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Wang D.,State Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Environment | Wang D.,Chinese Academy of Forestry | Wang B.,State Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Environment | Wang B.,Chinese Academy of Forestry | And 2 more authors.
Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research | Year: 2014

Carbon sequestration is important in studying global carbon cycle and budget. Here, we used the National Forest Resource Inventory data for China collected from 2004 to 2008 and forest biomass and soil carbon storage data obtained from direct field measurements to estimate carbon (C) sequestration rate and benefit keeping C out of the atmosphere in forest ecosystems and their spatial distributions. Between 2004 and 2008, forests sequestered on average 0.36 Pg C yr-1 (1 Pg = 1015g), with 0.30 Pg C yr-1 in vegetation and 0.06 Pg C yr-1 in 0-1 meter soil. Under the different forest categories, total C sequestration rate ranged from 0.02 in bamboo forest to 0.11 Pg C yr-1 in broadleaf forest. The southwest region had highest C sequestration rate, 30% of total C sequestration, followed by the northeast and south central regions. The C sequestration in the forest ecosystem could offset about 21% of the annual C emissions in China over the same period, especially in provinces of Tibet, Guangxi, and Yunnan, and the benefit was similar to most Annex I countries. These results show that forests play an important role in reducing the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide in China, and forest C sequestration are closely related to forest area, tree species composition, and site conditions. © 2013 Taylor & Francis. Source


Wang B.,State Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Environment | Wang B.,Chinese Academy of Forestry | Wang D.,State Key Laboratory of Forest Ecology and Environment | Wang D.,Chinese Academy of Forestry | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Food, Agriculture and Environment | Year: 2013

With the threat of projected climate change, estimating the changes in carbon sequestration is important to enhancing sinks for carbon sequestration to mitigate the climate change. Here, we used a field measurement data of biomass and soil carbon sequestration and a 15-year national forest resource inventory data in China to estimate changes in the carbon storage of biomass and soil between 1994 and 2008. Our results suggested that in the past when the nation was forested by 16.6% the carbon sequestration would have been approximately 263.5 Tg C yr-1. By 1999 forest cover had been increased by 1.6%, and in addition many forests had been planted resulting in a large increase in the total carbon sequestration. From 1994 to 2003, the mean plantation rate was 0.7 M ha yr-1, and by 2008 total carbon sequestration had been increased to 358.7 Tg C yr-1. During the next 40 years, if plantations only expand by presently annual growth, the carbon sequestration of China will increase to 392.4 Tg C yr-1 in 2050. This would reflect a rise of 33.7 Tg C yr-1 between 2008 and 2050, or an annual rise of 0.8 Tg C yr-1, suggesting that carbon sequestration through forest management practices could help offset industrial carbon dioxide emissions. Alternatively, if plantations expand according to the projected forest area, carbon sequestration of the nation would increase to 445.0 Tg C yr-1 in 2050. Under this scenario, the growth of existing forests and the expansion of new forests would result in a net sequestration of 2.05 Tg C yr-1. This study demonstrated that the uncertainty of biomass estimates can be greatly reduced if detailed field measurement analyses were combined with forest inventory data, and slight changes in future forest resource practices could have large implications for carbon fluxes. Source

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