State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment

Shanghai, China

State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment

Shanghai, China
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Zhang W.,East China University of Science and Technology | Zhang W.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment | Lin K.-F.,East China University of Science and Technology | Lin K.-F.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment | And 4 more authors.
Pedosphere | Year: 2013

Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a popular additive of the chemical industry; its effect on activities of important soil enzymes is not well understood. A laboratory incubation experiment was carried out to analyze the PFOA-induced changes in soil urease, catalase, and phosphatase activities. During the entire incubation period, the activities of the three soil enzymes generally declined with increasing PFOA concentration, following certain dose-response relationships. The values of EC10, the contaminant concentration at which the biological activity is inhibited by 10%, of PFOA for the soil enzyme activity calculated from the modeling equation of the respective dose-response curve suggested a sensitivity order of phosphatase > catalase > urease. The effect of PFOA on soil enzyme activities provided a basic understanding of the eco-toxicological effect of PFOA in the environment. Results of this study supported using soil phosphatase as a convenient biomarker for ecological risk assessment of PFOA-polluted soils. © 2013 Soil Science Society of China.


Zhao Y.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment | Lin K.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment
Toxicological and Environmental Chemistry | Year: 2011

Both quantum dots- (QD) and copper- (Cu2+) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The mechanisms underlying oxidative damage of combined QD and Cu were examined. Thus, the antioxidant enzyme glutathione-S-transferase (GST) enzyme activity and its genetic transcription regulator nuclear factor E2 (Nrf2) transcription factor expression was investigated in L02 cells. Addition of 2 μg mL-1 (IC10) QD enhanced Cu2+-induced GST activity and Nrf2 transcription factor levels by 35% and 86%, respectively. QD and Cu increased toxicity was also confirmed by cell morphology changes. The findings that QD- and/or Cu2+-induced toxicity enhanced GST via the Nrf2/antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway indicate that oxidant stress resulted in antioxidant responses being initiated in hepatic cells possibly as an adaptive mechanism. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.


Zhao Y.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment | Lin K.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment | Zhang W.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment | Liu L.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment
Journal of Environmental Sciences | Year: 2010

As a new class of xenogenous nanoparticle, quantum dots (QDs) possess the potential to co-exist with Cu2+ in human liver. The combined toxicity is thus concerned. Considering QDs and Cu2+ are known ROS (reactive oxygen species) inducer, we investigated the combined oxidative stress and corresponding protective strategy using human hepatic L02 cells. The results demonstrated that the presence of a small amount of MPA-CdTe QDs (2 μg/mL) in a Cu2+ solution (2.5-20 μg/mL) resulted in a higher toxicity with up to 8-fold cell viability decrease, which was accompanied by cell morphology changes. The combined toxicity was then confirmed as ROS associated oxidative stress with up to 300% and 35% increase of the intracellular ROS level and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, respectively. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can also provide almost complete protection against the induced toxicity. Therefore, the ROS associated oxidant injury might be responsible for the QDs-Cu2+/Cu2+ induced toxicity and could be balanced through cytoprotective antioxidant enzyme GST. © 2010 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences.


Zhang W.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment | Zhang W.,East China University of Science and Technology | Chen L.,State Environmental Protection Key Laboratory of Environmental Risk Assessment | Chen L.,East China University of Science and Technology | And 4 more authors.
Chemosphere | Year: 2015

Lead (Pb) and decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209) are the main pollutants at e-waste recycling sites (EWRSs). Focus on joint toxicological effects of the two chemicals has increasingly gained a great amount of interest. Therefore, the lab study was performed to determine the Pb mobility and microbial toxicity in a Pb-polluted soil in the presence of BDE209 for the first time. The results showed that BDE209 was barely degraded and could elicit the combined effects with Pb exposure during the entire incubation period. The exchangeable (EXCH) and carbonates fractions of Pb were transformed to organic, Fe/Mn oxides and residual fractions, and the addition of an appropriate amount (100mgkg-1) of BDE209 facilitated the transformation compared with Pb alone. In addition, soil microbial biomass C (Cmic), soil basal respiration (SBR) and metabolic quotient (qCO2) increased in the beginning of the experiment and then declined with the incubation period extension, and BDE209 addition might cause notable different response relative to the control. Significant correlations between EXCH or mobility factor (MF) of Pb and SBR, Cmic, or qCO2 in soil treated with BDE209 can be clearly observed. Results of the observations provide a better understanding of ecotoxicological effects of Pb and BDE209 joint exposure on indigenous microorganisms in soil at EWRSs. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

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