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Curceanu C.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy | Curceanu C.,Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering | Bartalucci S.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy | Bragadireanu M.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy | And 24 more authors.
International Journal of Quantum Information | Year: 2011

The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP) is one of the basic principles of modern physics. Being at the very basis of our understanding of matter, as many other fundamental principles it spurs, presently, a lively debate on its possible limits, deeply rooted in the very foundations of Quantum Field Theory. Therefore, it is extremely important to test the limits of its validity. Quon theory provides a suitable mathematical framework of possible violation of PEP, where the violation parameter q translates into a probability of violating PEP. Experimentally, setting a bound on PEP violation means confining the violation parameter to a value very close to either 1 (for bosons) or -1 (for fermions). The VIP (VIolation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment established a limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper. We describe the experimental method, the obtained results, both in terms of the q-parameter from quon theory and as probability of PEP violation, we briefly discuss them and present future plans to go beyond the actual limit by upgrading the experimental technique using vetoed new spectroscopical fast Silicon Drift Detectors. We also shortly mention the possibility of using a similar experimental technique to search for eventual X-rays, generated in the spontaneous collapse models. © 2011 World Scientific Publishing Company. Source


Curceanu C.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy | Curceanu C.,Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering | Curceanu C.,Museo Storico della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi | Bartalucci S.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy | And 34 more authors.
Physica Scripta | Year: 2015

The spin-statistics connection, in particular the Pauli exclusion principle (PEP), plays a very important role in our comprehension of matter and nature. Presently, the PEP violation, possible within some theories, generates a lively debate; it has given birth to a few experiments looking for tiny effects. The violation of the Pauli exclusion principle experiment put a very strong limit on the PEP violation probability by electrons, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in a copper target. In this paper we present this experiment, the obtained results and future plans to upgrade the experimental setup with fast silicon drift detectors. We then present the idea of using an analogous experimental technique to search for x-rays as a signature of the spontaneous collapse of the wave function, predicted by the continuous spontaneous localization theories, and some very encouraging preliminary results. © 2014 The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences. Source


Marton J.,Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics | Bartalucci S.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy | Bertolucci S.,CERN | Bragadireanu M.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy | And 22 more authors.
AIP Conference Proceedings | Year: 2011

One of the fundamental rules of nature and a pillar in the foundation of quantum theory and thus of modern physics is represented by the Pauli Exclusion Principle. We know that this principle is extremely well fulfilled due to many observations like the order of the elements and the stability of matter. Numerous experiments were performed to search for tiny violation of this rule in various systems. The VIP experiment at Gran Sasso underground laboratory is testing the validity of this principle for electrons with very high precision (orderof10-30). The layout of the present experiment, results obtained so far and new ideas to further increase the precision will be presented. © 2011 American Institute of Physics. Source


Curceanu C.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy | Curceanu C.,Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering | Bartalucci S.,National Institute of Nuclear Physics, Italy | Bertolucci S.,CERN | And 24 more authors.
Physics Procedia | Year: 2011

The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP), as a consequence or the spin-statistics connection, is one of the basic principles of the modern physics. Being at the very basis of our understanding of matter, it spurs a lively debate on its possible limits, deeply rooted as it is in the very foundations of Quantum Field Theory. The VIP (VIolation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment established the world's best limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper. We describe the experimental method and the obtained results; we briefly present future plans to go beyond the actual limit by upgrading the experiment using vetoed new spectroscopic fast Silicon Drift Detectors. We also shortly mention the possibility of using a similar experimental technique to search for possible X-rays generated in the spontaneous collapse models of quantum mechanics. © 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V. Source


Juhasz B.,Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics | Widmann E.,Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics | Federmann S.,Stefan Meyer Institute for Subatomic Physics | Federmann S.,CERN
Journal of Physics: Conference Series | Year: 2011

The ASACUSA collaboration at the Antiproton Decelerator of CERN is planning to measure the ground-state hyperfine splitting of antihydrogen using an atomic beam line, consisting of a cusp trap as a source of partially polarized antihydrogen atoms, a radiofrequency spin-flip cavity, a superconducting sextupole magnet as spin analyser, and an antihydrogen detector. This will be a measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment, and also a test of the CPT invariance. Monte Carlo simulations predict that the antihydrogen ground-state hyperfine splitting can be determined with a relative precision of ∼10 -7. The first preliminary measurements of the hyperfine transitions will start in 2011. Source

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