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Shan Y.,Northeast Normal University | Jiang Y.,Northeast Normal University | Yin X.,Northeast Normal University | Yin X.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration | Wang Z.,Northeast Normal University
Chinese Journal of Applied and Environmental Biology | Year: 2014

The vegetation recovers gradually after forest cutting, which changes the original plant community composition and the soil ecological environment. In order to understand the effects of cutting on soil fauna communities, we investigated soil fauna community on the clear-cutting and unclear-cutting of Quercus mongolica + Betula davurica forestland and Larix olgensis plantation, respectively, in April and July, 2011. Soil macrofauna was picked out by hands. Soil meso-microfauna were extracted by Tullgren funnel. All extracted soil samples were identified to the suborder or family level under a stereoscopic microscope. Soil pH was measured with PHS-3B acidity meter. Soil organic C was determined by K2Cr2O7 oxidation method and total N by Kjeldahl method. Total P was analyzed by using the colorimetrie method with molybdenum in sulphuric acid. It showed that the unclear-cutting Quercus mongolica + Betula davurica forestland had higher density (309.5 ind./m2), group number (30) and diversity index (3.13) of soil macrofauna as well as higher density (2.12 × 104 ind./m 2), group number (22) and diversity (2.05) of soil meso-microfauna than the clear-cutting of Quercus mongolica + Betula davurica forestland. But the density, group number and diversity of soil fauna in the clear-cutting Larix olgensis plantation were lower than those in the unclear-cutting counterpart. Soil organic matter, total N (P < 0.05) and pH (P < 0.05) had significantly effect on soil fauna; while total P (P > 0.05) and soil moisture content (P > 0.05) had little effect on soil fauna. The study suggested that cutting has obvious effects on soil fauna community, with the extent of influence depending on the forestland type before cutting. Source


Lu M.-Z.,Northeast Normal University | Lu M.-Z.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration | Sheng L.-X.,Northeast Normal University | Sheng L.-X.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration | Zhang L.,Florida Gulf Coast University
Wetland Science | Year: 2013

The three wetlands with different climatic zones were selected to compare carbon sink/source and impacting factors to carbon source. They are in the Sanjiang Plain, Zoigê Plateau and Guangzhou City located in temperate sub-humid areas, in Eastern Tibetan Plateau and in transition zone of Guangzhou between tropical and subtropical area, respectively. This study found that the carbon sequestration and potential in the mangrove wetlands are higher than those in other 2 wetlands. CH4 and CO2 emissions in the wetlands are varying with different climatic conditions. CO2 emissions from the wetlands in Zoigê Plateau and the wetlands in Sanjiang Plain are higher than the mangrove wetlands in Guangzhou; and CH4 emission in the wetlands in the Sanjiang Plain is greater than the mangrove wetlands in Guangzhou. Wetlands perform as a carbon sink even with different climatic conditions. Climate is a main driver at a large-scale for carbon exchanges for the wetlands, while hydrology, vegetation types and densities also play major roles for wetland carbon exchange. Reclamation of the wetlands impacts carbon pool significantly, because the reclamation reduces soil organic carbon storage in wetlands. Source


Han Y.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration | Han Y.,Northeast Normal University | Qin W.-C.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration | Qin W.-C.,Northeast Normal University | Wang Y.-Q.,University of Rhode Island
Guang Pu Xue Yu Guang Pu Fen Xi/Spectroscopy and Spectral Analysis | Year: 2014

In recent years, the area of saline soil in the west of Jilin Province expands increasingly, and soil quality is becoming more and more worsening, which not only caused great damage to the land resources, but also posed a huge threat to agricultural production and ecological environment. We combined with polarized and hyperspectral information to establish the general model and scientifically validated it. The results show that there is a strong relationship between the saline soil hyperspectral polarized information and its physicochemical property parameters, and with regularity. This paper has important theoretical significance for the mechanism of saline soil surface reflection, recognition and classification of saline soil and background, the utilization of soil polarization sensor and the development of quantitative remote sensing. Source


Liu L.,Northeast Normal University | Liu L.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration | Liu L.,Key Laboratory of Vegetation Ecology of the Ministry of Education | Jie D.,Northeast Normal University | And 19 more authors.
Silicon | Year: 2015

Phragmites communis phytoliths were extracted from the xerophytic habitat of 12 sampling sites in northeast (NE) China during June–October in 2011 and 2012. The changes of P. communis phytolith concentrations in different temperature zones and growth stages were used to reveal the ecological environmental significance of P. communis phytoliths. The purpose of the study is to provide a scientific reference for quantitative reconstruction of paleoenvironment and studies of phytolith formation. The main phytolith types extracted from the 12 sampling sites and different growth stages were identical; however, the phytolith concentrations differed markedly. In NE China, from the temperate to the warm temperate zone, as temperature increased, the saddle phytoliths, bulliform phytoliths and the silicified stomata concentrations all increased, whereas the lanceolate phytolith concentration decreased. Moreover, in the humid, semi-humid and semi-arid areas, there were different responses of P. communis phytolith concentrations to temperature. Consequently, the spatial results showed that P. communis phytolith concentrations in NE China were closely related to temperature, which enabled inference of the change in temperature from phytolith concentration; however, they were also somewhat affected by humidity. During June–October, the temporal variation results of P. communis phytolith concentrations revealed that there were high lanceolate and bulliform phytolith concentrations in September or October; whereas the saddle phytolith concentration was high in July or August, and the maximum concentration for silicified stomata was in July. These findings may improve the understanding of phytolith formation, and provide useful information to further interpret phytolith assemblages in sediments. © 2015 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht Source


Liu L.,Northeast Normal University | Liu L.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration | Jie D.,Northeast Normal University | Jie D.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Wetland Ecology and Vegetation Restoration | And 12 more authors.
Ecological Engineering | Year: 2016

Accuracy of paleovegetation reconstruction and understanding of phytolith formation would both be improved by further study of phytolith size in the Phragmites australis under different environmental conditions. Leaves of P. australis were collected from 11 sampling sites in northeast China with differences in temperature, precipitation and habitat. Principal component analysis of environmental factors (climatic and edaphic) indicated that the annual averages of temperature and precipitation were the main factors influencing phytolith size. Moreover, three-way analyses of variance (ANOVAs) further showed that phytolith size differed significantly under conditions of different temperature or precipitation gradients, whereas habitat differences had little effect. The changes in phytolith size with temperature differed in the humid, semi-humid and semi-arid areas of northeast China. In the humid and semi-humid areas, moving from the temperate to the warm temperate zone, increasing temperature reduced phytolith size; whereas in the semi-arid area, phytolith became larger with increasing temperature. In the warm temperate and temperate zones, the changes of phytolith size with precipitation showed the same trend-moving from the semi-arid to semi-humid to humid areas, as precipitation increased, phytolith grew larger. Finally, ANOVA revealed that phytoliths were also sensitive to habitat. These findings demonstrated that the size of P. australis phytoliths was sensitive to environmental factors: for regional research, the annual averages of temperature and precipitation were the major factors influencing size, but in the same climate district, habitat differences seemed to also have a significant impact on phytolith size. Consequently, phytolith analysis has potential utility in the study of global climate change, palaeoenvironment reconstruction, and environmental conservation and restoration. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.. Source

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