Stem Cells

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Stem Cells

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Kennedy Space Center, FL, May 26, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The SpaceX Falcon 9 vehicle is slated to launch its 11thcargo resupply mission (CRS-11) to the International Space Station (ISS) no earlier than June 1, 2017 from Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex  39A. Onboard the Falcon 9 launch vehicle is the SpaceX Dragon spacecraft, which will carry more than 40 ISS U.S. National Laboratory sponsored experiments. This mission will showcase the breadth of research possible through the ISS National Laboratory, as experiments range from the life and physical sciences, Earth observation and remote sensing, and a variety of student-led investigations. Below highlights the investigations as part of the SpaceX CRS-11 mission: Colloids are suspensions of microscopic particles in a liquid, and they are found in products ranging from milk to fabric softener. Consumer products often use colloidal gels to distribute specialized ingredients, for instance droplets that soften fabrics, but the gels must serve two opposite purposes: they have to disperse the active ingredient so it can work, yet maintain an even distribution so the product does not spoil. Advanced Colloids Experiment-Temperature-6 (ACE-T-6) studies the microscopic behavior of colloids in gels and creams, providing new insight into fundamental interactions that can improve product shelf life. Vermicomposting, or using worms to break down food scraps, is an effective way to reduce waste and obtain a nutrient-rich fertilizer for plants. The NanoRacks-NDC-Bell Middle School-Efficiency of Vermicomposting in a Closed System (NanoRacks-NDC-BMS-Vermicomposting) investigation is a student-designed project that studies whether red wiggler worms, a species of earthworm, are able to produce compost in space. Results are used to study the potential for composting as a form of recycling on future long-duration space missions. Functional Effects of Spaceflight on Cardiovascular Stem Cells (Cardiac Stem Cells) investigates how microgravity alters stem cells and the factors that govern stem cell activity, including physical and molecular changes. Spaceflight is known to affect cardiac function and structure, but the biological basis for this is not clearly understood. This investigation helps clarify the role of stem cells in cardiac biology and tissue regeneration. In addition, this research could confirm the hypothesis that microgravity accelerates the aging process. Teledyne Brown Engineering developed the Multiple User System for Earth Sensing (MUSES), an Earth imaging platform, as part of the company’s new commercial space-based digital imaging business. MUSES hosts earth-viewing instruments (Hosted Payloads), such as high resolution digital cameras, hyperspectral imagers, and provides precision pointing and other accommodations. It hosts up to four instruments at the same time, and offers the ability to change, upgrade, and robotically service those instruments. It also provides a test bed for technology demonstration and technology maturation by providing long-term access to the space environment on the ISS. Spaceflight affects organisms in a wide range of ways, from a reduction in human bone density to changes in plant root growth. NanoRacks-JAMSS-2 Lagrange-1 helps students understand potential spaceflight-related changes by exposing plant seeds to microgravity, and then germinating and growing them on Earth. The plants are compared with specimens grown from seeds that remained on the ground. The investigation also connects students to the space program by sending their photographic likenesses and personal messages into orbit. This connection inspires the next generation of scientists and engineers who will work on international space programs. NEUTRON CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC STUDIES OF HUMAN ACETYLCHOLINESTERASE FOR THE DESIGN OF ACCERERATED REACTIVATORS (ORNL-PCG) The investigative team is trying to improve our understanding of acetylcholinesterase, an enzyme essential for normal communication between nerve cells and between nerve and muscle cells. As a target of deadly neurotoxins produced by animals as venom or by man as nerve agents and pesticides, understanding the structure of acetylcholinesterase is critical to designing better antidotes to poisoning by chemicals that attack the nervous system. The Oak Ridge National Lab team plans to use the microgravity environment of space to grow large crystals of the enzyme that will be imaged back on Earth using a powerful imaging approach called neutron diffraction. Neutron diffraction yields very detailed structural information but requires much larger crystals than traditional x-ray diffraction imaging methods. The investigators hypothesize that structural images of space-grown crystals will bring us closer to more effective and less toxic antidotes for neurotoxins that bind and inhibit acetylcholinesterase. The Student Spaceflight Experiments Program (SSEP) provides one of the most exciting educational opportunities available: student-designed experiments to be flown on the International Space Station. The NanoRacks-National Center for Earth and Space Science Education-Odyssey (NanoRacks-NCESSE-Odyssey) investigation contains 24 student experiments, including microgravity studies of plant, algae and bacterial growth; polymers; development of multi-cellular organisms; chemical and physical processes; antibiotic efficacy; and allergic reactions. The program immerses students and teachers in real science, providing first-hand experience conducting scientific experiments and connecting them to the space program. Astronauts living in space for extended durations experience bone density loss, or osteoporosis. Currently, countermeasures include daily exercise designed to prevent bone loss from rapid bone density loss deterioration. However, in space and on Earth, therapies for osteoporosis cannot restore bone that is already lost. The Systemic Therapy of NELL-1 for Osteoporosis (Rodent Research-5) investigation tests a new drug on rodents that can both rebuild bone and block further bone loss, improving health for crew members in orbit and people on Earth. Dr. Soo’s laboratory has been funded by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases within the National Institutes of Health. This experiment builds on those previous research investigations. THE EFFECT OF MICROGRAVITY ON TWO STRAINS OF BIOFUEL PRODUCING ALGAE WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF RENEWABLE FUELS IN SPACE-BASED APPLICATIONS Algae can produce both fats and hydrogen, which can each be used as fuel sources on Earth and potentially in space. NanoRacks-National Design Challenge-Chatfield High School-The Effect of Microgravity on Two Strains of Biofuel Producing Algae with Implications for the Production of Renewable Fuels in Space Based Applications (NanoRacks-NDC-CHS-The Green Machine) studies two algae species to determine whether they still produce hydrogen and store fats while growing in microgravity. Results from this student-designed investigation improve efforts to produce a sustainable biofuel in space, as well as remove carbon dioxide from crew quarters. Tomatosphere is a hands-on student research experience with a standards-based curriculum guide that provides students the opportunity to investigate, create, test, and evaluate a solution for a real world case study. Tomatosphere provides information about how spaceflight affects seed and plant growth and which type of seed is likely to be most suitable for long duration spaceflight. It also exposes students to space research, inspiring the next generation of space explorers. It is particularly valuable in urban school settings where students have little connection to agriculture. In its 15-year existence, the program has reached approximately 3.3 million students. Valley Christian High School (San Jose, CA), in partnership with other high schools throughout the world Students at Valley Christian High School (VCHS) have a rich history of sending investigations to the ISS through its launch partner, NanoRacks. On SpaceX CRS-11, students from VCHS have partnered with other students from across the world to send 12 total experiments to the ISS National Laboratory. Investigations will range from investigating high quality food nutrients, to the fermentation of microbes, to even an investigation monitoring the growth of a special bacterial strain. The program VCHS has developed with NanoRacks allows students the opportunity to not only conceive a flight project, but learn, understand, and implement the engineering required for a successful experiment in microgravity. Thus far in 2017, the ISS National Lab has sponsored over 75 separate experiments that have reached the station. This launch manifest adds to an impressive list of experiments from previous missions in 2017 to include; stem cell studies, cell culturing, protein crystal growth, external platform payloads, student experiments, Earth observation and remote sensing. To learn more about those investigations and other station research, visit www.spacestationresearch.com. About CASIS: The Center for Advancement of Science in Space (CASIS) is the non-profit organization selected to manage the ISS National Laboratory with a focus on enabling a new era of space research to improve life on Earth. In this innovative role, CASIS promotes and brokers a diverse range of research in life sciences, physical sciences, remote sensing, technology development, and education. Since 2011, the ISS National Lab portfolio has included hundreds of novel research projects spanning multiple scientific disciplines, all with the intention of benefitting life on Earth.. Working together with NASA, CASIS aims to advance the nation’s leadership in commercial space, pursue groundbreaking science not possible on Earth, and leverage the space station to inspire the next generation. About the ISS National Laboratory: In 2005, Congress designated the U.S. portion of the International Space Station as the nation's newest national laboratory to maximize its use for improving life on Earth, promoting collaboration among diverse users, and advancing STEM education. This unique laboratory environment is available for use by other U.S. government agencies and by academic and private institutions, providing access to the permanent microgravity setting, vantage point in low Earth orbit, and varied environments of space. A photo accompanying this announcement is available at http://www.globenewswire.com/NewsRoom/AttachmentNg/565f968b-ad65-42c2-be54-97423c9dbcba


News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.accesswire.com

EATONTOWN, NJ / ACCESSWIRE / May 23, 2017 / American CryoStem Corporation (OTC PINK: CRYO) a leading strategic developer, marketer and global licensor of patented adipose tissue-based cellular technologies for the Regenerative and Personalized Medicine industries, today released summary corporate and financial highlight information regarding the Company's six months ending March 31, 2017 versus the same six month period in fiscal 2016: "American CryoStem's six months results for the period ended March 31, 2017 reflect the expansion of distribution of our products and services. During the balance of our Fiscal 2017, we will be seeking 510k registration of our products so that they are more readily accepted for use in the international markets," stated Anthony Dudzinski, COO. John S. Arnone, CEO stated, "We have seen a steady increase of new patients utilizing our ATGRAFT tissue storage platform and individuals storing their stem cells for future use during the quarter. We are in discussions for new global territories with licensees seeking to establish our adipose tissue (fat) based collect-process-store, stem cell platform in their country. The increased interest in cellular therapies is evidenced in eight thousand (8,000+) plus clinical trials currently registered with ClinicalTrials.gov focused on adipose tissue and its derivatives, and a continued expansion of approved cellular therapies outside the US market." Arnone further stated, "We look forward to expanding our global laboratory consumable product sales as we open new territories and regenerative and personalized medicine applications become main stream." American CryoStem Corporation (OTC PINK: CRYO); was founded in 2008, and has evolved to become a biotechnology pioneer, standardizing adipose tissue derived technologies (Adult Stem Cells) for the fields of Regenerative and Personalized Medicine. The Company operates a state-of-art, FDA-registered, clinical laboratory in New Jersey and licensed laboratories in Hong Kong, China and Tokyo, Japan, operating on our proprietary platform, dedicated to the collection, processing, bio-banking, culturing and differentiation of adipose tissue (fat) and adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) for current or future use in regenerative medicine. CRYO maintains a strategic portfolio of intellectual property (IP) that surrounds our proprietary technology which supports a growing pipeline of stem cell applications and biologic products. We are leveraging our proprietary, IRB approved, FDA compliant platform and a developed product portfolio to create a domestic and global footprint of licensed laboratory affiliates, physicians networks and research organizations who purchase tissue collection, processing and storage consumables from our Company. Our laboratory stem cell bank/line products are characterized adult human Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC's) derived from adipose tissue that work in conjunction with our 13 patented (non-animal) medium lines. The Company's R&D efforts are focused on university and private collaborations to discover, develop and commercialize ADSC therapies by utilizing our standardized collection-processing-storage methodology and laboratory products combined with synergistic technologies to create jointly developed regenerative medicine applications and intellectual property. For further detailed corporate or Regenerative Medicine information please visit: www.americancryostem.com, request by email at [email protected] or phone 732-747-1007


The analysis suggests that by 2027, bioprinting applications will generate over $1 billion in revenue, accompanied by a healthy market in specialist bioprinting hardware and materials. The report believes that the potential for the bioprinting sector has increased considerably in the past couple of years.  What we are seeing is that (1) bioprinters themselves have technologically matured and (2) they have also become more accessible in terms of cost to a wider target of users -- low-cost desktop bioprinters are available at below $20,000. Meanwhile, bioprinting is experiencing a rapid transformation from basic research in academic laboratories to an emerging industry due to its near-term potential in areas such as drug discovery, personalized medicine, regenerative medicine, cosmetics testing, medical devices and food manufacturing. While printing complete organs still seems a long way off, revenues from bioprinting are already being generated from these more immediate applications. This report explores the commercial implications of bioprinting in depth and includes: - Ten-year forecasts of bioprinting materials, hardware and applications markets. Materials are broken out by type and forecasted hardware is presented by both unit sales and in revenue terms, with breakouts by process technology and price point.  Revenues for bioprinting applications are segmented by the type of application - specifically, drug discovery, cosmetics testing, medical devices and tissue regeneration. - Highly granular information about current pricing of both bioprinters and printing materials for bioprinting applications.  In addition, the report provides detailed information on which companies and institutions are using bioprinters today and which printers they are using. - An assessment of the product/market strategies of emerging and established firms in the bioprinting space.  While many of the firms pioneering this space are well-funded and innovative start-ups, bioprinting is also attracting the attention of some of the largest multinationals in big pharma and cosmetics, for example.  Astellas Pharma, Bristol-Meyers Squibb, Merck, Novartis, Procter and Gamble, Roche and others all have bioprinting programs, as do some of the large research facilities in the world, such as the National Institutes of Health in the US.  Meanwhile, bioprinting continues to be a favorite target of venture capital firms. - A full discussion of the latest developments in droplet and extrusion bio printer and what they mean both technically and from a business perspective.  Also included is an analysis of the very diverse market for bioprinted materials.  Emerging bioinks, include combinations of polymers, ceramics, cells, cell aggregates, peptides, growth factors, hydrogels, scaffold components, and other materials. Key Topics Covered: Chapter One: The 3D Bioprinting Market in 2016 1.1 Key Trends in 3D Bioprinting Driving Hardware Demand 1.1.1 Analysis of Commercially Viable 3D Bioprinting Applications 1.1.2 The Promise of 3D-Printed Organs 1.1.3 How 3D Cell Culture is Affecting Medical Research 1.2 The 3D Bioprinting Industry 1.2.1 The Market for Bioprinting Materials 1.2.2 How Low Cost and Open Source Bioprinting is Affecting the Competitive Landscape 1.3 Objective of this Report 1.4 Methodology of this Report Chapter Two: 3D Bioprinting Processes, Hardware and Materials 2.1 Origins of Bioprinting 2.1.1 Scaffold Based (Indirect) Bioprinting 2.1.2 Scaffold-free Bioprinting 2.2 Laser-Assisted Bioprinting (LaBP) Methods 2.2.1 LIFT (Laser-Induced Forward Transfer) 2.2.2 LGDW (Laser Guided Direct Writing) 2.3 Stereolithography 2.3.1 Microstereolithography (MSTL) 2.3.2 Projection-based Microstereolithography (pMSTL) 2.3.3 Nanostereolithography (NSTL) 2.3.4 Two-Photon Polymerization (2PP) 2.4 Laser Free Bioprinting Methods (LfBP) 2.4.1 3D Bioprinting by Material Jetting 2.4.1.1 Inkjet 2.4.1.2 Drop-on-Demand (DoD) 2.4.1.3 Thermal DoD 2.4.1.4 Piezoelectric 2.4.1.5 ElectroHydroDynamic (EHD) 2.4.1.6 Acoustic Bioprinting 2.4.1.7 Micro-Valve Bioprinting 2.4.2 3D Bioprinting by Extrusion 2.4.2.1 Pneumatic, Piston and Screw Based Extrusion 2.4.2.2 MHDS (Multi-Head Deposition System) 2.4.2.3 How Low-Cost Open Source Bioprinting is Affecting Academic Research 2.5 Other Methods 2.5.1 Electrospinning 2.5.2 Magnetic Levitation (n3D) 2.5.3 The Kenzan Method 2.6 Post Processing: The Bioreactor 2.7 Materials for 3D Bioprinting 2.7.1 Characteristics of Bioinks and Bio-consumables 2.7.2 Scaffolds 2.7.3 Hydrogels 2.7.3.1 Alginate 2.7.3.2 Collagen 2.7.3.3 Gelatin 2.7.3.4 GelMA 2.7.3.5 Fibrin 2.7.3.6 Hyaluronic Acid 2.7.3.7 dECM 2.7.4 Stem Cells 2.7.5 Spheroids and Organoids 2.7.6 Polymers 2.7.6.1 PCL 2.7.6.2 PLGA 2.7.6.3 PEG 2.7.6.4 Poloxamer 407 (Pluronic F127) 2.7.6.5 PLA 2.7.7 Ceramics Chapter Three: The Present and Future of 3D Bioprinting Applications 3.1 Tissue Regeneration 3.1.1 Cartilage 3.1.2 Skin 3.1.3 Bones 3.1.4 Blood Vessels 3.2 Complex Organs: the Billion Cell Construct 3.2.1 Thyroid and Pancreas 3.2.2 Kidney 3.2.3 Liver 3.2.4 Heart and Valves 3.2.5 Brain 3.3 Research 3.3.1 Drug Toxicity Testing and Screening 3.3.2 In-Vitro Organ Models and the Organ-on-a-Chip 3.3.3 Cosmetics 3.4 Cellular Agriculture 3.4.1 Meat 3.4.2 Other Products Chapter Four: Analysis of the 3D Bioprinting Competitive Landscape 4.1 Leading Hardware Manufacturers 4.1.1 EnvisionTEC 4.1.2 RegenHU 4.1.3 Advanced Solutions (BioAssemblyBot) 4.1.4 3D Bioprinting Solutions 4.1.5 Regenovo 4.1.6 GeSIM 4.1.7 Cyfuse Biomedical 4.2 Low-Cost Hardware and Commercial Bioink Manufacturers 4.2.1 Biobots (U.S.) 4.2.2 CELLINK (Europe - Sweden) 4.2.3 Rokit (Asia - South Korea) 4.2.4 Bio3D (Asia - Singapore) 4.2.5 Bioink Solutions 4.3 Major Universities and Associations in 3D Bioprinting Research 4.3.1 Harvard: Wyss Institute Lewis Lab 4.3.2 International Society for BioFabrication 4.3.3 Utrecht University Biofabrication Facility 4.3.4 IMS Postech South Korea 4.3.5 Northwestern University - Shah TEAM Lab 4.3.6 Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFRIM) 4.3.7 Herston Biofabrication Institute 4.4 Commercial Bioprinting Research Firms 4.4.1 Organovo 4.4.2 Tissue Regeneration Systems 4.4.3 Poietis 4.4.4 Aspect Biosystems 4.4.5 Nano3D Biosciences (n3D) Chapter Five: Ten-Year 3D Bioprinting Market Forecasts - Hardware, Materials and Research 5.1 Limiting Factors 5.2 The 3D Bioprinting Market: Hardware, Materials and Applications: Ten-Year Forecast 5.2.1 Ten-Year Forecast of 3D Bioprinting Hardware Market 5.3 Ten-Year Bioink Forecast 5.3.1 Hydrogels and Scaffolding Materials Sales and Demand 5.3.2 Scaffolding Materials Sales and Demand 5.3.3 Matrix Materials Sales and Demand 5.4 Ten-Year Forecast for 3D Bioprinting Research and Tissue Regeneration Applications For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/pvsvq3/bioprinting Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716 To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-3d-printing-report-that-projects-bioprinting-revenues-to-reach-11-billion-in-revenues-in-2027---research-and-markets-300464120.html


Browse tables and figures, 04 company profiles spread across 100 pages at http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/990233-global-stem-cells-market-research-report-2017.html . Global Stem Cells Market Report 2017 is a professional and in-depth survey on the current state of the Stem Cells industry. The report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Stem Cells market analysis is provided for the international market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions' development status. Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Region, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Stem Cells in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), like North America, China, Europe, Japan, India, Southeast Asia split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Stem Cells in each application. This report studies Stem Cells in global market, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering CCBC, Vcanbio, Boyalife and Beikebiotech. Place a direct purchase order of this report at http://www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=990233 . Cord Blood Stem Cells Industry 2017 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Cord Blood Stem Cells industry. Cord Blood Stem Cells report studies Cord Blood Stem Cells in Global market, especially in North America, China, Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2012 to 2016, and forecast to 2022. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, and revenue and market share for each manufacturer. With the tables and figures the report provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals. The Global Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) Industry 2017 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) industry. Firstly, the report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) market analysis is provided for the Global market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions' development status. Secondly, development policies and plans are discussed as well as manufacturing processes and cost structures. This report also states import/export, supply and consumption figures as well as cost, price, revenue and gross margin. This report studies Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) in Global market, focuses on price, sales, revenue of each type in Global. This report also focuses on the sales (consumption), production, import and export of Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) in global market, forecast to 2021, from 2016. Firstly, this report focuses on price, sales, revenue and growth rate of each type, as well as the types and each type price of key manufacturers, through interviewing key manufacturers. Second on basis of segments by manufacturers, this report focuses on the sales, price of each type, average price of Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs), and revenue and market share, for key manufacturers. The Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) industry development trends and marketing channels are also analyzed and the feasibility of new investment projects are assessed and overall research conclusions offered. ReportsnReports.com is your single source for all market research needs. Our database includes 500,000+ market research reports from over 95 leading global publishers & in-depth market research studies of over 5000 micro markets. With comprehensive information about the publishers and the industries for which they publish market research reports, we help you in your purchase decision by mapping your information needs with our huge collection of reports. We provide 24/7 online and offline support to our customers. Connect With Us On:


Browse tables and figures, 04 company profiles spread across 100 pages at http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/990233-global-stem-cells-market-research-report-2017.html . Global Stem Cells Market Report 2017 is a professional and in-depth survey on the current state of the Stem Cells industry. The report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Stem Cells market analysis is provided for the international market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions' development status. Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Region, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Stem Cells in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), like North America, China, Europe, Japan, India, Southeast Asia split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Stem Cells in each application. This report studies Stem Cells in global market, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering CCBC, Vcanbio, Boyalife and Beikebiotech. Place a direct purchase order of this report at http://www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=990233 . Cord Blood Stem Cells Industry 2017 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Cord Blood Stem Cells industry. Cord Blood Stem Cells report studies Cord Blood Stem Cells in Global market, especially in North America, China, Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2012 to 2016, and forecast to 2022. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, and revenue and market share for each manufacturer. With the tables and figures the report provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals. The Global Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) Industry 2017 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) industry. Firstly, the report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) market analysis is provided for the Global market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions' development status. Secondly, development policies and plans are discussed as well as manufacturing processes and cost structures. This report also states import/export, supply and consumption figures as well as cost, price, revenue and gross margin. This report studies Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) in Global market, focuses on price, sales, revenue of each type in Global. This report also focuses on the sales (consumption), production, import and export of Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) in global market, forecast to 2021, from 2016. Firstly, this report focuses on price, sales, revenue and growth rate of each type, as well as the types and each type price of key manufacturers, through interviewing key manufacturers. Second on basis of segments by manufacturers, this report focuses on the sales, price of each type, average price of Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs), and revenue and market share, for key manufacturers. The Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) industry development trends and marketing channels are also analyzed and the feasibility of new investment projects are assessed and overall research conclusions offered. ReportsnReports.com is your single source for all market research needs. Our database includes 500,000+ market research reports from over 95 leading global publishers & in-depth market research studies of over 5000 micro markets. With comprehensive information about the publishers and the industries for which they publish market research reports, we help you in your purchase decision by mapping your information needs with our huge collection of reports. We provide 24/7 online and offline support to our customers. Connect With Us On:


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

It is the "shock absorber" between the vertebrae of the spine, cushioning every step, bend and jump: the intervertebral disc. If the fibrocartilage tissue in the spine degenerates over time, an intervertebral disc can "slip" - pinching the medulla or nerves. The consequences include intense pain or even paralysis. Not only people, but also dogs are often susceptible to this disease. Since intervertebral discs themselves cannot regenerate, the affected disc material is removed in an operation that can be performed on both people and animals. The pressure on the nerves and medulla disappears, but the degeneration of the disc remains. Great hope has thus been placed on stem cell therapy as practiced by Frank Steffen, neurologist at the Clinic for Small Animal Surgery at the Vetsuisse Faculty of the University of Zurich. Stem cells are multipotent cells that can be differentiated into various cell types. Steffen hopes that the stem cells will possibly form new disc cartilage once injected into a damaged disc. His study on three sick German shepherds demonstrate that a treatment with the body's own stem cells are well tolerated - an important first step. Research on intervertebral disc regeneration is frequently performed using animal testing. At the Clinic for Small Animal Surgery in Zurich, researchers have taken another path: "Since we treat numerous dogs who spontaneously sustain a slipped disc every year, we have been able to gain important knowledge directly from animals that are actually afflicted with this disease," Frank Steffen explains. "Due to the similarity in pathology and the course of the illness, conclusions can presumably be drawn for the treatment of affected persons as well." The project for the development of stem cell therapy in dogs is being conducted in cooperation with Swiss Paraplegic Research (SPR) in Nottwil, Switzerland. The study on the sick German shepherds was organized as follows: With the permission of the dog owners, neurologist Frank Steffen and his team removed stem cells from the marrow of the pelvic bone of the affected animals. After the cleaning and preparation of the cell material in the laboratory, the stem cells were injected into the degenerated intervertebral disc during a disc operation that had become necessary for the animal in question. "Our objective is for the stem cells to trigger cellular and molecular repair processes and, ideally, to form new intervertebral disc cells in order to contribute to the regeneration of the tissue," Steffen says. The results are pleasing: The three dogs well tolerated the injections of their own stem cells and the researchers have determined no negative effects. However, later X-rays and magnetic resonance tomographies did not show clear indications that the damaged discs have already regenerated in comparison with the control group. Not yet - of that, Steffen is confident. "Proving the tolerability of the therapy was our first important step." Now he is working on the effectiveness of the stem cell injections, for example, with the targeted addition of growth factors. "If our method proves successful one day, it would be a pioneering step - for human medicine as well," the neurologist says. Frank Steffen, Lucas Smolders, Anne Roentgen, Alessandro Bertolo, and Jivko Stoyanov. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Autologous Therapy in Dogs with Naturally Occurring Intervertebral Disc Disease: Feasibility, Safety and Preliminary Results. Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods. 4 May 2017, ahead of print. doi:10.1089/ten.TEC.2017.0033


New Rochelle, NY, May 11, 2017--Researchers have shown that a novel cage constraint can prevent engineered cartilage from swelling during growth in culture, leading to better collagen stability and enhanced functional properties of the cartilage. The innovative cage system, designed to limit growth of engineered tissues within a fixed volume and shape while providing sufficient nutrients, is described in an article in Tissue Engineering, Part A, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is part of a special issue on Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering and is available free on the Tissue Engineering website until June 11, 2017. Robert Nims, Gerard Ateshian, PhD, and coauthors from Columbia University, New York, NY, created the cage constraint system for growing engineered cartilage in culture to overcome the common problem of osmotic swelling pressure, which destabilizes immature collagen, inhibiting the development of a strong collagen framework needed to support cartilage formation. The researchers studied the growth of engineered cartilage constructs in two different types of scaffolds -- agarose and cartilage-derived matrix hydrogel -- and compared it to unconstrained growth. In the article entitled "Constrained Cage Culture Improves Engineered Cartilage Functional Properties by Enhancing Collagen Network Stability," the authors report the differences in swelling-induced expansion, functional properties, and collagen content of the cartilage constructs grown in the two types of scaffolds or under unconstrained conditions. "The management of mechanical forces in the development of engineered tissues is emerging as an important aspect of control. In this study, three-dimensional constraint is shown to make an important contribution to appropriate tissue maturation," says Tissue Engineering Co-Editor-in-Chief Peter C. Johnson, MD, Principal, MedSurgPI, LLC and President and CEO, Scintellix, LLC, Raleigh, NC. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers R01 AR060361, R01 AR046568, R01 DE016525, and P41 EB002520. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Tissue Engineering is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online and in print in three parts: Part A, the flagship journal published 24 times per year; Part B: Reviews, published bimonthly, and Part C: Methods, published 12 times per year. Led by Co-Editors-In-Chief Antonios G. Mikos, PhD, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX, and Peter C. Johnson, MD, Principal, MedSurgPI, LLC and President and CEO, Scintellix, LLC, Raleigh, NC, the Journal brings together scientific and medical experts in the fields of biomedical engineering, material science, molecular and cellular biology, and genetic engineering. Tissue Engineering is the official journal of the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS). Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed online at the Tissue Engineering website. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Stem Cells and Development, Human Gene Therapy, and Advances in Wound Care. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.


Dublin, May 12, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 - Stem Cells, Tissue Engineering, BioBanking & CAR-T Industries" report to their offering. Current regenerative medicine market is worth $18.9 billion globally, and will hit over $53 billion by 2021 According to the report ‘due to the dominance of the bone and joint reconstruction market, the US currently has the biggest space, followed by Europe. However, due to recent positive legislation in Japan and Europe, the stem cell arena will grow more substantially in these regions over the next five years. By 2021, it is possible that Europe will surpass the US market with respect to stem cell applications, and this will become more likely if the Trump Administration restricts legislation and funding’. The regenerative medicine market has massive scope and can be applied to a wide range of diseases and indications including neurological, autoimmune, cardiovascular, diabetes, musculoskeletal, ocular, orthopedic and wound healing. To that end, the expanse of market opportunities is large as are the patient populations globally. Kelly indicates that ‘this study has extensively profiled all major players in the market, analyzed their financials, pipeline products and business strategy going forward. It is the most comprehensive analysis on the market, and stakeholders wanting to gain a significant insight would greatly benefit from this information’. Financial forecasts to 2021 are included with respect to: Interestingly, the report also takes a detailed look at the CAR-T industry and its impact on the healthcare space. The CAR-T industry is addressing unmet needs in specific relapsed cancers, however does early clinical trial data support a blockbuster status for this upcoming therapy? The report also addresses the following key points: Key stakeholder questions are answered in this 680 page analysis including: Key Topics Covered: 1.0 Report Synopsis 1.1 Objectives of Report 1.2 Executive Summary 1.2 Key Questions Answered in this Report 1.3 Data Sources and Methodology 2.0 Introduction 2.1 Gurdon and Yamanaka Share the Nobel Prize 2.2 Stem Cell Clinical Trials: Initiated in 2010 2.3 Types of Stem Cells 2.4 Adult (Tissue) Stem Cells 2.5 Pluripotent Stem Cells 2.6 Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT) 2.7 Induced pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) 2.8 Mesenchymal Cells 2.9 Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells 2.10 Umbilical Cord Stem Cells 2.11 Heart Stem Cells 2.12 Mammary Stem Cells 2.13 Neural Stem Cells 2.14 Stem Cell Applications in Retinal Repair 2.15 Liver Stem Cells 2.16 Gut Stem Cells 2.16 Pancreatic Stem Cells 2.17 Epidermal Stem Cells 3.0 Stem Cells and Clinical Trials 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Pluripotent Stem Cells 3.3 Limbal Stem Cells 3.4 Neural Stem Cells 3.5 Endothelial Stem or Progenitor Cells 3.6 Placental Stem Cells 3.7 Why Do Stem Cell Clinical Trials Fail? 3.8 What is the Future of Stem Cell Trials? 3.9 Cutting Edge Stem Cell Clinical Trials 3.10 Ocata Therapeutics Current Stem Cell Trials 3.11 CHA Biotech Current Stem Cell Trials 3.12 Pfizer Current Stem Cell Trials 3.13 GSK Current Stem Cell Trials 3.14 Bayer Current Stem Cell Trials 3.15 Mesoblast International Current Stem Cell Trials 3.16 Millennium Pharmaceutical Current Stem Cell Trial 3.17 AstraZeneca Current Stem Cell Trials 3.18 Merck Current Stem Cell Trials 3.19 Chimerix Current Stem Cell Trials 3.20 Eisai Current Stem Cell Trials 3.21 SanBio Current Stem Cell Trials 3.22 Celgene Current Stem Cell Trials 3.23 StemCells Current Stem Cell Trials 3.24 Genzyme (Sanofi) Current Stem Cell Trials 3.25 Teva Current Stem Cell Trials 3.26 MedImmune Current Stem Cell Trials 3.27 Janssen Current Stem Cell Trials 3.28 Seattle Genetics Current Stem Cell Trials 3.29 Baxter Healthcare Current Stem Cell Trials 3.30 InCyte Corp Current Stem Cell Trials 4.0 Stem Cells, Disruptive Technology, Drug Discovery & Toxicity Testing 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Case Study: Genentech and Stem Cell Technology 4.3 3D Sphere Culture Systems 4.4 Stem Cells and High Throughput Screening 4.5 Genetic Instability of Stem Cells 4.6 Comprehensive in Vitro Proarrhythmia Assay (CiPA) & Cardiomyocytes 4.8 Coupling Precise Genome Editing (PGE) and iPSCs 4.9 Stem Cells & Toxicity Testing 4.10 Stem Cell Disease Models 4.11 Defining Human Disease Specific Phenotypes 4.12 Advantages of Stem Cell Derived Cells & Tissues for Drug Screening 5.0 Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.1 Pluripotent Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.2 Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.3 Neural Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.4 Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biomarkers 6.0 Manufacturing Stem Cell Products 6.1 Manufacturing Strategies For Stem Cell Products 6.2 BioProcess Economics for Stem Cell Products 6.3 Capital Investment 6.4 Cost of Goods 6.5 Bioprocess Economic Drivers & Strategies 6.6 hPSC Expansion & Differentiation using Planar Technology 6.7 hPSC Expansion using 3D Culture 6.8 Microcarrier Systems 6.9 Aggregate Suspension 6.10 Bioreactor Based Differentiation Strategy 6.11 Integrated hPSC Bioprocess Strategy 6.12 GMP Regulations and Stem Cell Products 7.0 Investment & Funding 7.1 What do Investors Want from Cell & Gene Therapy Companies? 7.2 What Makes a Good Investment? 7.3 What Types of Companies do Not Get Investment? 7.4 Global Funding 7.5 Cell & Gene Therapy Investment Going Forward 7.6 What Cell & Gene Companies are the Most Promising in 2017? 7.7 Insights into Investing in Cell and Gene Therapy Companies 8.0 Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 8.1 Market Overview 8.2 Global Frequency Analysis 8.3 Economics of Regenerative Medicine 8.4 Market Applications & Opportunities for Regenerative Therapies 8.5 Global Financial Landscape 8.6 Regenerative Medicine Clinical Trial Statistics 8.7 Regenerative Medicine Market Forecast to 2021 8.8 Regenerative Medicine Geographic Analysis and Forecast to 2021 8.9 Regenerative Medicine Geographical Location of Companies 8.10 Regenerative Medicine Technology Breakdown of Companies 8.11 Commercially Available Regenerative Medicine Products 8.12 Major Regenerative Medicine Milestones 9.0 Stem Cell Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 9.1 Autologous & Allogenic Cell Market Analysis 9.2 Stem Cell Market by Geography 9.3 Stem Cell Market Forecast by Therapeutic Indication 9.4 Stem Cell Reagent Market Trends 10.0 Tissue Engineering Tissue Engineering Market Analysis and Forecast to 2021 10.1 Geographical Analysis and Forecast to 2021 10.2 Geographical Analysis by Company Share 10.3 Tissue Engineering Clinical Indication Analysis & Forecast to 2021 11.0 Biobanking Market Analysis 11.1 Increasing Number of Cord Blood Banks Globally 11.2 Global Biobanking Company Sector Analysis & Breakdown 11.3 Allogenic Versus Autologous Transplant Frequency 11.4 Biobanking Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 11.5 Major Global Players 12.0 Global Access & Challenges of the Regenerative Medicine Market 12.1 Regenerative Medicine Market in the USA 12.2 Regenerative Medicine in Japan 12.3 Regenerative Medicine in China 12.4 Regenerative Medicine in South Korea 13.0 Cell and CAR T Therapy 13.1 Challenges Relating to Cell therapy and Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells in Immunotherapy 13.2 Regulations Pertaining to Immunotherapy, including Adoptive Cell Therapy (CAR-T and TCR) Immunotherapy Regulation in the USA 13.3 Regulations for Cell Therapy & Immunotherapy in Japan 13.4 European Regulation and Cell Therapy & Immunotherapeutics 13.5 Manufacturing of Immunotherapies 13.6 Supply Chain & Logistics 13.7 Pricing & Cost Analysis 14.0 Company Profiles 14.1 Astellas Institute for Regenerative Medicine (Ocata Therapeutics) 14.2 Athersys 14.3 Baxter International (Baxalta, Shire) 14.4 Caladrius Biosciences (NeoStem) 14.5 Cynata Therapeutics 14.6 Cytori Therapeutics 14.7 MEDIPOST 14.8 Mesoblast 14.9 NuVasive 14.10 Osiris Therapeutics 14.11 Plasticell 14.12 Pluristem Therapeutics 14.13 Pfizer 14.14 StemCells Inc 14.15 STEMCELL Technologies 14.16 Takara Bio 14.17 Tigenix 15.0 SWOT Industry Analysis For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/ml94n2/global


Dublin, May 12, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 - Stem Cells, Tissue Engineering, BioBanking & CAR-T Industries" report to their offering. Current regenerative medicine market is worth $18.9 billion globally, and will hit over $53 billion by 2021 According to the report ‘due to the dominance of the bone and joint reconstruction market, the US currently has the biggest space, followed by Europe. However, due to recent positive legislation in Japan and Europe, the stem cell arena will grow more substantially in these regions over the next five years. By 2021, it is possible that Europe will surpass the US market with respect to stem cell applications, and this will become more likely if the Trump Administration restricts legislation and funding’. The regenerative medicine market has massive scope and can be applied to a wide range of diseases and indications including neurological, autoimmune, cardiovascular, diabetes, musculoskeletal, ocular, orthopedic and wound healing. To that end, the expanse of market opportunities is large as are the patient populations globally. Kelly indicates that ‘this study has extensively profiled all major players in the market, analyzed their financials, pipeline products and business strategy going forward. It is the most comprehensive analysis on the market, and stakeholders wanting to gain a significant insight would greatly benefit from this information’. Financial forecasts to 2021 are included with respect to: Interestingly, the report also takes a detailed look at the CAR-T industry and its impact on the healthcare space. The CAR-T industry is addressing unmet needs in specific relapsed cancers, however does early clinical trial data support a blockbuster status for this upcoming therapy? The report also addresses the following key points: Key stakeholder questions are answered in this 680 page analysis including: Key Topics Covered: 1.0 Report Synopsis 1.1 Objectives of Report 1.2 Executive Summary 1.2 Key Questions Answered in this Report 1.3 Data Sources and Methodology 2.0 Introduction 2.1 Gurdon and Yamanaka Share the Nobel Prize 2.2 Stem Cell Clinical Trials: Initiated in 2010 2.3 Types of Stem Cells 2.4 Adult (Tissue) Stem Cells 2.5 Pluripotent Stem Cells 2.6 Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT) 2.7 Induced pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) 2.8 Mesenchymal Cells 2.9 Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells 2.10 Umbilical Cord Stem Cells 2.11 Heart Stem Cells 2.12 Mammary Stem Cells 2.13 Neural Stem Cells 2.14 Stem Cell Applications in Retinal Repair 2.15 Liver Stem Cells 2.16 Gut Stem Cells 2.16 Pancreatic Stem Cells 2.17 Epidermal Stem Cells 3.0 Stem Cells and Clinical Trials 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Pluripotent Stem Cells 3.3 Limbal Stem Cells 3.4 Neural Stem Cells 3.5 Endothelial Stem or Progenitor Cells 3.6 Placental Stem Cells 3.7 Why Do Stem Cell Clinical Trials Fail? 3.8 What is the Future of Stem Cell Trials? 3.9 Cutting Edge Stem Cell Clinical Trials 3.10 Ocata Therapeutics Current Stem Cell Trials 3.11 CHA Biotech Current Stem Cell Trials 3.12 Pfizer Current Stem Cell Trials 3.13 GSK Current Stem Cell Trials 3.14 Bayer Current Stem Cell Trials 3.15 Mesoblast International Current Stem Cell Trials 3.16 Millennium Pharmaceutical Current Stem Cell Trial 3.17 AstraZeneca Current Stem Cell Trials 3.18 Merck Current Stem Cell Trials 3.19 Chimerix Current Stem Cell Trials 3.20 Eisai Current Stem Cell Trials 3.21 SanBio Current Stem Cell Trials 3.22 Celgene Current Stem Cell Trials 3.23 StemCells Current Stem Cell Trials 3.24 Genzyme (Sanofi) Current Stem Cell Trials 3.25 Teva Current Stem Cell Trials 3.26 MedImmune Current Stem Cell Trials 3.27 Janssen Current Stem Cell Trials 3.28 Seattle Genetics Current Stem Cell Trials 3.29 Baxter Healthcare Current Stem Cell Trials 3.30 InCyte Corp Current Stem Cell Trials 4.0 Stem Cells, Disruptive Technology, Drug Discovery & Toxicity Testing 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Case Study: Genentech and Stem Cell Technology 4.3 3D Sphere Culture Systems 4.4 Stem Cells and High Throughput Screening 4.5 Genetic Instability of Stem Cells 4.6 Comprehensive in Vitro Proarrhythmia Assay (CiPA) & Cardiomyocytes 4.8 Coupling Precise Genome Editing (PGE) and iPSCs 4.9 Stem Cells & Toxicity Testing 4.10 Stem Cell Disease Models 4.11 Defining Human Disease Specific Phenotypes 4.12 Advantages of Stem Cell Derived Cells & Tissues for Drug Screening 5.0 Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.1 Pluripotent Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.2 Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.3 Neural Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.4 Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biomarkers 6.0 Manufacturing Stem Cell Products 6.1 Manufacturing Strategies For Stem Cell Products 6.2 BioProcess Economics for Stem Cell Products 6.3 Capital Investment 6.4 Cost of Goods 6.5 Bioprocess Economic Drivers & Strategies 6.6 hPSC Expansion & Differentiation using Planar Technology 6.7 hPSC Expansion using 3D Culture 6.8 Microcarrier Systems 6.9 Aggregate Suspension 6.10 Bioreactor Based Differentiation Strategy 6.11 Integrated hPSC Bioprocess Strategy 6.12 GMP Regulations and Stem Cell Products 7.0 Investment & Funding 7.1 What do Investors Want from Cell & Gene Therapy Companies? 7.2 What Makes a Good Investment? 7.3 What Types of Companies do Not Get Investment? 7.4 Global Funding 7.5 Cell & Gene Therapy Investment Going Forward 7.6 What Cell & Gene Companies are the Most Promising in 2017? 7.7 Insights into Investing in Cell and Gene Therapy Companies 8.0 Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 8.1 Market Overview 8.2 Global Frequency Analysis 8.3 Economics of Regenerative Medicine 8.4 Market Applications & Opportunities for Regenerative Therapies 8.5 Global Financial Landscape 8.6 Regenerative Medicine Clinical Trial Statistics 8.7 Regenerative Medicine Market Forecast to 2021 8.8 Regenerative Medicine Geographic Analysis and Forecast to 2021 8.9 Regenerative Medicine Geographical Location of Companies 8.10 Regenerative Medicine Technology Breakdown of Companies 8.11 Commercially Available Regenerative Medicine Products 8.12 Major Regenerative Medicine Milestones 9.0 Stem Cell Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 9.1 Autologous & Allogenic Cell Market Analysis 9.2 Stem Cell Market by Geography 9.3 Stem Cell Market Forecast by Therapeutic Indication 9.4 Stem Cell Reagent Market Trends 10.0 Tissue Engineering Tissue Engineering Market Analysis and Forecast to 2021 10.1 Geographical Analysis and Forecast to 2021 10.2 Geographical Analysis by Company Share 10.3 Tissue Engineering Clinical Indication Analysis & Forecast to 2021 11.0 Biobanking Market Analysis 11.1 Increasing Number of Cord Blood Banks Globally 11.2 Global Biobanking Company Sector Analysis & Breakdown 11.3 Allogenic Versus Autologous Transplant Frequency 11.4 Biobanking Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 11.5 Major Global Players 12.0 Global Access & Challenges of the Regenerative Medicine Market 12.1 Regenerative Medicine Market in the USA 12.2 Regenerative Medicine in Japan 12.3 Regenerative Medicine in China 12.4 Regenerative Medicine in South Korea 13.0 Cell and CAR T Therapy 13.1 Challenges Relating to Cell therapy and Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells in Immunotherapy 13.2 Regulations Pertaining to Immunotherapy, including Adoptive Cell Therapy (CAR-T and TCR) Immunotherapy Regulation in the USA 13.3 Regulations for Cell Therapy & Immunotherapy in Japan 13.4 European Regulation and Cell Therapy & Immunotherapeutics 13.5 Manufacturing of Immunotherapies 13.6 Supply Chain & Logistics 13.7 Pricing & Cost Analysis 14.0 Company Profiles 14.1 Astellas Institute for Regenerative Medicine (Ocata Therapeutics) 14.2 Athersys 14.3 Baxter International (Baxalta, Shire) 14.4 Caladrius Biosciences (NeoStem) 14.5 Cynata Therapeutics 14.6 Cytori Therapeutics 14.7 MEDIPOST 14.8 Mesoblast 14.9 NuVasive 14.10 Osiris Therapeutics 14.11 Plasticell 14.12 Pluristem Therapeutics 14.13 Pfizer 14.14 StemCells Inc 14.15 STEMCELL Technologies 14.16 Takara Bio 14.17 Tigenix 15.0 SWOT Industry Analysis For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/ml94n2/global

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