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Herdmann A.,FBN Research Institute for the Biology of Farm Animals | Nuernberg K.,FBN Research Institute for the Biology of Farm Animals | Martin J.,State Institute for Agriculture and Fishing Research | Nuernberg G.,FBN Research Institute for the Biology of Farm Animals | Doran O.,University of the West of England
Animal | Year: 2010

This study investigated the effects of dietary linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) v. linoleic acid (C18:2n-6) on fatty acid composition and protein expression of key lipogenic enzymes, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) and delta 6 desaturase (6d) in longissimus muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue of bulls. Supplementation of the diet with C18:3n-3 was accompanied by an increased level of n-3 fatty acids in muscle which resulted in decrease of n-6/n-3 ratio. The diet enriched with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) significantly inhibited SCD protein expression in muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue, and reduced the 6d expression in muscle. There was no significant effect of the diet on ACC protein expression. Inhibition of the 6d expression was associated with a decrease in n-6 PUFA level in muscles, whereas repression of SCD protein was related to a lower oleic acid (C18:1 cis-9) content in the adipose tissue. Expression of ACC, SCD and 6d proteins was found to be relatively higher in subcutaneous adipose tissue when compared with longissimus muscle. It is suggested that dietary manipulation of fatty acid composition in ruminants is mediated, at least partially, through the regulation of lipogenic enzymes expression and that regulation of the bovine lipogenic enzymes expression is tissue specific. © 2010 The Animal Consortium.


Angulo J.,University of Antioquia | Hiller B.,Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology | Olivera M.,University of Antioquia | Mahecha L.,University of Antioquia | And 4 more authors.
Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture | Year: 2012

Background: The present study investigated tissue-specific responses of muscle and mammary gland to a 10 week intervention of German Holstein cows (n = 18) with three different dietary fat supplements (saturated fat; linseed oil or sunflower oil plus docosahexaenoic acid-rich algae) by analysing fatty acid profiles and quality parameters of meat and milk. Results: Plant oil/algae intervention affected neither fat content nor quality parameters of meat but decreased fat content and saturated fatty acid amounts of milk. Linseed oil/algae intervention caused significantly higher concentrations of C18:3n-3 (meat, 1.0 g per 100 g; milk, 1.2 g per 100 g) and C22:6n-3 (meat, 0.3 g per 100 g; milk, 0.14 g per 100 g). Sunflower oil/algae intervention increased n-6 fatty acid contents in milk (4.0 g per 100 g) but not in meat. Elevated amounts of C18:1trans isomers and C18:1trans-11 were found in meat and especially in milk of plant oil/algae-fed cows. C18:1cis-9 amounts were found to be increased in milk but decreased in meat after plant oil/algae intervention. Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that dietary fatty acid manipulation substantially shifted the fatty acid profiles of milk and to a lesser extent of meat, whereas meat quality traits were not affected. Indications of tissue-specific responses of mammary gland and muscle were identified. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.


Herdmann A.,Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology | Martin J.,State Institute for Agriculture and Fishing Research | Nuernberg G.,Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology | Wegner J.,Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology | And 2 more authors.
Meat Science | Year: 2010

This study investigated the effect of n-6 (control group) and n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) supply (treatment group unrestricted) and a short-time feed restriction for n-3 PUFA supply (treatment group restricted) on intramuscular fat content and the total fatty acid composition in different tissues (muscle, subcutaneous fat, liver, serum and erythrocytes) and lipid classes of intramuscular fat of German Simmental bulls (n. = 25). Exogenous n-3 PUFA caused a higher concentration of the sum of all single n-3 and n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC PUFA) in all analysed tissues. Feed restriction compared to control feeding induced a significant decrease of C18:1 cis-9 in the phospholipid fraction of longissimus muscle and in subcutaneous fat. The concentration of C18:3 n-3 in liver of treatment groups was between 34 and 44% higher compared to control. PUFA in serum and the sum of n-3 PUFA in erythrocytes were significantly higher in both treatment groups compared to control. The synthesis and deposition of n-3 LC PUFA seems to be tissue dependent according to different relative amounts. © 2010 The American Meat Science Association.


Herdmann A.,Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology | Martin J.,State Institute for Agriculture and Fishing Research | Nuernberg G.,Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology | Dannenberger D.,Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology | Nuernberg K.,Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2010

The present study investigated the effects of dietary linolenic acid (ALA) versus linoleic acid (LA) on meat quality, fatty acid composition, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD) activity in longissimus muscle (MLD) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) of German Holstein bulls and the transfer of beneficial n-3 fatty acids into German corned beef sausages (GCB). Feeding LA- and ALA-enriched diets increased essential fatty acids in MLD and SAT. The ALA-supplemented diet decreased significantly the SCD activity in MLD and SAT, resulting in a reduced relative concentration of oleic acid in muscle. The relative proportion of CLAcis-9,trans-11 analyzed by HPLC was not different between groups in either tissue. GCB were produced by using the lean meat of bulls. Beef products of bulls fed the ALA-supplemented diet were rich in ALA and n-3 LC PUFA. Most importantly, there was no loss of n-3 fatty acids during processing under production conditions. Conclusively, the n-6/n-3 fatty acid ratio was beneficially low. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

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