States of Jersey

Jersey City, United States

States of Jersey

Jersey City, United States
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News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

LONDON, April 25, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Waterman Group is delighted to celebrate the completion of the first building at the International Finance Centre in Jersey - IFC 1. The development by the States of Jersey Development Company, designed by MJP Architects and Richard MacCormac, is...


Drewett J.,Concrete Repairs Ltd. | Davies K.,CorroCiv Ltd | Armstrong K.,States of Jersey
Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Concrete Repair, Rehabilitation and Retrofitting, ICCRRR 2015 | Year: 2016

The ICCP systems have performed very well in harsh marine environments. The earlier control and monitoring units have become obsolete and were replaced but this is only to be expected with the rapid development of micro-processor based operating systems. The variety of anode systems used have, in the majority of cases, worked well. A few anodes have needed to be replaced but there have been no whole system failures and there is every indication with the low voltage and currents required to achieve corrosion protection to the steel that these anodes will continue to operate for many years with minimal maintenance. The reference electrodes have had some failures (<3%) but on the whole have performed well over the last 17 years. The initial investment in ICCP systems, targeted at specific corrosion problem areas has reduced the long term costs of managing these structures and has extended the effective service life and residual value. With regular monitoring and maintenance the systems should continue to provide corrosion protection for many more years. © 2016 Taylor & Francis Group, London.


Shrives J.P.,States of Jersey | Shrives J.P.,California State University, Channel Islands | Pickup S.E.,States of Jersey | Pickup S.E.,California State University, Channel Islands | And 3 more authors.
Fisheries Research | Year: 2015

The exploitation of the common whelk (. Buccinum undatum L.) has become an integral part of commercial fisheries in both Jersey and French waters. Since 2004 declining catches have been reported, and it has been suggested that existing management measures may not be effective. This study reports a further 8 years of annual monitoring of whelk catches from 2003 to 2011, using identical methodology and analysis as previous work. Jersey commercial whelk fishermen's logbook returns from 2007 to 2011, were also analysed for changes in effort and catch. Average catch per unit effort (CPUE) dropped by 36.7% from 3.3. kg per pot to 2.09. kg per pot. Since 2007, Fishermen's reported landings per unit effort for whelks, also dropped from 2.12. kg per pot to 1.75. kg per pot. Whilst a decline in catch rates of whelks greater than 44. mm shell length was reported earlier, this study also found catch rates for smaller whelks (<44. mm shell length) had declined by 54.5% from 0.44. kg per pot to 0.2. kg per pot, suggesting the start of possible recruitment overfishing. We found no statistical significance (repeated measures ANOVA) between the sample station grouping of 'fished' and 'non-fished', as reported previously, for either the small fraction or large fraction of the catch, both of which showed declines in CPUE. Analysis of fishermen's logbook returns showed that effort had varied over time and between statistical reporting areas. It is suggested that, given changes in fishing effort, an earlier grouping of fishing intensity is no longer relevant and we discuss the pitfalls of using such classifications and other arbitrary boundaries for spatial analyses which are then relied upon in making spatial planning and fisheries management decisions. More detailed spatial observations on fishing effort and trans-national sharing of data, along with relevant choices in joint management measures are required for the future sustainability of local whelk stocks. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Ellis J.R.,CEFAS - Center for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science | Morel G.,States of Jersey | Burt G.,CEFAS - Center for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science | Bossy S.,States of Jersey
Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom | Year: 2011

The most frequently caught skate species around Jersey include blonde ray Raja brachyura, undulate ray Raja undulata, small-eyed ray Raja microocellata and thornback ray Raja clavata. Between September 2006 and December 2008, a total of 814 individuals were tagged and released, of which 64% were small-eyed ray, 22.6% blonde ray and 12.4% undulate ray. The size distribution, sex-ratio and maturity of these samples are summarized. There were 138 reported recaptures (return rate = 17.1%), with most fish recaptured from the study area. Indeed, many of the tagged skates were recaptured within the same release area or within 20 km, indicating high site fidelity, with the longest distance travelled only 61 km. Thirteen fish were recaptured on multiple (2-4) occasions. To date the longest time at liberty has been 754 days. These results are discussed in relation to our current knowledge of the stock structure and exploitation of skates in the western English Channel. © Copyright Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom 2010.


Simpson S.,University of Kent | Blampied N.,JSPCA Animals Shelter | Peniche G.,UK Institute of Zoology | Dozieres A.,CNRS Science Conservation Center | And 4 more authors.
Ecology and Evolution | Year: 2013

Wildlife populations have been introduced to new areas by people for centuries, but this human-mediated movement can disrupt natural patterns of genetic structure by altering patterns of gene flow. Insular populations are particularly prone to these influences due to limited opportunities for natural dispersal onto islands. Consequently, understanding how genetic patterns develop in island populations is important, particularly given that islands are frequently havens for protected wildlife. We examined the evolutionary origins and extent of genetic structure within the introduced island population of red squirrels (Sciurus vulgaris) on the Channel Island of Jersey using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequence and nuclear microsatellite genotypes. Our findings reveal two different genetic origins and a genetic architecture reflective of the introductions 120 years ago. Genetic structure is marked within the maternally inherited mtDNA, indicating slow dispersal of female squirrels. However, nuclear markers detected only weak genetic structure, indicating substantially greater male dispersal. Data from both mitochondrial and nuclear markers support historic records that squirrels from England were introduced to the west of the island and those from mainland Europe to the east. Although some level of dispersal and introgression across the island between the two introductions is evident, there has not yet been sufficient gene flow to erase this historic genetic "footprint." We also investigated if inbreeding has contributed to high observed levels of disease, but found no association. Genetic footprints of introductions can persist for considerable periods of time and beyond traditional timeframes of wildlife management. © 2013 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.


Robins N.S.,British Geological Survey | Rose E.P.F.,Royal Holloway, University of London | Cheney C.S.,States of Jersey
Geological Society Special Publication | Year: 2012

The islands of Jersey, Guernsey, Alderney and Sark lie close to the Normandy coast of France. They expose a largely Precambrian crystalline basement of metamorphic and igneous rocks - Jersey and Alderney also expose some early Palaeozoic clastic sediments - and all have a thin but widespread Quaternary sedimentary cover. The three largest islands were progressively fortified by the British between the early 13th and mid-19th centuries, and by German forces during occupation in World War II, a legacy illustrated by the castles, forts and numerous German coastal fortifications that still adorn them. A German military geologist based on Jersey from mid-1941 to mid-1944, and a military geological team on Guernsey and Alderney during 1942, generated hydrogeological maps and reports that were then in advance of understanding of crystalline basement aquifers elsewhere in the British Isles. All the major documents have now been found in Germany, the USA and UK, although none survived on the islands themselves. Geological mapping and hydrogeological studies postwar under the auspices of the British Geological Survey were completed without access to German data. However, German and British data together now facilitate an appraisal of the heavily stressed aquifers on these small, hard-rock islands over an unusually long (65 year) timespan. © The Geological Society of London 2012.


Michaelides S.,University of Oxford | Cornish N.,States of Jersey | Cornish N.,California State University, Channel Islands | Griffiths R.,University of Kent | And 8 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2015

Populations at range limits are often characterized by lower genetic diversity, increased genetic isolation and differentiation relative to populations at the core of geographical ranges. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that populations situated at range limits might be the result of human introductions rather than natural dispersal. It is therefore important to document the origin and genetic diversity of marginal populations to establish conservation priorities. In this study, we investigate the phylogeography and genetic structure of peripheral populations of the common European wall lizard, Podarcis muralis, on Jersey (Channel Islands, UK) and in the Chausey archipelago. We sequenced a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in 200 individuals of P. muralis to infer the phylogeography of the island populations using Bayesian approaches. We also genotyped 484 individuals from 21 populations at 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci to evaluate the genetic structure and diversity of island and mainland (Western France) populations. We detected four unique haplotypes in the island populations that formed a sub-clade within the Western France clade. There was a significant reduction in genetic diversity (HO, HE and AR) of the island populations in relation to the mainland. The small fragmented island populations at the northern range margin of the common wall lizard distribution are most likely native, with genetic differentiation reflecting isolation following sea level increase approximately 7000 BP. Genetic diversity is lower on islands than in marginal populations on the mainland, potentially as a result of early founder effects or long-term isolation. The combination of restriction to specific localities and an inability to expand their range into adjacent suitable locations might make the island populations more vulnerable to extinction. © 2015 PLOS ONE.


Morel G.M.,States of Jersey | Shrives J.,States of Jersey | Bossy S.F.,States of Jersey | Meyer C.G.,Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology
Journal of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom | Year: 2013

We monitored the long-term residency of reef-associated ballan wrasse and sand-dwelling rays captured at the site of a potential future Marine Protected Area (MPA: Portelet Bay, Jersey) by implanting them with small transmitters and deploying underwater receivers inside the bay. Individual fish were detected at Portelet Bay for up to 618 days, but there were species-specific differences in residency and detection patterns. Ballan wrasse were year-round residents at the study site where they exhibited distinct, rhythmic, diel, tidal and seasonal patterns of behaviour, whereas rays were occasional visitors to Portelet Bay with no discernible pattern to their visits. Results indicate relatively small MPAs (<0.5 km2) that with suitable habitat could provide effective, long-term protection for ballan wrasse, but would likely be of little conservation benefit for rays. Our findings emphasize the importance of quantifying fish movements when planning MPAs which intend to protect multi-species assemblages of coastal fishes. © 2012 Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom.


PubMed | States of Jersey, University of Tasmania, University of Kent, Lund University and 3 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Populations at range limits are often characterized by lower genetic diversity, increased genetic isolation and differentiation relative to populations at the core of geographical ranges. Furthermore, it is increasingly recognized that populations situated at range limits might be the result of human introductions rather than natural dispersal. It is therefore important to document the origin and genetic diversity of marginal populations to establish conservation priorities. In this study, we investigate the phylogeography and genetic structure of peripheral populations of the common European wall lizard, Podarcis muralis, on Jersey (Channel Islands, UK) and in the Chausey archipelago. We sequenced a fragment of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene in 200 individuals of P. muralis to infer the phylogeography of the island populations using Bayesian approaches. We also genotyped 484 individuals from 21 populations at 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci to evaluate the genetic structure and diversity of island and mainland (Western France) populations. We detected four unique haplotypes in the island populations that formed a sub-clade within the Western France clade. There was a significant reduction in genetic diversity (HO, HE and AR) of the island populations in relation to the mainland. The small fragmented island populations at the northern range margin of the common wall lizard distribution are most likely native, with genetic differentiation reflecting isolation following sea level increase approximately 7000 BP. Genetic diversity is lower on islands than in marginal populations on the mainland, potentially as a result of early founder effects or long-term isolation. The combination of restriction to specific localities and an inability to expand their range into adjacent suitable locations might make the island populations more vulnerable to extinction.

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