State Health Resource Center

Chhattishgarh, India

State Health Resource Center

Chhattishgarh, India
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PubMed | State Health Resource Center, Indian Institute of Public Health Delhi, Research Triangle Institute Global Pvt. Ltd, Center for Chronic Conditions and Injuries and Honorary Secretary
Type: | Journal: Breast cancer : basic and clinical research | Year: 2016

Globally, breast cancer (BC) has become the leading cause of mortality in women. Awareness and early detection can curb the growing burden of BC and are the first step in the battle against BC. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the awareness and perceived barriers concerning the early detection of BC.A total of 20 focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted during May 2013-March 2014. Pre-existing themes were used to conduct FGDs; each FGD group consisted of an average of ~10 women (aged 18-70 years) who came to participate in a BC awareness workshop. All FGDs were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were inductively analyzed using ATLAS.ti. Based on emerged codes and categories, thematic analysis was done, and theory was developed using the grounded theory approach.Data were analyzed in three major themes: i) knowledge and perception about BC; ii) barriers faced by women in the early presentation of BC; and iii) healthcare-seeking behavior. The findings revealed that shyness, fear, and posteriority were the major behavioral barriers in the early presentation of BC. Erroneously, pain was considered as an initial symptom of BC by most women. Financial constraint was also mentioned as a cause for delay in accessing treatment. Social stigma that breast problems reflect bad character of women also contributed in hiding BC symptoms.Lack of BC awareness was prevalent, especially in low socioeconomic class. Womens ambivalence in prioritizing their own health and social and behavioral hurdles should be addressed by BC awareness campaigns appropriately suited for various levels of social class.


Mohanan P.,Manipal University India | Swain S.,Indian Institute of Public Health | Sanah N.,District Surveillance Unit | Sharma V.,State Health Resource Center | Ghosh D.,JHPIEGO
Sultan Qaboos University Medical Journal | Year: 2014

Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of alcohol consumption, tobacco use and risky sexual behaviour among adolescents, and to evaluate the socioeconomic factors potentially influencing these behaviours. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted from January to April 2011 among 376 adolescents (15-19 years old) studying in different schools and colleges in Udupi, India. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey questionnaire and guidelines were followed for data collection. Participants' alcohol consumption, smoking habits and sexual behaviour patterns were explored. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate logistic regression was done. Results: The prevalence of alcohol consumption, tobacco use and sexual activity was found to occur in 5.7%, 7.2% and 5.5% of participants, respectively. The mean age of the participants' first sexual activity, consumption of alcohol and tobacco use was reported to be approximately 16.8 years. Multivariate analysis showed that males were more likely to have used alcohol and tobacco. Other factors, such as religion and tobacco use among family members, were found to be influential. Conclusion: The potential coexistence of multiple risk behaviours in a student demands an integrated approach. Emphasis should be placed on health education in schools and an increased awareness among parents in order to prevent adolescents' behaviours from becoming a risk to their health.


PubMed | State Health Resource Center, Manipal University India, District Surveillance Unit, JHPIEGO and Indian Institute of Public Health
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Sultan Qaboos University medical journal | Year: 2014

The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of alcohol consumption, tobacco use and risky sexual behaviour among adolescents, and to evaluate the socioeconomic factors potentially influencing these behaviours.This cross-sectional study was conducted from January to April 2011 among 376 adolescents (15-19 years old) studying in different schools and colleges in Udupi, India. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey questionnaire and guidelines were followed for data collection. Participants alcohol consumption, smoking habits and sexual behaviour patterns were explored. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate logistic regression was done.The prevalence of alcohol consumption, tobacco use and sexual activity was found to occur in 5.7%, 7.2% and 5.5% of participants, respectively. The mean age of the participants first sexual activity, consumption of alcohol and tobacco use was reported to be approximately 16.8 years. Multivariate analysis showed that males were more likely to have used alcohol and tobacco. Other factors, such as religion and tobacco use among family members, were found to be influential.The potential coexistence of multiple risk behaviours in a student demands an integrated approach. Emphasis should be placed on health education in schools and an increased awareness among parents in order to prevent adolescents behaviours from becoming a risk to their health.


Swain S.,Indian Institute of Technology Bhubaneswar | Mohanan P.,Manipal University India | Sanah N.,Integrated Disease Surveillance Project | Sharma V.,State Health Resource Center | Ghosh D.,JHPIEGO
International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health | Year: 2014

Background: Adolescence is a crucial stage of life. The development and practice of various risk behaviors predisposes the risk of getting injured and consequences in later life. Study methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 381 adolescents (15-19 years) studying in different schools and colleges of Udupi. The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS), Center for Disease Control (CDC) Questionnaire and the Atlanta Questionnaire and Guidelines was adopted for data collection. Behaviors such as poor obeying traffic rules while driving, violence at school premises, and suicidal thoughts of the participants were explored. Univariate analysis followed by multivariate logistic regression was done to estimate the predictors of violence-related behavior using the Statistical Packages for Social Sciences (SPSS) v. 20. Results: In our study, 27.03% of students (total=381) had knowledge of traffic rules in detail, where 65% drove a motorized vehicle. Nearly 75% of students did not use a helmet or seatbelt while driving and 17% used a mobile phone for either talking or texting while driving. Considering all violence risk behaviors, 33.07% of students had at least and 18% had at least two violence-related risk behaviors. Nearly 21.78% thought of hitting somebody, 16.34% of boys and 9.5% of girls carried sharp objects to school, 18.81% of boys and 10.39% of girls damaged or stole other students' property, 18.37% bullied others in the past month at the school campus, and 11.32% were involved in serious fights. Out of 381 students, 114 (30.32%) were bullied, 10% had been slapped intentionally, and 18% of girls felt unsafe to go out of their home because of threat compared with 15% of boys. In total, 71 (18.93%) students thought of suicide and 22 of them attempted it. Logistic regression showed that boys [odds ratio (OR): 1.72, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02-2.93) and students of 16 years of age (OR: 3.02, 95% CI: 1.06-9.02) affected or victimized by violent activities at school (OR: 3.23, 95% CI: 1.76-5.93) and bullied by others (OR: 2.6, 95% CI: 1.55-4.36) were determining factors for violence-related behaviors after adjusting for other variables. Conclusion: There is a need to identify students at risk and for intervention addressing the risk factors. © 2015, WDG. All rights reserved.


Prakash B.,JSS Medical College | Prashantha B.,JSS Medical College | Shraddha K.,State Health Resource Center
Indian Journal of Public Health Research and Development | Year: 2015

Background: The reduction in fertility level, reinforced by steady increase in the life expectancy has produced fundamental changes in the age structure of the population, which in turn leads to the ageing population. Objectives: To know the psycho-social problems of the elderly in urban population of Mysore. To determine the extent of functional impairment among the elderly. To know the psychological distress of the elderly using GHQ score. Material and Method: This community based Cross sectional study was carried out at the field practice area of Urban Health Centre, JSS medical college, Mysore. The study population comprises of all geriatric population aged 60 years or above who were residing in the study area for atleast one year. 526 study subjects were recruited for the study. Data collection was done from May 2011 to December 2011 using a preformed semi-structured schedule. Data was entered into Microsoft excel and Statistical analysis is carried out using SPSS 17 Version. Results: Most of elderly men (78.3%) were more functional than elderly women (75.2%). Severe functional impairment was almost same in both gender (4%) while moderate imparement was noted more among aged women. The functional score was significantly higher for young old, for literates, for middle class and for employed. Anxiety & Insomnia were found in 3.4% of the aged (males 2.4% and females 4.1%) followed by somatic symptoms (2.9%), social dysfunction (1.5%) and severe depression (1.1%). overall psychological distress was more among elderly women. The prevalence of mental illnesses were found to be significantly higher for old old. Conclusions: Awareness among the elderly population should be created for regular medical check-ups to ensure prevention and early detection of the chronic diseases. There is a need to have geriatric wards having specialised professionals with psychiatric and medical social workers along with subsidized health care services. © 2015, Indian Journal of Public Health Research and Development. All rights reserved.

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