entire NBA career, voted one of the 50 Greatest Players in History; Phil Simms, New York Giants star quarterback and MVP of Super Bowl XXI; and Chuck Wepner, the “Bayonne Brawler,” claimed he was the inspiration for the movie Rocky.


News Article | July 14, 2016
Site: www.techtimes.com

Beachgoers in New Jersey were surprised to see that the typically grayish waters along the shore suddenly turned aquamarine. Photographs captured by NASA's Aqua satellite show that the ocean around South Jersey has taken on a greenish shade as a result of phytoplankton bloom. The microorganisms are visible in waters along the Long Beach Island coast to Cape May. Compared to algae blooms, which are known to produce toxic chemicals, the phytoplankton found in the Jersey shore is not considered an annual occurrence and doesn't pose any threat to the local marine life. Phytoplankton, also known as microalgae, are microscopic organisms that live in the upper layer of bodies of water often exposed to sunlight. Their placement allows them to collect energy from the sun and combine it with chlorophyll and other nutrients to feed themselves similar to terrestrial plants. According to Prof. Elizabeth Lacey, a marine scientist from Stockton University, it is the chlorophyll in the phytoplankton's bodies that allows them to give off a greenish appearance in the water. To produce such a phenomenon, the microorganisms typically have to use up all available nutrients found in polluted inland waters. However, it was a recent upwelling that helped turn the ocean in New Jersey aquamarine. An upwelling occurs when gusts of wind blow away surface waters from the shoreline, allowing cooler and nutrient-filled waters from below to rise and replace them. Marine scientist Oscar Schofield from Rutgers University said upwellings often occur during summertime, making it possible for phytoplankton to bloom at a larger scale. He said that these upwelling events can occur several times every summer and cause massive phytoplankton blooms to discolor bodies of water. The presence of phytoplankton blooms can help explain why New Jersey's waters suddenly turned aquamarine, but it doesn't reveal why the shoreline became unusually clear as well. This may have something to do more with an environmental event that is happening a little bit more inland. The Northeast has been suffering from abnormally dry conditions for the past few months. Scientists think that the significant reduction of freshwater runoffs making their way to the ocean is causing Jersey shore waters to become clearer than normal. While waters around New Jersey may appear tropical at the moment, experts warn that it doesn't necessarily mean that they would feel like those found in the Caribbean. The recent upwelling of the waters caused ocean temperatures to drop to about 60 degrees last week. Scientists noted that waters in New Jersey's bays and farther offshore also became warmer than normal. Temperatures have since warmed in waters near the shore, reaching somewhere between 70 and 75 degrees. So far, it is still uncertain how long the ocean around South Jersey will stay green. Experts believe a sudden shift in wind could move the phytoplankton population and cause the waters to change color again. However, as long as conditions remain the same in the coming days, the microorganisms will continue to make the ocean look green. © 2016 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 597.99K | Year: 2011

The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey provides twenty-five S-STEM scholarships each year for talented yet financially disadvantaged students pursuing baccalaureate degrees in computer science and information systems, engineering, computational science or mathematics. The program increases both undergraduate retention and placements in graduate schools or STEM careers. Special outreach activities include awareness campaigns, faculty involvement with high schools/county colleges and a computer fair. Special mentoring is provided to attract and retain female CSIS majors. Academic support is provided by especially designed courses such as Bridges Connecting Computer Science and Calculus which has resulted in a 20% improvement in performance in calculus. The Women in Computing course targets first year students to increase and retain female majors. Among the women who intend to major in CSIS, 100% of those in this course are still CSIS majors at the end of the second year and beyond. Tutoring in programming, mentoring and internship and research experiences are also offered.

This program builds on a previous successful NSF project which resulted in a 96% retention rate and a 10% increase in GPAs among participating students. Every graduate found a major-related job or acceptance into graduate school. Seventy-three percent of Stockton students qualify for financial need and 26% are first-generation college students. This scholarship program enables students to work less and focus on academics.


News Article | March 2, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

This July 1, 2016, photo shows striking union members on the picket line shortly after a strike began against the Trump Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic City, N.J. On Wednesday, March 1, 2017, owner Carl Icahn reached a deal to sell the casino, which shut down on Oct. 10, 2016, to Hard Rock International and two New Jersey investors. The sale price was not divulged. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry) ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Billionaire investor Carl Icahn reached a deal Wednesday to sell the shuttered Trump Taj Mahal casino in Atlantic City to Hard Rock International and two New Jersey investors. The sale comes four months after Icahn closed it amid a crippling strike. "We are excited to be part of this revitalization of Atlantic City creating thousands of jobs to help local employment," Jim Allen, chairman of Hard Rock International, said in a statement. "We are 100 percent convinced Hard Rock Hotel and Casino Atlantic City will be a success." He said the company plans to invest $300 million in renovating and rebranding the property. Icahn, who also owns Atlantic City's Tropicana Casino and Resort, said he decided one casino in town is enough. He said in January he had lost about $300 million owning the Taj Mahal, and would be delighted if he could sell it for half that amount. "We ... are extremely happy with our ownership of the Tropicana Casino and Resort, and after considerable analysis and deliberation we determined that we only wanted to own one operating casino property in Atlantic City," he said in a statement Wednesday night. "A sale of the Taj Mahal therefore represents the optimal outcome for us. We wish Hard Rock and its partners the best of luck with the Taj Mahal." Hard Rock has proposed building a major casino resort in northern New Jersey at the Meadowlands racetrack with its owner Jeff Gural. But voters overwhelmingly rejected a statewide referendum last November that would have authorized casino gambling to expand beyond Atlantic City, and the issue cannot be revisited for at least two years. It was not immediately clear whether Hard Rock still intends to seek a Meadowlands casino. The two investors are Joseph Jingoli, who is working on a new campus for Stockton University in Atlantic City, and Jack Morris, CEO of Edgewood Properties. "This project is led by a proven leader in gaming, brings hundreds of million dollars in new investment, creates hundreds of construction positions, countless positions within the Hard Rock Casino Hotel and will bring thousands and thousands of new visitors to this great city," Jingoli said. "This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be a part of revitalizing one of our nation's most iconic destinations," Morris added. Hard Rock has long toyed with the idea of opening a casino resort in Atlantic City. In 2011, the company proposed — and soon abandoned — a music-themed casino resort at the southern end of the Boardwalk. Icahn said the sale does not include the shuttered Trump Plaza Hotel and Casino, which closed in 2014. Icahn said he is still trying to sell that property. President Trump, who at the time was a Manhattan real estate mogul, dubbed the Taj Mahal "the eighth wonder of the world" when it opened in 1990. But within a year it was in bankruptcy, the victim of unsustainably high levels of debt taken on during its construction. Trump cut most of his ties with Atlantic City in 2009, stepping down from the company he once ran, Trump Entertainment Resorts, most of which was then controlled by bondholders who swapped their debt for equity in the company during bankruptcy. Trump retained only a 10 percent stake in the company in return for the right to use his name, but that was wiped out last year when Icahn acquired the company from its latest Chapter 11 filing. Local 54 of the Unite-HERE union went on strike against the Taj Mahal on July 1 when it could not reach a new contract with Icahn to restore benefits that Trump Entertainment got a bankruptcy court judge to terminate in October 2014. Losing millions of dollars a month, Icahn decided to close the casino on Oct. 10, putting nearly 3,000 workers out of jobs. Many of those workers are expected to be rehired when the casino opens, which might not happen until the summer of 2018.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: news.europawire.eu

NEW YORK, NY, 02-Nov-2016 — /EuropaWire/ — Holly Kingsley has been named Chief Operations Officer (COO) at Pace, a WPP company based in New York City, with offices in New Jersey and Florida. Pace is a full-service branding and marketing agency with a venerable track record of over six decades of innovation in developing successful campaigns for residential and commercial real estate clients. Kingsley joined Pace in 1997 as an account executive. Over the years, she has developed expertise in marketing for residential communities and the new-home market. At Pace, Kingsley has risen through the ranks to the role of Senior Vice President and now, COO. In her new position, Kingsley will oversee key agency operations and logistics, while continuing her responsibilities for supervising strategic planning and providing senior-level management for many of the agency’s key clients. According to Mary Ellen Howe, COO, Specialist Communications, North America for WPP Group, “Holly has been prepared for this role for years, so it’s a very natural transition for her to step into the position now. I can’t think of anyone who knows the ins and outs of Pace better than Holly. She has worked at Pace for nearly two decades in so many vital roles, growing and advancing in her responsibilities and capabilities and she represents some of the agency’s most critical clients.” “One of the things I love about Holly is her reputation as a true problem solver,” said Cara Faske, President and CEO of Pace. “She has a hands-on approach and a ‘can-do’ attitude, which is perfect for this role as COO. I’m so proud to work alongside her and excited for what she will bring to this new position, as part of our strategic leadership team.” Kingsley is a graduate of Stockton University and also attended the University of Tennessee, with a background in communications and public relations. “I’m honored to be trusted in this new position at Pace and excited to work with Cara to lead our team at this new juncture in the agency’s history,” Kingsley commented. “I’m looking forward to streamlining many of our internal procedures to enhance our efficiency and our creativity. I’m also particularly excited about spearheading our efforts to expand our service to clients in central and southern New Jersey and the Philadelphia-Delaware Valley markets. We have such a storied history in the industry and have established a consistent and powerful presence in the market for nearly seventy years. At the same time, it’s been great evolving our brand over the past couple of years to meet the challenges of a changing world and re-introducing Pace to a new generation of clients.” Founded in 1949, Pace was acquired in 1986 by WPP, the world’s largest communications services group with billings of US$73 billion and revenues of US$19 billion. WPP is parent to some of the most prominent and successful firms in the field, including J. Walter Thompson, Ogilvy and Mather, Grey and Hill and Knowlton. In addition to specializing in residential and commercial real estate, the agency has also served a variety of other sectors including hospitals and healthcare, hospitality, education, and non-profit organizations. Pace is parent company to Green Integrated Marketing Services in Boca Raton, Florida; and Stalder/Green in Orlando, Florida. PACE’s 3D arm is Agency Red. For more information, visit paceadv.com.


News Article | October 26, 2016
Site: www.newscientist.com

Methane is gushing forth from hundreds of newly-discovered deep-sea vents all along the US’s western seaboard. “It appears that the entire coast off Washington, Oregon and California is a giant methane seep,” says Robert Ballard, founder and director of the Ocean Exploration Trust in Connecticut. In all, 500 new seeps were discovered by submersibles operated from the trust’s ship, Nautilus (see video below). The discovery will be presented this week in New York at the National Ocean Exploration Forum. However, there’s still work to be done to pin down the exact composition of the bubbles coming from the seeps. “Members of our group are analysing the samples taken in June for a wide range of gases,” says Robert Embley, chief scientist on the Nautilus. Embley says that previous samples from similar sites were mostly methane, but methane hydrate – made from water and methane – can form too. Methane has the potential to accelerate global warming because it traps heat 40 times as effectively as carbon dioxide. Knowing how much is gushing out of the seeps and what amount makes it into the atmosphere should enable estimates of their impact on global warming in the future. “The first step to finding out is getting a baseline of what’s coming out of the seafloor at present,” says Embley. The team thinks it is likely that they will find yet more seeps on the seafloor off the eastern US. “We hope there will be opportunities for more mapping in the next couple of field seasons to get a more complete baseline of sites,” says Embley. Also being showcased at the National Ocean Exploration Forum this week is the amazing variety of rare and unusual sea creatures. They were filmed this year in the Mariana Trench by submersibles operated from the Okeanos, a deep-sea exploration ship managed by the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Those caught on camera include glowing orb-like creatures (see video below), spectacular Dracula squids,  sea cucumbers that resemble Mary Poppins carrying an umbrella, and a distinctive purple relative of the cuttlefish, so cute it has been dubbed the cuddle fish. Curiously, many are purple, but no one knows why. “There may not really be many deep-sea animals that are purple, they just seem to be the ones that get our attention,” says Tara Luke of Stockton University in New Jersey. Read more: New Arctic life on barren seabed thrives on methane jets

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