Entity

Time filter

Source Type

United Kingdom

Lambert S.R.,Emory University | Buckley E.G.,Duke University | Drews-Botsch C.,Emory University | DuBois L.,Emory University | And 72 more authors.
Archives of Ophthalmology | Year: 2010

Objective: To compare the use of contact lenses and intraocular lenses (IOLs) for the optical correction of unilateral aphakia during infancy. Methods: In a randomized, multicenter (12 sites) clinical trial, 114 infants with unilateral congenital cataracts were assigned to undergo cataract surgery with or without IOL implantation. Children randomized to IOL treatment had their residual refractive error corrected with spectacles. Children randomized to no IOL treatment had their aphakia treated with a contact lens. Main Outcome Measures: Grating acuity at 12 months of age and HOTV visual acuity at 41/2 years of age. Application to Clinical Practice: This study should determine whether either treatment for an infant with a visually significant unilateral congenital cataract results in a better visual outcome. Results: Enrollment began December 23, 2004, and was completed January 16, 2009. The median age at the time of cataract surgery was 1.8 months. Fifty patients were 4 to 6 weeksofageatthetimeofenrollment;32,7weeksto3months ofage;andtheremaining32, morethan3tolessthan7months of age. Fifty-seven children were randomized to each treatment group. Eyes with cataracts had shorter axial lengths and steeper corneas on average than the fellow eyes. Conclusions: The optimal optical treatment of aphakia in infants is unknown. However, the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study was designed to provide empirical evidence of whether optical treatment with an IOL or a contact lens after unilateral cataract surgery during infancy is associated with a better visual outcome. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00212134. ©2010 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. Source


Ananworanich J.,Red Cross | Ananworanich J.,Chulalongkorn University | Ananworanich J.,University of New South Wales | Bunupuradah T.,Red Cross | And 144 more authors.
AIDS Research and Therapy | Year: 2014

Background: This study assesses the relationships between lymphocyte and monocyte subsets and intelligence quotient (IQ) scores in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive, HIV-infected Thai children without advanced HIV disease.Findings: Sixty-seven ART-naive Thai children with CD4 between 15-24% underwent cognitive testing by Weschler intelligence scale and had 13 cell subsets performed by flow cytometry including naive, memory and activated subsets of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, activated and perivascular monocytes and B cells. Regression modelling with log10 cell count and cell percentage transformation was performed.Median age (IQR) was 9 (7-10) years, 33% were male, CDC stages N:A:B were 1:67:31%, median CD4% and count (IQR) were 21 (18-24)%, 597 (424-801) cells/mm3 and HIV RNA (IQR) was 4.6 (4.1-4.9) log10 copies/ml. Most (82%) lived at home, 45% had a biological parent as their primary caregiver, and 26 (49%) had low family income. The mean (SD) scores were 75 (13) for full scale IQ (FIQ), 73 (12) for verbal IQ (VIQ) and 80 (14) for performance IQ (PIQ). Adjusted multivariate regression analysis showed significant negative associations between B cell counts and FIQ, VIQ and PIQ (p < 0.01 for all); similar associations were found for B cell percentages (p < 0.05 for all).Conclusions: High B cell counts and percentages were strongly associated with poorer FIQ, VIQ and PIQ scores. Prospective, long-term assessment of cell subsets and determination of relevant B cell subpopulations could help further elucidate associations between lymphocyte subsets and neurocognitive development. © 2014 Ananworanich et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Suarez-Garcia I.,Infectious Diseases Unit | Sobrino-Vegas P.,National Epidemiology Center | Tejada A.,Ramon y Cajal Hospital | Viciana P.,Virgen del Rocio Hospital | And 28 more authors.
HIV Medicine | Year: 2014

Objectives: The aim of the study was to assess the adequacy of initial antiretroviral therapy (ART), in terms of its timing and the choice of regimens, according to the Spanish national treatment guidelines [Spanish AIDS Study Group-National Plan for AIDS (GeSIDA-PNS) Guidelines] for treatment-naïve HIV-infected patients. Methods: A prospective cohort study of HIV-positive ART-naïve subjects attending 27 centres in Spain from 2004 to 2010 was carried out. Regimens were classified as recommended, alternative or nonrecommended according to the guidelines. Delayed start of treatment was defined as starting treatment later than 12 months after the patient had fulfilled the treatment criteria. Multivariate logistic and Cox regression analyses were performed. Results: A total of 6225 ART-naïve patients were included in the study. Of 4516 patients who started treatment, 91.5% started with a recommended or alternative treatment. The use of a nonrecommended treatment was associated with a CD4 count>500 cells/μL [odds ratio (OR) 2.03; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.14-3.59], hepatitis B (OR 2.23; 95% CI 1.50-3.33), treatment in a hospital with <500 beds, and starting treatment in the years 2004-2006. Fourteen per cent of the patients had a delayed initiation of treatment. Delayed initiation of treatment was more likely in injecting drug users, patients with hepatitis C, patients with higher CD4 counts and during the years 2004-2006, and it was less likely in patients with viral loads>5 log HIV-1 RNA copies/ml. The use of a nonrecommended regimen was significantly associated with mortality [hazard ratio (HR) 1.61; 95% CI 1.03-2.52; P=0.035] and lack of virological response. Conclusions: Compliance with the recommendations of Spanish national guidelines was high with respect to the timing and choice of initial ART. The use of nonrecommended regimens was associated with a lack of virological response and higher mortality. © 2013 British HIV Association. Source

Discover hidden collaborations