State Research Center for Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology

Moscow region, Russia

State Research Center for Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology

Moscow region, Russia
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PubMed | Gabrichevsky Moscow Research Institute for Epidemiology and Microbiology, Bphage LLC ; Moscow, State Research Center for Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology and Applied Research LLC
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Bacteriophage | Year: 2015

Travelers diarrhea (TD) is caused by Escherichia coli in 30% of cases. We have developed a phage cocktail for prophylaxis of TD caused by E.coli, Shigella flexneri, Shigella sonnei, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes or Staphylococcus aureus, and investigated its effectiveness against infection caused by the non-pathogenic Lac (-) strain of E.coli K12 C600 in animal and human trials. On the 6thday of both animal and human trials E. coli K12 C600 strain was detected in titer of 10


PubMed | State Research Center for Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Virus research | Year: 2011

Application of bacteriophages and their lytic enzymes to control Clostridium perfringens is one potential approach to reduce the pathogen on poultry farms and in poultry-processing facilities. Bacteriophages lytic for C. perfringens were isolated from sewage, feces and broiler intestinal contents and CPV1, a virulent bacteriophage, was classified in the family Podoviridae. The purified virus had an icosahedral head and collar of approximately 42nm and 23nm in diameter, respectively, with a structurally complex tail of 37nm lengthwise and a basal plate of 30nm. The CPV1 double-stranded DNA genome was 16,747 base pairs with a GC composition of 30.5%. Twenty-two open reading frames (ORFs) coding for putative peptides containing 30 or more amino acid residues were identified and analyzed in the genome. Amino acid sequences of the predicted proteins from the CPV1 genome ORFs were compared with those from the NCBI database and potential functions of 12 proteins were predicted by sequence homology. Three putative proteins were similar to hypothetical proteins with unknown functions, whereas seven proteins did not have similarity with any known bacteriophage or bacterial proteins. Identified ORFs formed at least four genomic clusters that accounted for predicted proteins involved with replication of the viral DNA, its folding, production of structural components and lytic properties. One bacteriophage genome encoded lysin was predicted to share homology with N-acetylmuramoyl-l-alanine amidases and a second structural lysin was predicted to be a lysozyme-endopeptidase. These enzymes digest peptidoglycan of the bacterial cell wall and could be considered potential therapeutics to control C. perfringens.


PubMed | State Research Center for Applied Microbiology & Biotechnology
Type: Journal Article | Journal: FEMS microbiology letters | Year: 2012

Acinetobacter baumannii plays a significant role in infecting patients admitted to hospitals. Many A. baumannii infections, including ventilation-associated pneumonia, wound, and bloodstream infections, are common for intensive care and burn units. The ability of the microorganism to acquire resistance to many antibiotics, disinfectants, and dehydration assures its long-term survival in hospital settings. The application of bacteriophages is a potential tool to control A. baumannii infections. Bacteriophage AP22 lytic for A. baumannii was isolated from clinical materials and classified as a member of the Myoviridae family. The phage had an icosahedral head of 64 nm in diameter and a contractile tail of 85-90 nm in length. According to restriction analysis, AP22 had 46-kb double-stranded DNA genome. The phage AP22 exhibited rapid adsorption (> 99% adsorbed in 5 min), a large burst size (240 PFU per cell), and stability to the wide range of pH. The bacteriophage was shown to specifically infect and lyse 68% (89 of 130) genotype-varying multidrug-resistant clinical A. baumannii strains by forming clear zones. Thus, it could be used as a candidate for making up phage cocktails to control A. baumannii-associated nosocomial infections.

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