La Línea de la Concepción, Spain
La Línea de la Concepción, Spain

Time filter

Source Type

Browse tables and figures, 04 company profiles spread across 100 pages at http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/990233-global-stem-cells-market-research-report-2017.html . Global Stem Cells Market Report 2017 is a professional and in-depth survey on the current state of the Stem Cells industry. The report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Stem Cells market analysis is provided for the international market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions' development status. Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Region, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Stem Cells in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), like North America, China, Europe, Japan, India, Southeast Asia split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Stem Cells in each application. This report studies Stem Cells in global market, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering CCBC, Vcanbio, Boyalife and Beikebiotech. Place a direct purchase order of this report at http://www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=990233 . Cord Blood Stem Cells Industry 2017 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Cord Blood Stem Cells industry. Cord Blood Stem Cells report studies Cord Blood Stem Cells in Global market, especially in North America, China, Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2012 to 2016, and forecast to 2022. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, and revenue and market share for each manufacturer. With the tables and figures the report provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals. The Global Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) Industry 2017 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) industry. Firstly, the report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) market analysis is provided for the Global market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions' development status. Secondly, development policies and plans are discussed as well as manufacturing processes and cost structures. This report also states import/export, supply and consumption figures as well as cost, price, revenue and gross margin. This report studies Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) in Global market, focuses on price, sales, revenue of each type in Global. This report also focuses on the sales (consumption), production, import and export of Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) in global market, forecast to 2021, from 2016. Firstly, this report focuses on price, sales, revenue and growth rate of each type, as well as the types and each type price of key manufacturers, through interviewing key manufacturers. Second on basis of segments by manufacturers, this report focuses on the sales, price of each type, average price of Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs), and revenue and market share, for key manufacturers. The Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) industry development trends and marketing channels are also analyzed and the feasibility of new investment projects are assessed and overall research conclusions offered. ReportsnReports.com is your single source for all market research needs. Our database includes 500,000+ market research reports from over 95 leading global publishers & in-depth market research studies of over 5000 micro markets. With comprehensive information about the publishers and the industries for which they publish market research reports, we help you in your purchase decision by mapping your information needs with our huge collection of reports. We provide 24/7 online and offline support to our customers. Connect With Us On:


Browse tables and figures, 04 company profiles spread across 100 pages at http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/990233-global-stem-cells-market-research-report-2017.html . Global Stem Cells Market Report 2017 is a professional and in-depth survey on the current state of the Stem Cells industry. The report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Stem Cells market analysis is provided for the international market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions' development status. Market Segment by Regions, this report splits Global into several key Region, with production, consumption, revenue, market share and growth rate of Stem Cells in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), like North America, China, Europe, Japan, India, Southeast Asia split by product type, with production, revenue, price, market share and growth rate of each type Split by application, this report focuses on consumption, market share and growth rate of Stem Cells in each application. This report studies Stem Cells in global market, focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each manufacturer, covering CCBC, Vcanbio, Boyalife and Beikebiotech. Place a direct purchase order of this report at http://www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=990233 . Cord Blood Stem Cells Industry 2017 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Cord Blood Stem Cells industry. Cord Blood Stem Cells report studies Cord Blood Stem Cells in Global market, especially in North America, China, Europe, Southeast Asia, Japan and India, with production, revenue, consumption, import and export in these regions, from 2012 to 2016, and forecast to 2022. This report focuses on top manufacturers in global market, with production, price, and revenue and market share for each manufacturer. With the tables and figures the report provides key statistics on the state of the industry and is a valuable source of guidance and direction for companies and individuals. The Global Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) Industry 2017 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) industry. Firstly, the report provides a basic overview of the industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. The Human Embryonic Stem Cells (HESC) market analysis is provided for the Global market including development history, competitive landscape analysis, and major regions' development status. Secondly, development policies and plans are discussed as well as manufacturing processes and cost structures. This report also states import/export, supply and consumption figures as well as cost, price, revenue and gross margin. This report studies Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) in Global market, focuses on price, sales, revenue of each type in Global. This report also focuses on the sales (consumption), production, import and export of Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) in global market, forecast to 2021, from 2016. Firstly, this report focuses on price, sales, revenue and growth rate of each type, as well as the types and each type price of key manufacturers, through interviewing key manufacturers. Second on basis of segments by manufacturers, this report focuses on the sales, price of each type, average price of Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs), and revenue and market share, for key manufacturers. The Adipose Stem Cells (ASCs) industry development trends and marketing channels are also analyzed and the feasibility of new investment projects are assessed and overall research conclusions offered. ReportsnReports.com is your single source for all market research needs. Our database includes 500,000+ market research reports from over 95 leading global publishers & in-depth market research studies of over 5000 micro markets. With comprehensive information about the publishers and the industries for which they publish market research reports, we help you in your purchase decision by mapping your information needs with our huge collection of reports. We provide 24/7 online and offline support to our customers. Connect With Us On:


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

It is the "shock absorber" between the vertebrae of the spine, cushioning every step, bend and jump: the intervertebral disc. If the fibrocartilage tissue in the spine degenerates over time, an intervertebral disc can "slip" - pinching the medulla or nerves. The consequences include intense pain or even paralysis. Not only people, but also dogs are often susceptible to this disease. Since intervertebral discs themselves cannot regenerate, the affected disc material is removed in an operation that can be performed on both people and animals. The pressure on the nerves and medulla disappears, but the degeneration of the disc remains. Great hope has thus been placed on stem cell therapy as practiced by Frank Steffen, neurologist at the Clinic for Small Animal Surgery at the Vetsuisse Faculty of the University of Zurich. Stem cells are multipotent cells that can be differentiated into various cell types. Steffen hopes that the stem cells will possibly form new disc cartilage once injected into a damaged disc. His study on three sick German shepherds demonstrate that a treatment with the body's own stem cells are well tolerated - an important first step. Research on intervertebral disc regeneration is frequently performed using animal testing. At the Clinic for Small Animal Surgery in Zurich, researchers have taken another path: "Since we treat numerous dogs who spontaneously sustain a slipped disc every year, we have been able to gain important knowledge directly from animals that are actually afflicted with this disease," Frank Steffen explains. "Due to the similarity in pathology and the course of the illness, conclusions can presumably be drawn for the treatment of affected persons as well." The project for the development of stem cell therapy in dogs is being conducted in cooperation with Swiss Paraplegic Research (SPR) in Nottwil, Switzerland. The study on the sick German shepherds was organized as follows: With the permission of the dog owners, neurologist Frank Steffen and his team removed stem cells from the marrow of the pelvic bone of the affected animals. After the cleaning and preparation of the cell material in the laboratory, the stem cells were injected into the degenerated intervertebral disc during a disc operation that had become necessary for the animal in question. "Our objective is for the stem cells to trigger cellular and molecular repair processes and, ideally, to form new intervertebral disc cells in order to contribute to the regeneration of the tissue," Steffen says. The results are pleasing: The three dogs well tolerated the injections of their own stem cells and the researchers have determined no negative effects. However, later X-rays and magnetic resonance tomographies did not show clear indications that the damaged discs have already regenerated in comparison with the control group. Not yet - of that, Steffen is confident. "Proving the tolerability of the therapy was our first important step." Now he is working on the effectiveness of the stem cell injections, for example, with the targeted addition of growth factors. "If our method proves successful one day, it would be a pioneering step - for human medicine as well," the neurologist says. Frank Steffen, Lucas Smolders, Anne Roentgen, Alessandro Bertolo, and Jivko Stoyanov. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells as Autologous Therapy in Dogs with Naturally Occurring Intervertebral Disc Disease: Feasibility, Safety and Preliminary Results. Tissue Engineering Part C: Methods. 4 May 2017, ahead of print. doi:10.1089/ten.TEC.2017.0033


New Rochelle, NY, May 11, 2017--Researchers have shown that a novel cage constraint can prevent engineered cartilage from swelling during growth in culture, leading to better collagen stability and enhanced functional properties of the cartilage. The innovative cage system, designed to limit growth of engineered tissues within a fixed volume and shape while providing sufficient nutrients, is described in an article in Tissue Engineering, Part A, a peer-reviewed journal from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers. The article is part of a special issue on Musculoskeletal Tissue Engineering and is available free on the Tissue Engineering website until June 11, 2017. Robert Nims, Gerard Ateshian, PhD, and coauthors from Columbia University, New York, NY, created the cage constraint system for growing engineered cartilage in culture to overcome the common problem of osmotic swelling pressure, which destabilizes immature collagen, inhibiting the development of a strong collagen framework needed to support cartilage formation. The researchers studied the growth of engineered cartilage constructs in two different types of scaffolds -- agarose and cartilage-derived matrix hydrogel -- and compared it to unconstrained growth. In the article entitled "Constrained Cage Culture Improves Engineered Cartilage Functional Properties by Enhancing Collagen Network Stability," the authors report the differences in swelling-induced expansion, functional properties, and collagen content of the cartilage constructs grown in the two types of scaffolds or under unconstrained conditions. "The management of mechanical forces in the development of engineered tissues is emerging as an important aspect of control. In this study, three-dimensional constraint is shown to make an important contribution to appropriate tissue maturation," says Tissue Engineering Co-Editor-in-Chief Peter C. Johnson, MD, Principal, MedSurgPI, LLC and President and CEO, Scintellix, LLC, Raleigh, NC. Research reported in this publication was supported by the National Institutes of Health under Award Numbers R01 AR060361, R01 AR046568, R01 DE016525, and P41 EB002520. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. Tissue Engineering is an authoritative peer-reviewed journal published monthly online and in print in three parts: Part A, the flagship journal published 24 times per year; Part B: Reviews, published bimonthly, and Part C: Methods, published 12 times per year. Led by Co-Editors-In-Chief Antonios G. Mikos, PhD, Louis Calder Professor at Rice University, Houston, TX, and Peter C. Johnson, MD, Principal, MedSurgPI, LLC and President and CEO, Scintellix, LLC, Raleigh, NC, the Journal brings together scientific and medical experts in the fields of biomedical engineering, material science, molecular and cellular biology, and genetic engineering. Tissue Engineering is the official journal of the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society (TERMIS). Complete tables of content and a sample issue may be viewed online at the Tissue Engineering website. Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers is a privately held, fully integrated media company known for establishing authoritative peer-reviewed journals in many promising areas of science and biomedical research, including Stem Cells and Development, Human Gene Therapy, and Advances in Wound Care. Its biotechnology trade magazine, GEN (Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News), was the first in its field and is today the industry's most widely read publication worldwide. A complete list of the firm's 80 journals, books, and newsmagazines is available on the Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers website.


Dublin, May 12, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 - Stem Cells, Tissue Engineering, BioBanking & CAR-T Industries" report to their offering. Current regenerative medicine market is worth $18.9 billion globally, and will hit over $53 billion by 2021 According to the report ‘due to the dominance of the bone and joint reconstruction market, the US currently has the biggest space, followed by Europe. However, due to recent positive legislation in Japan and Europe, the stem cell arena will grow more substantially in these regions over the next five years. By 2021, it is possible that Europe will surpass the US market with respect to stem cell applications, and this will become more likely if the Trump Administration restricts legislation and funding’. The regenerative medicine market has massive scope and can be applied to a wide range of diseases and indications including neurological, autoimmune, cardiovascular, diabetes, musculoskeletal, ocular, orthopedic and wound healing. To that end, the expanse of market opportunities is large as are the patient populations globally. Kelly indicates that ‘this study has extensively profiled all major players in the market, analyzed their financials, pipeline products and business strategy going forward. It is the most comprehensive analysis on the market, and stakeholders wanting to gain a significant insight would greatly benefit from this information’. Financial forecasts to 2021 are included with respect to: Interestingly, the report also takes a detailed look at the CAR-T industry and its impact on the healthcare space. The CAR-T industry is addressing unmet needs in specific relapsed cancers, however does early clinical trial data support a blockbuster status for this upcoming therapy? The report also addresses the following key points: Key stakeholder questions are answered in this 680 page analysis including: Key Topics Covered: 1.0 Report Synopsis 1.1 Objectives of Report 1.2 Executive Summary 1.2 Key Questions Answered in this Report 1.3 Data Sources and Methodology 2.0 Introduction 2.1 Gurdon and Yamanaka Share the Nobel Prize 2.2 Stem Cell Clinical Trials: Initiated in 2010 2.3 Types of Stem Cells 2.4 Adult (Tissue) Stem Cells 2.5 Pluripotent Stem Cells 2.6 Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT) 2.7 Induced pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) 2.8 Mesenchymal Cells 2.9 Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells 2.10 Umbilical Cord Stem Cells 2.11 Heart Stem Cells 2.12 Mammary Stem Cells 2.13 Neural Stem Cells 2.14 Stem Cell Applications in Retinal Repair 2.15 Liver Stem Cells 2.16 Gut Stem Cells 2.16 Pancreatic Stem Cells 2.17 Epidermal Stem Cells 3.0 Stem Cells and Clinical Trials 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Pluripotent Stem Cells 3.3 Limbal Stem Cells 3.4 Neural Stem Cells 3.5 Endothelial Stem or Progenitor Cells 3.6 Placental Stem Cells 3.7 Why Do Stem Cell Clinical Trials Fail? 3.8 What is the Future of Stem Cell Trials? 3.9 Cutting Edge Stem Cell Clinical Trials 3.10 Ocata Therapeutics Current Stem Cell Trials 3.11 CHA Biotech Current Stem Cell Trials 3.12 Pfizer Current Stem Cell Trials 3.13 GSK Current Stem Cell Trials 3.14 Bayer Current Stem Cell Trials 3.15 Mesoblast International Current Stem Cell Trials 3.16 Millennium Pharmaceutical Current Stem Cell Trial 3.17 AstraZeneca Current Stem Cell Trials 3.18 Merck Current Stem Cell Trials 3.19 Chimerix Current Stem Cell Trials 3.20 Eisai Current Stem Cell Trials 3.21 SanBio Current Stem Cell Trials 3.22 Celgene Current Stem Cell Trials 3.23 StemCells Current Stem Cell Trials 3.24 Genzyme (Sanofi) Current Stem Cell Trials 3.25 Teva Current Stem Cell Trials 3.26 MedImmune Current Stem Cell Trials 3.27 Janssen Current Stem Cell Trials 3.28 Seattle Genetics Current Stem Cell Trials 3.29 Baxter Healthcare Current Stem Cell Trials 3.30 InCyte Corp Current Stem Cell Trials 4.0 Stem Cells, Disruptive Technology, Drug Discovery & Toxicity Testing 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Case Study: Genentech and Stem Cell Technology 4.3 3D Sphere Culture Systems 4.4 Stem Cells and High Throughput Screening 4.5 Genetic Instability of Stem Cells 4.6 Comprehensive in Vitro Proarrhythmia Assay (CiPA) & Cardiomyocytes 4.8 Coupling Precise Genome Editing (PGE) and iPSCs 4.9 Stem Cells & Toxicity Testing 4.10 Stem Cell Disease Models 4.11 Defining Human Disease Specific Phenotypes 4.12 Advantages of Stem Cell Derived Cells & Tissues for Drug Screening 5.0 Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.1 Pluripotent Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.2 Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.3 Neural Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.4 Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biomarkers 6.0 Manufacturing Stem Cell Products 6.1 Manufacturing Strategies For Stem Cell Products 6.2 BioProcess Economics for Stem Cell Products 6.3 Capital Investment 6.4 Cost of Goods 6.5 Bioprocess Economic Drivers & Strategies 6.6 hPSC Expansion & Differentiation using Planar Technology 6.7 hPSC Expansion using 3D Culture 6.8 Microcarrier Systems 6.9 Aggregate Suspension 6.10 Bioreactor Based Differentiation Strategy 6.11 Integrated hPSC Bioprocess Strategy 6.12 GMP Regulations and Stem Cell Products 7.0 Investment & Funding 7.1 What do Investors Want from Cell & Gene Therapy Companies? 7.2 What Makes a Good Investment? 7.3 What Types of Companies do Not Get Investment? 7.4 Global Funding 7.5 Cell & Gene Therapy Investment Going Forward 7.6 What Cell & Gene Companies are the Most Promising in 2017? 7.7 Insights into Investing in Cell and Gene Therapy Companies 8.0 Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 8.1 Market Overview 8.2 Global Frequency Analysis 8.3 Economics of Regenerative Medicine 8.4 Market Applications & Opportunities for Regenerative Therapies 8.5 Global Financial Landscape 8.6 Regenerative Medicine Clinical Trial Statistics 8.7 Regenerative Medicine Market Forecast to 2021 8.8 Regenerative Medicine Geographic Analysis and Forecast to 2021 8.9 Regenerative Medicine Geographical Location of Companies 8.10 Regenerative Medicine Technology Breakdown of Companies 8.11 Commercially Available Regenerative Medicine Products 8.12 Major Regenerative Medicine Milestones 9.0 Stem Cell Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 9.1 Autologous & Allogenic Cell Market Analysis 9.2 Stem Cell Market by Geography 9.3 Stem Cell Market Forecast by Therapeutic Indication 9.4 Stem Cell Reagent Market Trends 10.0 Tissue Engineering Tissue Engineering Market Analysis and Forecast to 2021 10.1 Geographical Analysis and Forecast to 2021 10.2 Geographical Analysis by Company Share 10.3 Tissue Engineering Clinical Indication Analysis & Forecast to 2021 11.0 Biobanking Market Analysis 11.1 Increasing Number of Cord Blood Banks Globally 11.2 Global Biobanking Company Sector Analysis & Breakdown 11.3 Allogenic Versus Autologous Transplant Frequency 11.4 Biobanking Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 11.5 Major Global Players 12.0 Global Access & Challenges of the Regenerative Medicine Market 12.1 Regenerative Medicine Market in the USA 12.2 Regenerative Medicine in Japan 12.3 Regenerative Medicine in China 12.4 Regenerative Medicine in South Korea 13.0 Cell and CAR T Therapy 13.1 Challenges Relating to Cell therapy and Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells in Immunotherapy 13.2 Regulations Pertaining to Immunotherapy, including Adoptive Cell Therapy (CAR-T and TCR) Immunotherapy Regulation in the USA 13.3 Regulations for Cell Therapy & Immunotherapy in Japan 13.4 European Regulation and Cell Therapy & Immunotherapeutics 13.5 Manufacturing of Immunotherapies 13.6 Supply Chain & Logistics 13.7 Pricing & Cost Analysis 14.0 Company Profiles 14.1 Astellas Institute for Regenerative Medicine (Ocata Therapeutics) 14.2 Athersys 14.3 Baxter International (Baxalta, Shire) 14.4 Caladrius Biosciences (NeoStem) 14.5 Cynata Therapeutics 14.6 Cytori Therapeutics 14.7 MEDIPOST 14.8 Mesoblast 14.9 NuVasive 14.10 Osiris Therapeutics 14.11 Plasticell 14.12 Pluristem Therapeutics 14.13 Pfizer 14.14 StemCells Inc 14.15 STEMCELL Technologies 14.16 Takara Bio 14.17 Tigenix 15.0 SWOT Industry Analysis For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/ml94n2/global


Dublin, May 12, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Research and Markets has announced the addition of the "Global Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 - Stem Cells, Tissue Engineering, BioBanking & CAR-T Industries" report to their offering. Current regenerative medicine market is worth $18.9 billion globally, and will hit over $53 billion by 2021 According to the report ‘due to the dominance of the bone and joint reconstruction market, the US currently has the biggest space, followed by Europe. However, due to recent positive legislation in Japan and Europe, the stem cell arena will grow more substantially in these regions over the next five years. By 2021, it is possible that Europe will surpass the US market with respect to stem cell applications, and this will become more likely if the Trump Administration restricts legislation and funding’. The regenerative medicine market has massive scope and can be applied to a wide range of diseases and indications including neurological, autoimmune, cardiovascular, diabetes, musculoskeletal, ocular, orthopedic and wound healing. To that end, the expanse of market opportunities is large as are the patient populations globally. Kelly indicates that ‘this study has extensively profiled all major players in the market, analyzed their financials, pipeline products and business strategy going forward. It is the most comprehensive analysis on the market, and stakeholders wanting to gain a significant insight would greatly benefit from this information’. Financial forecasts to 2021 are included with respect to: Interestingly, the report also takes a detailed look at the CAR-T industry and its impact on the healthcare space. The CAR-T industry is addressing unmet needs in specific relapsed cancers, however does early clinical trial data support a blockbuster status for this upcoming therapy? The report also addresses the following key points: Key stakeholder questions are answered in this 680 page analysis including: Key Topics Covered: 1.0 Report Synopsis 1.1 Objectives of Report 1.2 Executive Summary 1.2 Key Questions Answered in this Report 1.3 Data Sources and Methodology 2.0 Introduction 2.1 Gurdon and Yamanaka Share the Nobel Prize 2.2 Stem Cell Clinical Trials: Initiated in 2010 2.3 Types of Stem Cells 2.4 Adult (Tissue) Stem Cells 2.5 Pluripotent Stem Cells 2.6 Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer (SCNT) 2.7 Induced pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) 2.8 Mesenchymal Cells 2.9 Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells 2.10 Umbilical Cord Stem Cells 2.11 Heart Stem Cells 2.12 Mammary Stem Cells 2.13 Neural Stem Cells 2.14 Stem Cell Applications in Retinal Repair 2.15 Liver Stem Cells 2.16 Gut Stem Cells 2.16 Pancreatic Stem Cells 2.17 Epidermal Stem Cells 3.0 Stem Cells and Clinical Trials 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Pluripotent Stem Cells 3.3 Limbal Stem Cells 3.4 Neural Stem Cells 3.5 Endothelial Stem or Progenitor Cells 3.6 Placental Stem Cells 3.7 Why Do Stem Cell Clinical Trials Fail? 3.8 What is the Future of Stem Cell Trials? 3.9 Cutting Edge Stem Cell Clinical Trials 3.10 Ocata Therapeutics Current Stem Cell Trials 3.11 CHA Biotech Current Stem Cell Trials 3.12 Pfizer Current Stem Cell Trials 3.13 GSK Current Stem Cell Trials 3.14 Bayer Current Stem Cell Trials 3.15 Mesoblast International Current Stem Cell Trials 3.16 Millennium Pharmaceutical Current Stem Cell Trial 3.17 AstraZeneca Current Stem Cell Trials 3.18 Merck Current Stem Cell Trials 3.19 Chimerix Current Stem Cell Trials 3.20 Eisai Current Stem Cell Trials 3.21 SanBio Current Stem Cell Trials 3.22 Celgene Current Stem Cell Trials 3.23 StemCells Current Stem Cell Trials 3.24 Genzyme (Sanofi) Current Stem Cell Trials 3.25 Teva Current Stem Cell Trials 3.26 MedImmune Current Stem Cell Trials 3.27 Janssen Current Stem Cell Trials 3.28 Seattle Genetics Current Stem Cell Trials 3.29 Baxter Healthcare Current Stem Cell Trials 3.30 InCyte Corp Current Stem Cell Trials 4.0 Stem Cells, Disruptive Technology, Drug Discovery & Toxicity Testing 4.1 Introduction 4.2 Case Study: Genentech and Stem Cell Technology 4.3 3D Sphere Culture Systems 4.4 Stem Cells and High Throughput Screening 4.5 Genetic Instability of Stem Cells 4.6 Comprehensive in Vitro Proarrhythmia Assay (CiPA) & Cardiomyocytes 4.8 Coupling Precise Genome Editing (PGE) and iPSCs 4.9 Stem Cells & Toxicity Testing 4.10 Stem Cell Disease Models 4.11 Defining Human Disease Specific Phenotypes 4.12 Advantages of Stem Cell Derived Cells & Tissues for Drug Screening 5.0 Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.1 Pluripotent Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.2 Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.3 Neural Stem Cell Biomarkers 5.4 Hematopoietic Stem Cell Biomarkers 6.0 Manufacturing Stem Cell Products 6.1 Manufacturing Strategies For Stem Cell Products 6.2 BioProcess Economics for Stem Cell Products 6.3 Capital Investment 6.4 Cost of Goods 6.5 Bioprocess Economic Drivers & Strategies 6.6 hPSC Expansion & Differentiation using Planar Technology 6.7 hPSC Expansion using 3D Culture 6.8 Microcarrier Systems 6.9 Aggregate Suspension 6.10 Bioreactor Based Differentiation Strategy 6.11 Integrated hPSC Bioprocess Strategy 6.12 GMP Regulations and Stem Cell Products 7.0 Investment & Funding 7.1 What do Investors Want from Cell & Gene Therapy Companies? 7.2 What Makes a Good Investment? 7.3 What Types of Companies do Not Get Investment? 7.4 Global Funding 7.5 Cell & Gene Therapy Investment Going Forward 7.6 What Cell & Gene Companies are the Most Promising in 2017? 7.7 Insights into Investing in Cell and Gene Therapy Companies 8.0 Regenerative Medicine Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 8.1 Market Overview 8.2 Global Frequency Analysis 8.3 Economics of Regenerative Medicine 8.4 Market Applications & Opportunities for Regenerative Therapies 8.5 Global Financial Landscape 8.6 Regenerative Medicine Clinical Trial Statistics 8.7 Regenerative Medicine Market Forecast to 2021 8.8 Regenerative Medicine Geographic Analysis and Forecast to 2021 8.9 Regenerative Medicine Geographical Location of Companies 8.10 Regenerative Medicine Technology Breakdown of Companies 8.11 Commercially Available Regenerative Medicine Products 8.12 Major Regenerative Medicine Milestones 9.0 Stem Cell Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 9.1 Autologous & Allogenic Cell Market Analysis 9.2 Stem Cell Market by Geography 9.3 Stem Cell Market Forecast by Therapeutic Indication 9.4 Stem Cell Reagent Market Trends 10.0 Tissue Engineering Tissue Engineering Market Analysis and Forecast to 2021 10.1 Geographical Analysis and Forecast to 2021 10.2 Geographical Analysis by Company Share 10.3 Tissue Engineering Clinical Indication Analysis & Forecast to 2021 11.0 Biobanking Market Analysis 11.1 Increasing Number of Cord Blood Banks Globally 11.2 Global Biobanking Company Sector Analysis & Breakdown 11.3 Allogenic Versus Autologous Transplant Frequency 11.4 Biobanking Market Analysis & Forecast to 2021 11.5 Major Global Players 12.0 Global Access & Challenges of the Regenerative Medicine Market 12.1 Regenerative Medicine Market in the USA 12.2 Regenerative Medicine in Japan 12.3 Regenerative Medicine in China 12.4 Regenerative Medicine in South Korea 13.0 Cell and CAR T Therapy 13.1 Challenges Relating to Cell therapy and Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells in Immunotherapy 13.2 Regulations Pertaining to Immunotherapy, including Adoptive Cell Therapy (CAR-T and TCR) Immunotherapy Regulation in the USA 13.3 Regulations for Cell Therapy & Immunotherapy in Japan 13.4 European Regulation and Cell Therapy & Immunotherapeutics 13.5 Manufacturing of Immunotherapies 13.6 Supply Chain & Logistics 13.7 Pricing & Cost Analysis 14.0 Company Profiles 14.1 Astellas Institute for Regenerative Medicine (Ocata Therapeutics) 14.2 Athersys 14.3 Baxter International (Baxalta, Shire) 14.4 Caladrius Biosciences (NeoStem) 14.5 Cynata Therapeutics 14.6 Cytori Therapeutics 14.7 MEDIPOST 14.8 Mesoblast 14.9 NuVasive 14.10 Osiris Therapeutics 14.11 Plasticell 14.12 Pluristem Therapeutics 14.13 Pfizer 14.14 StemCells Inc 14.15 STEMCELL Technologies 14.16 Takara Bio 14.17 Tigenix 15.0 SWOT Industry Analysis For more information about this report visit http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/ml94n2/global


News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Reported in Nature today, one of the largest sets of high quality human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from healthy individuals has been produced by a consortium involving the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute. Comprehensively annotated and available for independent research*, the hundreds of stem cell lines are a powerful resource for scientists studying human development and disease. With collaborative partners from King's College London, the European Bioinformatics Institute, the University of Dundee and the University of Cambridge, the study also investigates in unprecedented detail the extensive variation between stem cells from different healthy people. Technological advancements have made it possible to take an adult cell and use specific growth conditions to turn back the clock - returning it to an early embryonic state. This results in an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC), which can develop into any type of cell in the body. These iPSCs have huge scientific potential for studying the development and the impact of diseases including cancer, Alzheimer's, and heart disease. However, the process of creating an iPSC is long and complicated and few laboratories have the facilities to characterise their cells in a way that makes them useful for other scientists to use. The Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Initiative (HipSci) project used standardised methods to generate iPSCs on a large scale to study the differences between healthy people. Reference sets of stem cells were generated from skin biopsies donated by 301 healthy volunteers, creating multiple stem cell lines from each person. The researchers created 711 cell lines and generated detailed information about their genome, the proteins expressed in them, and the cell biology of each cell line. Lines and data generated by this initiative are available to academic researchers and industry. Dr Daniel Gaffney, a lead author on the paper, from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, said: "We have created a comprehensive, high quality reference set of human induced pluripotent stem cell lines from healthy volunteers. Each of these stem cell lines has been extensively characterised and made available to the wider research community along with the annotation data. This resource is a stepping stone for researchers to make better cell models of many diseases, because they can study disease risk in many cell types, including those that are normally inaccessible." By creating more than one stem cell line from each healthy individual, the researchers were able to determine the similarity of stem cell lines from the same person. Prof Fiona Watt, a lead author on the paper and co-principal investigator of HipSci, from King's College London, said: "Many other efforts to create stem cells focus on rare diseases. In our study, stem cells have been produced from hundreds of healthy volunteers to study common genetic variation. We were able to show similar characteristics of iPS cells from the same person, and revealed that up to 46 per cent of the differences we saw in iPS cells were due to differences between individuals. These data will allow researchers to put disease variations in context with healthy people." The project, which has taken 4 years to complete, required a multidisciplinary approach with many different collaborators, who specialised in different aspects of creating the cell lines and characterising the data. Dr Oliver Stegle, a lead author on the paper, from the European Bioinformatics Institute, said: "This study was only possible due to the large scale, systematic production and characterisation of the stem cell lines. To help us to understand the different properties of the cells, we collected extensive data on multiple molecular layers, from the genome of the lines to their cell biology. This type of phenotyping required a whole facility rather than just a single lab, and will provide a huge resource to other scientists. Already, the data being generated have helped to gain a clearer picture of what a typical human iPSC cell looks like." Dr Michael Dunn, Head of Genetics and Molecular Sciences at Wellcome, said: "This is the fantastic result of many years of work to create a national resource of high quality, well-characterised human induced pluripotent stem cells. This has been a significant achievement made possible by the collaboration of researchers across the country with joint funding provided by Wellcome and the MRC. It will help to provide the knowledge base to underpin a huge amount of future research into the effects of our genes on health and disease. By ensuring this resource is openly available to all, we hope that it will pave the way for many more fascinating discoveries." *Data and cell lines from this study are being made available through http://www. , the European Collection of Authenticated Cell Cultures (ECACC) and the European Bank for Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (EBiSC). Hipsci brings together diverse constituents in genomics, proteomics, cell biology and clinical genetics to create a global induced pluripotent stem cell resource for the research community. http://www. King's College London is one of the top 25 universities in the world (2016/17 QS World University Rankings) and among the oldest in England. King's has more than 29,600 students (of whom nearly 11,700 are graduate students) from some 150 countries worldwide, and some 8,000 staff. King's has an outstanding reputation for world-class teaching and cutting-edge research. In the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF), eighty-four per cent of research at King's was deemed 'world-leading' or 'internationally excellent' (3* and 4*). Since our foundation, King's students and staff have dedicated themselves in the service of society. King's will continue to focus on world-leading education, research and service, and will have an increasingly proactive role to play in a more interconnected, complex world. Visit our website to find out more about Vision 2029, King's strategic vision for the next 12 years to 2029, which will be the 200th anniversary of the founding of the university. http://www. The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI) is a global leader in the storage, analysis and dissemination of large biological datasets. EMBL-EBI helps scientists realise the potential of 'big data' by enhancing their ability to exploit complex information to make discoveries that benefit humankind. EMBL-EBI is at the forefront of computational biology research, with work spanning sequence analysis methods, multi-dimensional statistical analysis and data-driven biological discovery, from plant biology to mammalian development and disease. We are part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), an international, innovative and interdisciplinary research organisation funded by 22 member states and two associate member states, and are located on the Wellcome Genome Campus, one of the world's largest concentrations of scientific and technical expertise in genomics. http://www. The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute is one of the world's leading genome centres. Through its ability to conduct research at scale, it is able to engage in bold and long-term exploratory projects that are designed to influence and empower medical science globally. Institute research findings, generated through its own research programmes and through its leading role in international consortia, are being used to develop new diagnostics and treatments for human disease. http://www. Wellcome exists to improve health for everyone by helping great ideas to thrive. We're a global charitable foundation, both politically and financially independent. We support scientists and researchers, take on big problems, fuel imaginations and spark debate. http://www.

Loading Stem Cells collaborators
Loading Stem Cells collaborators