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Yang Y.,State Discipline and State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease | Yang Y.,Nankai University | Wei R.-B.,State Discipline and State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease | Xing Y.,State Discipline and State Key Laboratory of Kidney Disease | And 7 more authors.
Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental | Year: 2013

Objective This study compared the efficacy of angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) and calcium channel blockers (CCBs) in the effect of insulin resistance (IR) as assessed using the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) in non-diabetic patients. Methods The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched to identify studies published before December 2012 that investigated the use of ARBs and CCBs to determine the effect on the HOMA-IR index in non-diabetics. Parameters on IR and blood pressure were collected. Review Manager 5.2 and Stata 12.0 were used to perform the meta-analysis. Fixed and random effects models were applied to various aspects of the meta-analysis, which assessed the therapeutic effects of the two types of drug using the HOMA-IR index in non-diabetic patients. Results The meta-analysis included five clinical trials. Patient comparisons before and after treatment with ARBs and CCBs revealed that ARBs reduced the HOMA-IR index (weighted mean difference (WMD) - 0.65, 95% confidence interval (CI) - 0.93 to - 0.38) and fasting plasma insulin (FPI) (WMD - 2.01, 95% CI - 3.27 to - 0.74) significantly more than CCBs. No significant differences in the therapeutic effects of these two types of drug on blood pressure were observed. Conclusion Given that there are no significant differences in the therapeutic effects of ARBs and CCBs on blood pressure, as ARBs are superior to CCBs in their effect on the HOMA-IR index in non-diabetics, they might be a better choice in hypertension patients without diabetes. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.

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