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Bekkers R.,TU Eindhoven | Bekkers R.,Dialogic | Bongard R.,Statistics Netherlands | Nuvolari A.,Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies
Research Policy | Year: 2011

In the field of compatibility standards, an increasing number of companies claim to own so-called essential patents (i.e. those patents that are indispensable for designing and manufacturing products conforming to the standard). It is widely believed that the ownership of such patents is a very valuable bargaining tool in cross-license negotiations, while for non-producing firms such patents may result in a substantial stream of licensing revenues. In this paper we study the determinants of essential patent claims in compatibility standards. In particular, we assess the role of two main factors: the significance of the technological solution contained in the patent and the involvement of the applicant of the patent in the standardisation process. We examine the case of W-CDMA, one of the most successful standards in mobile telecommunications. We compare the patents claimed essential for this standard with a control group of randomly selected, unclaimed patents covering the same time period and technology classes. We find empirical evidence that both factors have significant impact on the probability that a patent is claimed as essential, but the involvement in the standardisation process is a stronger determinant than the technical value ('merit') of the patent. On the basis of our findings, we offer policy recommendations. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


News Article | March 1, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP), the world’s leading professional association dedicated to the practice of alliance management, partnering, and business collaboration, announced its annual Alliance Excellence Awards winners at the 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Partnering Enterprise,” Feb. 28–March 2, at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, Calif. USA. The awards were presented in four categories: Individual Alliance Excellence, Innovative Best Alliance Practice, Alliance Program Excellence, and Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility. Two ASAP Chapter awards were also presented for Excellence in Chapter Innovation and Excellence in Chapter Programs. The awards ceremony is a much-awaited event each year at the annual Summit. “It’s an important part of what we do, and this community should celebrate its successes in the alliance world,” said Michael Leonetti, president and CEO of ASAP, when introducing the finalists. “Every year we get better and better nominations. This year was a really tough judging process,” commented Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP, chair of the 2017 Alliance Excellence Awards committee and founder and CEO of Phoenix Consulting Group, when discussing the selections. A member of the awards committee for 14 years, Watenpaugh led the committee through this year’s selection process. Over the years, “we’ve seen the adoption of best practices, and the quality of alliance management has steadily improved and is reflected in the nominations and submissions we have seen. This year in particular, many of the nominations and key award winners looked at alliances as going beyond simple company-to-company connections. They are networks of stakeholders, customers, industry colleagues, and other industry players. It has become a very complex network of alliances, which is how alliances are evolving. They are becoming more ecosystem-centric.” Of significance this year were the three strong finalists in the corporate responsibility category, whereas last year there were none. “It’s always great to see the contributions companies are making to make the world a better place,” says Watenpaugh. The Individual Alliance Excellence Award is given to a company that has instituted practices, tools, and methodologies in support of successful formation and management for a single alliance. The alliance may be an emerging alliance or comprised of two or more companies. The winner is: Loonaangifteketen-UWV-CBS-Belastingdienst: After this partnership of three government agencies began applying alliance management best practices, it became highly effective in the management of tax revenues in The Netherlands. Belastingdienst (Dutch IRA), UWV (Dutch National Social Security Administration), and CBS (Statistics Netherlands) applied a governance model that emphasized cross-agency collaboration versus agency competition. It resulted in a collaboration that generates 60 percent of the Dutch government’s revenue in an easy-to-use system for pensions and social security benefits. The alliance lowered costs while increasing convenience to the citizenry with 96 percent accuracy. The incorporation of ecosystem thinking helped the collaboration maintain a focus on important initiatives while building relationships across the separate departments. The Innovative Best Alliance Practice Award highlights the use of new, individual alliance management tools or processes that have an immediate and powerful impact on the organization and/or discipline of alliance management. The tools or processes are additions to existing portfolios that address specific elements of alliance management, such as measurement, training, conflict resolution, general communication across the partner ecosystem, or similar facets of the discipline. The winner is: NetApp: While many companies still try to manage partnering processes through spreadsheets, NetApp has invested in technology and governance of its rigorous alliance co-selling program to ensure trackable processes that produce results. The processes engage NetApp and partner representatives proactively in account mapping, account planning, and pipeline management with exemplary execution of the most difficult aspects of go-to-market alliances. They also provide detailed reports on joint co-selling activities. The company is being recognized for the dedicated resources and governance invested in the change. The Alliance Program Excellence Award is presented to a single, specific company and its partnering capability, not an alliance. The company exceeds expectations with its scalable practices, tools, and methodologies to support successful formation and management of alliance portfolios over time. They are able to be applied to multiple alliances, as needed, are repeatable, and have led to consistent alliance performance across multiple alliances. Winners build programs on efficiency, creativity, and an integrated suite of tools, processes, professional development/alliance professional certification, and other elements. The winner is: Equifax: In an industry where partnerships and alliances as a business model are in the beginning stages, Equifax has created internal governance structures that enable management across a highly matrixed enterprise. The program resulted in significant growth in 2015 and 2016, access to new markets, innovation, cost savings by eliminated legal expenses associated with partner disputes, and a change in culture. Equifax now views partnering as critical to success versus a resource of last resort. The Alliances for Corporate Social Responsibility Award is for partnerships that make a profound, measurable, and positive social impact. The principal objective of the alliance is social impact, not profit—although profit, especially if used to fund program expansion, is not discouraged. The winner is: The Synergist-Sanofi: This multiparty alliance comprised of the general public, government and health agencies, industry, and academics and healthcare professionals aims to co-creating solutions to “Break Dengue.” The ecosystem platform, information sharing, and crowd sourcing, with over 1200 member and 2200 Twitter followers, incorporates online chat, worldwide tracking of cases, and toolkits for the public that reduce the risk of infection. The Synergist framework and governance facilitates a neutral platform that encourages participation and enables partners to overcome structural or perceived ethical barriers to collaboration. The platform can be used for other diseases, such as Zika. Two ASAP chapters also received awards. The Excellence in Chapter Innovation award was presented to the RTP Chapter with honorable mention for the Silicon Valley Chapter; the Excellence in Chapter Programs award was presented to the ASAP New England Chapter. About ASAP The Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP) is the only professional association dedicated to elevating and promoting the profession of alliance management, partnerships, and collaboration. Founded in 1998, the organization provides professional development, networking, and resources for cultivating the skills and toolsets needed to manage successful business partnerships. ASAP’s professional certifications include the Certificate of Achievement-Alliance Management (CA-AM) and Certified Strategic Alliance Professional (CSAP). Active global members include Astellas, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Capgemini, Cisco, Citrix, Covance, Eli Lilly and Company, HealthCore, Huawei, IBM, INC Research, Janssen—Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, JDA Software, Merck, Mission Pharmacal, NetApp, Novartis, Plantronics, Sanofi, SAS, Schneider Electric, Takeda, The Warren Company, and Xerox. A complete list of global members is available at http://www.strategic-alliances.org.


News Article | December 12, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP), the world’s leading professional association dedicated to the practice of alliance management, partnering, and business collaboration, announced 10 nominees vying for four annual Alliance Excellence Awards: Individual Alliance Excellence, Innovative Best Alliance Practice, Alliance Program Excellence, and Alliance for Corporate Social Responsibility. The winners will be announced at the upcoming 2017 ASAP Global Alliance Summit, “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Part¬nering Enterprise,” Feb. 28–March 2, at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, California. “These companies have proven track records demonstrating significant leadership value in alliance management,” said Michael Leonetti, president & CEO of ASAP. “Our awards committee reviewed a number of outstanding nominees this year from a range of industries. We selected candidates that were going above and beyond in their practices and can serve as models for the ASAP community. They hail from industries such as consumer credit reporting, audit, tax, and advisory services, IT, utilities, healthcare, consulting, and biopharma, and the projects span the globe, including the Kruger National Park in South Africa,” he added. “I especially appreciate the submissions for Social Corporate Responsibility,” added Norma Watenpaugh, CSAP, chair of the 2017 Alliance Excellence Awards committee and founder/CEO of Phoenix Consulting Group. “We had three worthy finalists for that category this year. It’s always great to see the contributions companies are making to make the world a better place.” Past winners received awards for significant contributions through partnering that increased revenues, provided society with creative business models and problem solving, enhanced products/services/technologies, advanced the profession, etc. Additional value is placed on leadership practices that result in high levels of productivity, effort, achievement, and innovation. Past winners share three key achievements: The Individual Alliance Excellence Award is given to a partnership that has instituted practices, tools, and methodologies in support of successful formation and management for a single alliance. The alliance may be an emerging alliance or comprised of two or more companies. The three finalists are: Bayer-Evotec: This strategic research alliance hopes to identify three small molecule clinical candidates for the treatment of endometriosis. Bayer and Evotec have joint responsibility in early research and preclinical characterization of potential candidates, with Bayer responsible for subsequent clinical development and commercialization. To date the alliance team has delivered five preclinical candidates, exceeding the initial goals of the collaboration. Loonaangifeketen-UWV-CBS- Belastingdienst : After a disastrous start, this unique partnership of three government agencies managing tax revenues in The Netherlands—Belastingdienst (Dutch IRA), UWV (Dutch National Social Security Administration), and CBS (Statistics Netherlands)—became highly effective by applying alliance management best practices, such as development of governance, trust building, and extensive attention to team meetings. National Grid-EnergySage: The alliance provides a marketplace for solar energy to Rhode Island residents by leveraging existing programs that provide an energy efficiency assessment with a solar assessment. The multi-level value creation is designed to meet the state’s carbon reduction goals and create jobs in alternative energy, while providing a one-stop website for all services, and where dozens of local solar installers provide quotes and choices. This year’s Innovative Best Alliance Practice Award will be presented to one of two companies for the use of new alliance management tools or processes that have an immediate and powerful impact on the organization and/or discipline of alliance management. The tools or processes are additions to existing practices that address specific elements of alliance management, such as measurement, training, conflict resolution, general communication across the partner ecosystem, or similar facets of the discipline. The two finalists are: KPMG-UK: This KPMG-powered enterprise branding combines the company’s knowledge of back-office transformation with leading cloud technology providers, such as Oracle, Workday, ServiceNow, and Coupa. The innovation in branding and bundling technology helps accountants easily grasp the business value and significantly increase the win rate in competitive situations. NetApp: While many companies still try to manage partnering processes through spreadsheets, NetApp has invested in technology and governance of its rigorous alliance co-selling program to ensure trackable processes that produce results. The processes engage NetApp and partner representatives proactively in account mapping, account planning, and pipeline management with exemplary execution of the most difficult aspects of go-to-market alliances. The Alliance Program Excellence Award is presented to a single, specific company and its partnering program, not to an alliance. The company exceeds expectations with scalable practices, tools, and methodologies to support successful formation and management of alliance portfolios over time. They are repeatable and have led to consistent alliance performance across multiple alliances. Winners build programs on efficiency, creativity, and an integrated suite of tools, processes, professional development/alliance professional certification, and other elements. The two finalists are: Equifax: Equifax has built an exemplary partnering program in an industry where partnership and alliance business models are still at the budding stages. Internal governance structures enabled management across a highly matrixed enterprise and impacted results on multiple levels, such as revenue, the ability to enter new markets, the launch of new products, and changes to organizational culture. STC Solutions: This highly innovative, consolidated, and centralized alliance and partnership management framework spans different divisions and functional groups throughout the organization and business relationships—from supply side to customer side. The framework develops and promotes an extremely effective corporate-wide collaborative culture that includes supplier, tactical alliances, technology partners, cloud/IoT channel partners, and strategic alliances. The Alliances for Corporate Social Responsibility Award is for partnerships making a profound, measurable, and positive social impact. The principal objective of the alliance is social impact, not profit—although profit, especially if used to fund program expansion, is not discouraged. The three partnering finalists are: Bayer and Drugs for Neglected Diseases Initiative (DNDi): The focus of this alliance is to develop a drug to dramatically reduce treatment time and increase effectiveness for River Blindness, a disease affecting 25 million people in 31 African countries. Current treatments only affect young worms and must be repeated to target adult worms over their 17-year lifespan. Bayer has contracted with non-profit DNDi to provide the new drug at an affordable price for national disease control programs. Dimension Data and Cisco Systems, Inc.: South Africa is home to 70 percent of the remaining rhinos in the world. Cisco Systems and Dimension Data collaborated in the Connected Conservation initiative to apply Internet of Things (IoT) solutions to prevent and reduce the number of rhinos being poached in South Africa’s Kruger National Park. The alliance developed new technology for tracking rhinos without needing to tranquilize them, which can be extremely dangerous to the animals. The technology also creates tight physical security within the preserve to track staff, suppliers, contractors, security, and visitors. The technology and alliance can be replicated to conserve other endangered species. The Synergist-Sanofi: This multiparty alliance incorporates an ecosystem approach to address Dengue fever that includes the general public, government and health agencies, industry, academics, and healthcare professionals aimed at co-creating solutions. “Break Dengue” uses information sharing and crowd sourcing through social media, online chats, case tracking worldwide, and public access to toolkits that reduce risk of infection. The Synergist framework and innovative governance structure provides a systematic approach to manage a diverse ecosystem. The platform is extendible to other diseases, such as Zika. Held Feb. 28-March 2, “Profit, Innovation, and Value for the Partnering Enterprise,” will take place at the San Diego Marriott Mission Valley, San Diego, California, USA. The annual ASAP Global Alliance Summit is the world’s largest gathering of alliance, partnering, and business collaboration professionals. Early Bird discount pricing is available until January 13, 2017. For more information or to register for the 2017 summit, visit http://www.asapweb.org/summit. The Association of Strategic Alliance Professionals (ASAP) is the only professional association dedicated to elevating and promoting the profession of alliance management, partnerships, and collaboration. Founded in 1998, the organization provides professional development, networking, and resources for cultivating the skills and toolsets needed to manage successful business partnerships. ASAP’s professional certifications include the Certificate of Achievement-Alliance Management (CA-AM) and Certified Strategic Alliance Professional (CSAP). Active global members include Astellas, AstraZeneca, Bayer, Capgemini, Cisco, Citrix, Covance, Dell, Eli Lilly and Company, HealthCore, Huawei, IBM, INC Research, Janssen—Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, Merck, Mission Pharmacal, NetApp, Novartis, Plantronics, Sanofi, SAS, Schneider Electric, Takeda, The Warren Company, and Xerox. A complete list of global members is available at http://www.strategic-alliances.org.


Onwuteaka-Philipsen B.D.,VU University Amsterdam | Brinkman-Stoppelenburg A.,Rotterdam University | Gwen C.P.,Statistics Netherlands | De Jong-Krul J.F.,Statistics Netherlands | And 2 more authors.
The Lancet | Year: 2012

Background In 2002, the euthanasia act came into eff ect in the Netherlands, which was followed by a slight decrease in the euthanasia frequency. We assessed frequency and characteristics of euthanasia, physician-assisted suicide, and other end-of-life practices in 2010, and assessed trends since 1990. Methods In 1990, 1995, 2001, 2005, and 2010 we did nationwide studies of a stratifi ed sample from the death registry of Statistics Netherlands, to which all deaths and causes were reported. We mailed questionnaires to physicians attending these deaths (2010: n=8496 deaths). All cases were weighted to adjust for the stratifi cation procedure and for diff erences in response rates in relation to the age, sex, marital status, region of residence, and cause and place of death. Findings In 2010, of all deaths in the Netherlands, 28% (95% CI 25-32; 475 of 6861) were the result of euthanasia. This rate is higher than the 17% (15-18; 294 of 9965) in 2005, but comparable with those in 2001 and 1995. Distribution of sex, age, and diagnosis was stable between 1990 and 2010. In 2010, 77% (3136 of 4050) of all cases of euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide were reported to a review committee (80% [1933 of 2425] in 2005). Ending of life without an explicit patient request in 2010 occurred less often (02%; 95% CI 01-03; 13 of 6861) than in 2005, 2001, 1995, and 1990 (08%; 06-11; 45 of 5197). Continuous deep sedation until death occurred more frequently in 2010 (123% [116-131; 789 of 6861]) than in 2005 (82% [78-86; 521 of 9965]). Of all deaths in 2010, 04% (03-06; 18 of 6861) were the result of the patient's decision to stop eating and drinking to end life; in half of these cases the patient had made a euthanasia request that was not granted. Interpretation Our study provides insight in consequences of regulating euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide within the broader context of end-of-life practices. In the Netherlands the euthanasia law resulted in a relatively transparent practice. Although translating these results to other countries is not straightforward, they can inform the debate on legalisation of assisted dying in other countries.


Edens B.,Statistics Netherlands | Edens B.,VU University Amsterdam | Hein L.,Wageningen University
Ecological Economics | Year: 2013

In spite of an increasing interest in environmental economic accounting, there is still very limited experience with the integration of ecosystem services and ecosystem capital in national accounts. This paper identifies four key methodological challenges in developing ecosystem accounts: the definition of ecosystem services in the context of accounting, their allocation to institutional sectors; the treatment of degradation and rehabilitation, and valuing ecosystem services consistent with SNA principles. We analyze the different perspectives taken on these challenges and present a number of proposals to deal with the challenges in developing ecosystem accounts. These proposals comprise several novel aspects, including (i) presenting an accounting approach that recognizes that most ecosystems are strongly influenced by people and that ecosystem services depend on natural processes as well as human ecosystem management; and, (ii) recording ecosystem services as either contributions of a private land owner or as generated by a sector 'Ecosystems' depending on the type of ecosystem service. We also present a consistent approach for recording degradation, and for applying monetary valuation approaches in the context of accounting. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Schuring M.,Erasmus Medical Center | Robroek S.J.W.,Erasmus Medical Center | Otten F.W.J.,Statistics Netherlands | Arts C.H.,Statistics Netherlands | Burdorf A.,Erasmus Medical Center
Scandinavian Journal of Work, Environment and Health | Year: 2013

Objectives The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ill health and socioeconomic status on labor force exit due to unemployment, early retirement, disability pension, or becoming economically inactive. A secondary objective was to investigate the effect of ill health and socioeconomic status on return to work. Methods A representative sample of the Dutch working population (N=15 152) was selected for a prospective study with ten years follow-up (93 917 person-years). Perceived health and individual and household characteristics were measured at baseline with the Permanent Quality of Life Survey (POLS) during 1999-2002. Statistics Netherlands ascertained employment status monthly from January 1999 to December 2008. Cox proportional hazards analyses were used to determine the factors that predicted labor force exit and return to work. Results Ill health increased the likelihood of labor force exit into unemployment [hazard ratio (HR) 1.89], disability pension (HR 6.39), and early retirement (HR 1.20), but was not a determinant of becoming economically inactive (HR 1.07). Workers with low socioeconomic status were, even after adjusting for ill health, more likely to leave the labor force due to unemployment, disability pension, and economic inactivity. Workers with ill health at baseline were less likely to return to work after unemployment (HR 0.75) or disability pension (HR 0.62). Socioeconomic status did not influence re-employment. Conclusions Ill health is an important determinant for entering and maintaining paid employment. Workers with lower education were at increased risk for health-based selection out of paid employment. Policies to improve labor force participation, especially among low socioeconomic level workers, should protect workers with health problems against exclusion from the labor force.


Van Strien A.J.,Statistics Netherlands | Van Strien A.J.,University of Amsterdam | Soldaat L.L.,Statistics Netherlands | Gregory R.D.,Royal Society for Protection of Birds
Ecological Indicators | Year: 2012

Numerous indicator approaches are found in the scientific literature to describe changes in biodiversity. It is however far from clear which indicators are most appropriate and which are less suitable to summarize trends in biodiversity. One reason for this lack of clarity is that so far the mathematical properties of indicator approaches have had little attention. In this paper, we derive a number of desirable mathematical properties of indicators from economic price-index theory and apply these in the form of tests to 10 metrics to summarize changes in biodiversity. The metrics species richness, Simpson index, Shannon index, Buckland's modified Shannon index and Sørensen's similarity coefficient violate the monotonicity and proportionality test. The percentage of increasing minus declining species also fails the proportionality test, and in the case where trends are assessed relative to the preceding year, this metric also violates the identity test. Most of these indicators are sensitive to spatial scale. The arithmetic and geometric mean of population indices and the mean abundance have better mathematical performance, but the first two are sensitive to appearing and disappearing species in the system surveyed. The metric mean abundance however can only be applied under particular conditions and has some undesirable properties. Unlike the arithmetic mean, the geometric mean is not sensitive to the base year chosen and has the most favourable mathematical properties of the indicators evaluated. The geometric mean can be straightforwardly extended to take into account unequal values of species if desired. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Kulig A.,Statistics Netherlands | Kolfoort H.,Statistics Netherlands | Hoekstra R.,Statistics Netherlands
Ecological Indicators | Year: 2010

This paper provides an overview of the plethora of approaches that are available to measure welfare and sustainable development. Many methods exist but there is no consensus on the 'correct' approach. Furthermore, we also show that the wide variety of sustainable development indictor (SDI) sets which have been adopted also show significant differences. We argue that this is mostly because many of these studies do not use a theoretical approach. We argue that the 'capital approach', which is used in the sustainability debate, is the most promising method to enhance international harmonization. Support is mounting in the scientific, policy and statistical communities for this approach in which economic capital, human capital, natural capital and social capital are distinguished. Many applications of this method express these capital stocks in monetary units (the 'monetary capital approach'). This paper argues that the 'hybrid capital approach', in which the capital stocks can also be measured in non-monetary units, is probably more likely to achieve consensus over a large number of countries and institutes. Also a number of challenges remain for the capital approach. We argue that ideally the indicators should be based on satellite accounts of the national accounting framework. Also the capital approach could be further expanded to current welfare, progress of societies, inequality, and the international dimension of sustainability. We conclude that if the hybrid capital approach is adopted it may become easier to make consistent, theoretically sound and policy relevant comparisons between countries. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Tennekes M.,Statistics Netherlands | De Jonge E.,Statistics Netherlands
IEEE Transactions on Visualization and Computer Graphics | Year: 2014

(Chemical Equation Presented) We present a method to map tree structures to colors from the Hue-Chroma-Luminance color model, which is known for its well balanced perceptual properties. The Tree Colors method can be tuned with several parameters, whose effect on the resulting color schemes is discussed in detail. We provide a free and open source implementation with sensible parameter defaults. Categorical data are very common in statistical graphics, and often these categories form a classification tree. We evaluate applying Tree Colors to tree structured data with a survey on a large group of users from a national statistical institute. Our user study suggests that Tree Colors are useful, not only for improving node-link diagrams, but also for unveiling tree structure in non-hierarchical visualizations. © 2014 IEEE.


Kramer D.,University of Amsterdam | Maas J.,VU University Amsterdam | Wingen M.,Statistics Netherlands | Kunst A.E.,University of Amsterdam
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity | Year: 2013

Background: Several neighbourhood elements have been found to be related to leisure-time walking and cycling. However, the association with neighbourhood safety remains unclear. This study aimed to assess the association of neighbourhood-level safety with leisure-time walking and cycling among Dutch adults.Methods: Data were derived from the national health survey (POLS) 2006-2009, with valid data on 20046 respondents residing in 2127 neighbourhoods. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to examine the association between neighbourhood-level safety (general safety and specific safety components: physical disorder, social disorder, crime-related fear, traffic safety) and residents' engagement in outdoor leisure-time walking and cycling for at least 30 minutes per week.Results: An increase in neighbourhood safety (both general safety and each of the safety components) was significantly associated with an increase in leisure-time cycling participation. Associations were strongest for general safety and among older women. In the general population, neighbourhood safety was not significantly associated with leisure-time walking. However, among younger and older adult men and lower educated individuals, an increase in general safety was associated with a decrease in leisure-time walking participation.Conclusions: In the Netherlands, neighbourhood safety appears to be related to leisure-time cycling but not to walking. Leisure-time cycling may best be encouraged by improving different safety components at once, rather than focusing on one safety aspect such as traffic safety. Special attention is needed for older women. © 2013 Kramer et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

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