United States
United States

Stantec Inc. is an international professional services company in the design and consulting industry. Founded in 1954, Stantec provides professional consulting services in planning, engineering, architecture, interior design, landscape architecture, surveying, environmental science, project management, and project economics for infrastructure and facilities projects. The Company provides services on projects around the world through over 15,000 employees operating out of more than 250 locations in North America and 7 locations internationally. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.enr.com

For ENR’s Top 400 Contractors, the construction market is going strong and predictions of a leveling off or even a decline have been premature. While many in the industry now believe the market will remain healthy for the foreseeable future, large contractors in the big-ticket international oil-and-gas and mining markets did take another hit in 2016—although most are weathering that storm. Last year was a strong one for the Top 400, which  generated a record $366.41 billion in contracting revenue, an increase of 6.5% from 2015’s $344.14 billion. However, the real story is on the domestic side. Contracting revenue from U.S. projects rose a healthy 9.7%, to $322.83 billion, on top of a 9.5% rise in domestic revenue last year. On the other hand, non-U.S. contracting revenue plunged 12.5%, to $43.58 billion, in 2016, with the major declines noted in projects in the minerals-and-mining, petroleum and power sectors. Bechtel continued its Top 400 dominance, ranking No. 1 for the 19th consecutive year. However, the oil price slump and the soft minerals-and-mining sector had a significant impact on its markets. Despite this, Bechtel’s contracting revenue was up in 2016. “When the collapse in oil prices happened, people in the petroleum industry expected them to bounce back in a year. It didn’t happen. Now people are wondering if they will ever bounce back to where they were,” says Jack Futcher, named Bechtel chief operating officer last year. It is a different story in the U.S., Futcher says. Cheap feedstock from domestic gas and oil extraction has spurred development of petrochemical facilities and gas-fired power plants. He notes, for example, that Bechtel has designed and will soon break ground on Shell Chemical Appalachia petrochemicals complex, including an ethylene cracker and a polyethylene derivatives unit, near Pittsburgh. The complex will use low-cost ethane from shale gas producers in the Marcellus and Utica basins to produce 1.6 million annual tons of polyethylene. Many contractors in the oil-and-gas sector agree that oil prices will remain depressed as new extraction technologies have allowed more oil and gas reserves to be accessed. “We see oil prices lower for longer, with a slight uptick … to around $55-$60 per barrel,” says Graham Hill, executive vice president of KBR. He also says the center of production has shifted. “The U.S. is becoming the advantage feedstock nation of the world—the ‘new Saudi Arabia’ in downstream and the ‘new Qatar’ in midstream liquefied natural gas.” In the international market, Futcher also notes that low oil prices have propelled oil-producing nations in the Middle East to move away from reliance on oil revenue to maintain their economic strength. Cheap energy prices have spurred some countries in the region to move into aluminum smelting, in which Bechtel has significant construction expertise. Unlike design firms, there is less consolidation among contractors. The few contractor acquisitions of note in the past year include Burns & McDonnell’s buy of Appleton, Wis.-based industrial contractor AZCO Inc. in December. AZCO ranked No. 82 on last year’s ENR Top 600. “We did not have experience in direct-hire contracting that AZCO now provides us with,” says Ray Kowalik, Burns & McDonnell CEO. The biggest move on the Top 400 was the acquisition of U.S.-based MWH Global by Stantec, enabling the Canadian parent’s first appearance on the Top 400. Stantec CEO Bob Gomes says the move was spurred by customer demands for a more integrated approach to construction. It also gives Stantec a greater geographic range in the international market, he says. “AECOM has committed $250 million to help provide project financing through AECOM Capital.” —Dan McQuade, President for construction, AECOM AECOM, another firm known principally for design that broke into the contracting ranks a few years ago with its acquisitions of Tishman Construction, Hunt Construction and URS, now ranks No. 5 on the Top 400. “We are now fully integrated and are able to provide the full package of design-build and design-build-finance delivery,” says Dan McQuade, AECOM construction president. “Last year was one of tremendous growth on the contracting side,” McQuade says. He notes that the AECOM Tishman group is working on or has just completed seven buildings of at least $1 billion in size, and that the Hunt group is working on football stadiums for the Atlanta Falcons and Los Angeles Rams. The firm also won the job to decommission the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station in Pendleton, Calif. A significant development has been the growth of many international firms in the U.S. market to take advantage of growing infrastructure investment. These include Spanish contractors Dragados, OHL and Ferrovial, France’s Colas, Italy’s Salini-Impregilo with its recent acquisition of Connecticut-based Lane Industries and China’s China Construction America, all of which are becoming major U.S. market players. “The competition from these companies is fierce, as they are showing up with big balance sheets,” says Richard Cavallaro, CEO of Skanska USA. “Ten years ago, we were one of the few foreign-owned contractors, but we had been here for decades.” There is a considerable concern among contractors about the ability of clients to obtain financing for projects. The U.S. Federal Reserve has begun raising interest rates at a modest pace, having an impact on the cost of borrowing. Further, banks are becoming a little edgy about how much of their lending portfolios is devoted to real estate. “One of the big reasons for that is that the banks don’t want to start lending when the policy that will dictate the market is still unknown, so it’s tough to get construction loans,” says Jeff Hoopes, CEO of Swinerton. He says banks are looking at other markets and different products to invest in, and that’s impacted business across the board. The reluctance of banks to commit to more real estate lending, particularly in the residential market, has caused developers to seek other means of financing. “Developers across the board tell us they are seeking out second- and third-tier lenders for financing arrangements. The exception appears to be the healthcare sector, which traditionally finances projects internally,” says Scott Thompson, senior vice president of Batson-Cook Co. “While some projects have been delayed because of tightening financing markets, other financial players—including real estate funds established by developers—have stepped up to pick up the slack,” adds Ken Colao, president of CNY Group. Cavallaro says the ability to arrange, or even participate, in project financing is a key to get many jobs off the ground. “Skanska has a major financing group that can help make things happen.” McQuade says that AECOM now is a major player in the move toward contractors assisting, or even contributing to, project financing. “AECOM has committed $250 million to help provide project financing through AECOM Capital.” McQuade says that about $1 billion in current AECOM projects are the result of AECOM Capital either helping to find financing, or actually contributing to the financial package. Donald Trump’s election as president last year has been a key market development, with many industry participants expecting a more pro-business climate, leading to greater opportunities. “In 2016, I thought we were in the late innings of the construction boom, but since November, a lot of people in the industry are more bullish that the market will continue to be strong,” says McQuade. He believes some market energy may be resulting from a lull in the run-up to the election, but he says peers now are more optimistic. However, many contractors are taking a wait-and-see attitude about the new administration, saying it will take from six to 18 months for the full impact of new policies to affect the industry. “I think the Trump effect will manifest itself more clearly in 2018. We have some concerns about immigration and foreign trade policies, as they relate to construction labor and materials pricing,” says Paul D. Little, CEO of Alston Construction. There are signs that pro-growth policies may benefit the industry. Bechtel’s Futcher says cutting corporate taxes may result in repatriating foreign profits of U.S. corporations in the form of capital investments here. And, “if the right policies are enacted, we hope to see an increase in foreign direct investment in the U.S.,” says Stephen Gray, CEO of Gray Construction. Shaun Yancey, president of U.S. operations at PCL Construction Enterprises, sums up the general attitude among contractors: “There is quite a bit of rhetoric around the construction industry, but we are still waiting on the administration. Although there is optimism about the future of our industry, there is quite a bit of uncertainty at this moment.” Many contractors in specific markets see potential headwinds as a result of the election. On the power side, firms in the renewables market want to know what will happen with investment tax credits. “We don’t know if Trump is going to basically eliminate those, and we’re still not sure if they’re going to get phased out in 2023 like they’re set up to, or get shut off next year,” says Hoopes of Swinerton. With some customer reluctance in the market, he is seeing a little bit of a slowdown in the solar market as people wait to see what’s going happen with Trump and his policies. The healthcare market also has suffered over the past few years as construction clients in the sector had to adjust to the impact of the 2010 Affordable Care Act. But several firms see a market pickup. “Right now, we are seeing lots of healthcare projects on the horizon … [mostly] medium-sized renovation and upgrade projects,” says Dan Starr, president of GE Johnson Construction Co. He says this upsurge is a carryover from the last recession when many hospitals held back on improving systems to better understand the Affordable Care Act and its impact on their business. Structure Tone also is benefitting from this uptick. “Our LF Driscoll team has been building healthcare facilities in the Philadelphia area and in New Jersey for decades, and we’ve now extended that expertise into the New York City metropolitan area,” says Bob Mullen, Structure Tone CEO. The markets in the technology and related sectors continue to go full-bore. “We are seeing an even stronger demand than last year from our advanced technology customers, who are building data-center and mission-critical projects to support the insatiable demand for new content,” says Mike Ford, a member of DPR’s management committee. Further, e-commerce is having a major impact on the retail market. Many firms bemoan that the market for retail stores and shopping malls is suffering as more people turn to online buying. On the other hand, “we see the industrial warehouse and distribution market remaining very strong for the near term. Vacancy rates are lower, and rents are slightly higher in most markets,” says Little of Alston Construction. “Similarly we see very healthy conditions in our food and beverage and healthcare segments.” Despite a strong market, many contractors complain that competition continues to be fierce. Some firms say that many contractors fear a decline in the market and are bidding on anything to build backlog to get them through future lean times. This fierce competition has caused margins to stagnate, despite the amount of work available. “It would be assumed that general contractor fees would have risen as firms have become busier, but that’s not necessarily what we’re seeing,” says Dave Bangasser, CEO of Opus Design Build. “Subcontractor margins have rebounded better than those of general contractors.” William H. Goodrich, CEO of LeChase Construction Services, adds that “a number of jobs are being awarded as if construction is purely a commodity—on price alone. But it may be a disservice to all contractors to accept that low bids—to the point of a deficit—are a strategy for being competitive. We have more to offer.” Part of the problem about depressed margins stems from owner expectations in the wake of the industry downturn in 2008. Many general contractors chased work at reduced margins to maintain market share. As a result, many clients became accustomed to lower construction costs. “This effect, coupled with high demand for new construction and the current labor shortage, has led some clients to believe that GCs are simply charging more for their services, when in many cases margins remain compressed,” says Mark Yanik, vice president of Leopardo Cos. Inc. Another recession hangover is the expectation by owners that contractors will accept more burden in contract terms. “A precedent was set in the recession for owners to include [contract clauses such as] no waiver of consequential damages, broad indemnity and other onerous contract terms, and this aggressive stance on contracting has not changed as the market rebounded,” says Tim Steigerwald, Messer Construction Co. senior vice president. Risk-shifting also is a major bone of contention among contractors. “A trend we are seeing more often is owners pushing more risk onto the contractor without the ability to manage those risks as we see fit, and contract terms that are less favorable,” says PCL’s Yancey. This trend has resulted in a rise in insurance premiums and deductibles, an increase in alternate procurement methods and a hike in regulations related to public works, adds Charles J. Montalbano, president of China Construction America-Civil. “The last few years it was a buyer’s market, where owners were able to push a lot of risk down on us, and we are beginning to pay for that,” says Cavallaro of Skanska USA. But he says that contractors in the current market are more willing and able to push back. “We push, they pull, but it won’t be as easy for owners to get everything they want now.” General contractors’ relationship with subcontractors has improved over the years, as the advancement of alternate delivery models for projects has forced both groups to work more as a team. “The days of contractors telling subs ‘Do what I say’ are over,” says McQuade of AECOM. However, in a strong market, contractors have begun to pay more attention both to the stability and the availability of subcontractors. McQuade says subs are getting stretched, and contractors must be clear on the scope of responsibilities of subs to make sure each under­stands what is expected and whether it has the resources and staff to complete the job. “We are in a day and age where information flow is by the second, but decision-making has not kept up. We are just developing technology to provide visual modeling to help customers make their decisions faster.” —Pat A. Di Filippo, Executive Vice President, Turner Construction Pat A. Di Filippo, executive vice president of Turner Construction, says the financial health of subcontractors is paramount to a successful project. “That is why we have instituted a program to pay invoices from subs within a few days of approval, rather than the normal 30-45 days,” he says, adding that this helps subcontractor cash flow and maintains good relations with firms. Subcontractors are the first ones to run into workforce shortages, particularly in the trades. So some contractors are employing new methods of packaging work to make sure subcontractors are able to perform. “We have seen shortages of labor and staff and we simply augment these trades by carving specific areas of work out of their contracts and awarding this work to additional contractors. On occasion, we may have as many as three contractors working on one trade,” says Colao of CNY Group. Shortages also have led to GCs taking a more active role in the construction process. For example, Turner Construction has begun self-performing concrete work in Boston, Seattle and selected markets in Florida, and occasionally drywall as well. “We are not looking to displace subcontractors, but on some jobs there is a need for special expertise that we can supply internally, rather than subbing it out,” says Di Filippo. Some major self-perform contractors have already addressed the problem of staffing. “Each market we are in has a different trajectory, so we have diversified,” says Futcher of Bechtel. He says that all staff use the same tools and processes, regardless of what market they are working in, making it easy for the company to move people from one type of work to another without worrying about retraining staffers in new procedures. “We have a global resource base of engineers, project managers and other professionals to draw on.” The construction industry has always been slow to adopt new methods and technology, but new advancements in design and communications technology have become a must for most large contractors. Building information modeling and communications technology have become the ante for major firms just to get in the game. Many contractors are venturing into new advanced technologies to improve productivity. For example, sensor technology is a relatively new method that is helping advance the speed of construction. “We are using concrete sensors that get tied to the rebar and buried when the concrete is poured, which in turn provides live drying and curing data directly to our superintendents’ phones, enabling us to make more informed decisions on flooring, roofing, schedules and protection from adverse weather conditions,” Mullen of Structure Tone points out. Site logistics modeling also enables contractors to engage owners on safety discussions, showing the swing radius of a tower crane and locations of laydown areas, traffic relocations and entrance protection. “These are the details owners care about beyond construction, and the 3D printed model builds upon what they can see in the virtual model,” says Steigerwald. Steigerwald also notes that subcontractors and craft workers appreciate site logistics modeling because it showcases complicated geometry, uncovers slab and beam details and depicts tie-in complexities that may otherwise be hard to see virtually. According to Steigerwald, “it’s a great tool for conceptualization and spurring strategic conversations and we’re using it in our owner, coordination and subcontractor meetings with great success.” As the Internet of Things makes its way into every industry, it also is gaining a place in design-build. “The idea of tracking each jobsite’s equipment, workers, milestones and more in one place will improve safety and efficiency, as well as potentially impact the bottom line,” says Gray of Gray Construction. While for some contractors, the information flow is a godsend, others worry that data flow isn’t the problem. “We are in a day and age where information flow is by the second, but decision-making has not kept up. We are just developing technology to provide visual modeling to help customers make their decisions faster,” says Di Filippo. Many contractors agree that virtual reality will speed decision-making. “Virtual reality on a couple of our biggest projects has proven to be very helpful for clients, enabling them to make quicker decisions and increasing their revenue potential before construction is completed,” says Leonard W. Martling, CEO of The Weitz Co.


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

NOT FOR DISTRIBUTION TO UNITED STATES NEWSWIRE SERVICES OR FOR DISSEMINATION IN THE UNITED STATES Gowest Gold Ltd. ("Gowest" or the "Corporation") (TSX VENTURE:GWA) announced today that it has closed a non-brokered private placement of 10,423,684 "flow-through" common shares of the Corporation (the "Shares"), at a price of $0.19 per Share, for aggregate gross proceeds of $1,980,500 (the "Offering"). The proceeds derived from the sale of the Shares will be used to fund the exploration work on the Company's North Timmins Gold Project and for general working capital purposes. In connection with the Offering, the Corporation paid $70,000 for finder's fees. Subscriptions by insiders of the Corporation accounted for $230,000 of the gross proceeds of the Offering. Participation by the insiders in the Offering is exempt from the valuation and minority shareholder approval requirements of Multilateral Instrument 61-101 Protection of Minority Security Holders in Special Transactions ("MI 61-101") by virtue of the exemptions contained in Sections 5.5(b) and 5.7(1)(b) of MI 61-101. All of the securities issuable in connection with the Offering are subject to a hold period expiring four months and one day after the date of issuance. The securities offered have not been registered under the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and may not be offered or sold in the United States or to, or for the account or benefit of, U.S. persons absent registration or an applicable exemption from registration requirements. This release does not constitute an offer for sale of securities in the United States. Neither the TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of this release. Gowest is a Canadian gold exploration and development company focused on the delineation and development of its 100% owned Bradshaw Gold Deposit (Bradshaw), on the Frankfield Property, part of the Corporation's North Timmins Gold Project (NTGP). Gowest is exploring additional gold targets on its +100-square-kilometre NTGP land package and continues to evaluate the area, which is part of the prolific Timmins, Ontario gold camp. Currently, Bradshaw contains a National Instrument 43-101 Indicated Resource estimated at 2.1 million tonnes ("t") grading 6.19 grams per tonne gold (g/t Au) containing 422 thousand ounces (oz) Au and an Inferred Resource of 3.6 million t grading 6.47 g/t Au containing 755 thousand oz Au. Further, based on the Pre-Feasibility Study produced by Stantec Mining and announced on June 9, 2015, Bradshaw contains Mineral Reserves in the probable category, using a 3 g/t Au cut-off and utilizing a gold price of US$1,200 / oz, totalling 1.8 million t grading 4.82 g/t Au for 277 thousand oz Au. The technical information in this news release has been reviewed and approved by Mr. Kevin Montgomery, P.Geo., Gowest's Manager of Exploration, who is the Qualified Person for the technical information in this news release under National Instrument 43-101 standards. This news release may contain certain "forward looking statements". Forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties, assumptions and other factors that may cause the actual results, performance or achievements of the Company to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date of this news release and, except as may be required by applicable securities laws, the Company disclaims any intent or obligation to update any forward-looking statement, whether as a result of new information, future events or results or otherwise.


News Article | May 15, 2017
Site: www.prlog.org

Engineering Excellence Award for work on the Route 79/I-95 Interchange Improvements and Repair of the Braga Bridge in Fall River, MA. -- The American Council of Engineering Companies of Massachusetts (ACEC/MA) has named VHB as a finalist for an Engineering Excellence Award for work on the Route 79/I-195 Interchange Improvements and Repair of the Braga Bridge in Fall River, Massachusetts.The 2017 Engineering Excellence Awards were announced at the recent ACEC/MA Engineering Excellence and Awards Gala with emcees Carol Gladstone, Commissioner of the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance and Commissioner Leo Roy of the Department of Conservation and Recreation.VHB, with offices in Boston, provided lead design services for the $200M design buildreconstruction of the Route 79/I-195 Interchange in Fall River.  This project included removal of 11 structurally deficient bridges and reconfiguration of the interchange into a substantially at-grade system, including 8 new bridges, miles of roadway, and major traffic system and utility upgrades. The new interchange improved safety and mobility for local and regional roadway users, and supports City goals of improving connectivity and drivingdevelopment along the waterfront.  The MassDOT megaproject reached full beneficial use inJuly of 2016, more than two months ahead of schedule and within allotted budget."The winning projects exemplify ingenuity and professionalism and represent the breadth of engineering's contribution to our everyday lives," said ACEC/MA President Mark S. Bartlett PE, Senior Associate at Stantec, Inc. "They are outstanding examples of how engineers connect communities, provide safe and reliable water and energy, and make our buildings safe and efficient. The professional engineers and their colleagues at our member firms are dedicated to working on quality infrastructure, which wouldn't otherwise exist. These outstanding projects are but a few examples of the quality work designed by Massachusetts engineering firms."About ACEC/MAThe American Council of Engineering Companies of Massachusetts (ACEC/MA) is the business association of the Massachusetts engineering industry, representing over 120 independent engineering companies engaged in the development of transportation, environmental, industrial, and other infrastructure. Founded in 1960 and headquartered in Boston, MA, ACEC/MA is a member organization of the American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC) based in Washington, DC.  ACEC is a national federation of 51 state and regional organizations. For more information on ACEC/MA, visit their website at www.acecma.org . ACEC/MA is undertaking an awareness campaign to educate the public on the many contributions engineers make (or the engineering innovations)in everyday life through their hash tag #EngineeringGoFigure. To Follow us on Twitter:  @ACECMA


News Article | May 18, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Stanley Consultants announced today that Kate Harris has been elected president and CEO of the global consulting engineering firm. She steps into the position previously held by Gayle Roberts, who will become chairman of the board. Current chair, Gregs Thomopulos, who has been with the firm for over 50 years, will retire in June and become chair emeritus. “I am delighted to welcome Kate to our company,” said Thomopulos. “She brings a broad range of experience, especially in international operations which Stanley Consultants has practiced in for over 60 years. I have the utmost confidence in her ability to continue and improve upon our record of success.” Harris has 25 years of international experience in the construction, engineering and consulting industry. Most recently she provided board and executive advisory services following her global Commercial Officer role with MWH, a 7,000-employee strong engineering and construction management firm recently acquired by Stantec. At MWH, she established the firm’s first innovation practice as well as developing and executing a number of business transformation and performance improvement strategies, including leadership of MWH’s Pune-based design and support services hub and the development of global strategies and practices to improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the firm’s 1,750 technical and design employees in 78 locations worldwide. “I was drawn to Stanley Consultants’ rich legacy and culture,” says Harris. “The firm has a long history of being sought out by clients with the most challenging projects and is highly regarded for its technical innovation and exemplary client service.” Harris has a broad range of experience that includes strategy development, risk management, building high performing teams, developing client relationships and profitably growing businesses including winning and executing large and complex programs. “Kate shares our core values and philosophies. She has a proven record of accomplishments, a strong business acumen and the aptitude to integrate into Stanley Consultants’ corporate culture,” says Roberts. “I’m eager to work with her in this next chapter of Stanley Consultants.” Stanley Consultants provides program management, planning, engineering, environmental and construction services worldwide. Recognized for its commitment to client service and a passion to make a difference, Stanley Consultants brings global knowledge, experience and capabilities to serve clients in the energy, water, transportation and Federal markets. Since 1913, Stanley Consultants has successfully completed more than 25,000 engagements in all 50 states, U.S. territories, and in 110 countries. For more information on Stanley Consultants, please visit http://www.stanleyconsultants.com.


News Article | May 17, 2017
Site: www.enr.com

ENR Midwest’s 2017 expansion added a sizable swath of the nation’s heartland to our editorial coverage area. That move happened as a result of our publisher, BNP Media, making the commitment to close the gaps in ENR’s regional publications so that the 10 publications now cover the entire U.S. Our previous territory—Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin—was already expansive enough. But, by bringing in the states of Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota and Nebraska, we’ve added an extra 342,000 square miles of construction markets to report on and document. Of course, one major impact from this expansion will be seen in our annual rankings of regional “Top” firms, starting with this one, the Top Design Firms ranking. First, ENR Midwest’s geographic expansion generated an increase in the number of firms participating in this year’s survey. Compared with last year’s total of 85 survey respondents, this year’s tally of more than 110 represents a roughly 30% increase. Overall, the amount of regional revenue grew notably as well, though by that same rate. This year, Midwest engineering and architectural firms collectively reported just over $4.9 billion in 2016 design revenue from the expanded region. That compares with last year’s $3.6-billion tally of design revenue from the publication’s original coverage territory. This year, Midwest design firms reported an estimated 8% increase in revenue from the states of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Missouri, Ohio and Wisconsin, resulting in a total of just more than $3.9 billion. Revenue from projects in the “expansion” states of Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Minnesota and Nebraska tallied slightly more than $1 billion. The geographic expansion resulted not only in greater survey depth, but also in growth of individual firms’ respective revenue totals. Engineering and architectural firms ranked at the top of this year’s list—often national players—saw their numbers on the ENR Midwest Top Design Firms ranking grow notably. For instance, No. 1-ranked AECOM’s Midwest revenue grew to $553.8 million from $361.3 million a year ago, while No. 2-ranked Burns & McDonnell’s increased by nearly $200 million to tally nearly $429.6 million. Third-ranked Stantec saw its Midwest revenue more than double on this year’s ranking, while both fourth- and fifth-ranked HNTB Corp. and WSP’s reported Midwest revenue grew by 34% and 25%, respectively. The expansion also resulted in the addition of a new firm to the top 10 largest firms. St. Paul-based Short-Elliott-Hendrickson Inc. debuted in 10th place on this year’s list, with nearly $93.7 million in 2016 design revenue. Across the following pages, ENR Midwest invites its readers to further review the data from this expanded Top Design Firms ranking. On the main list, readers will find information about each firm’s major markets and projects, along with details about their executive leadership and locations. Additionally, we’ve included breakout rankings for each of the 11 states included in our expanded coverage area.


"Luminent offers sub-meter mapping accuracy – meeting or exceeding COGCC requirements," says Luminent CEO, Scott Crouch. "Companies can utilize our hardware and equipment to conduct field work including capturing location and specified characteristics. Or, Luminent can provide certified and qualified staff along with equipment to identify and document flowline features and inspection data." Luminent experts are available to help operators complete and submit reports to COGCC. With CartoPac, Luminent also offers a complete suite of enterprise mobile software applications that enable energy companies to effectively collect, manage and derive value from field asset data. According to Crouch, "Luminent stands ready to assist companies large or small to meet the state's Phase I and Phase II requirements and to help assure the safety of their system." The submittal deadlines are May 30 and June 30, respectively. Similar CartoPac technology is in use worldwide to help companies better manage distributed assets. Both Luminent and CartoPac are based in Fort Collins. About Luminent (www.Luminent.com) Luminent provides services and analytics supported by technology platforms to improve management systems in the energy industry. Luminent is a value-added partner of CartoPac and leverages and expands CartoPac technologies in the energy sector. Luminent is owned by Stantec Engineering and in partnership with CartoPac International and Reed Smith Law. About CartoPac (www.cartopac.com) CartoPac International delivers a complete suite of enterprise mobile software applications that enable companies to effectively collect and manage their field asset data. We partner with companies to deploy mobile solutions that are readily adopted by field users, support the complexities of the assets and related infrastructure, and deliver high value data that is leveraged across the organization. CartoPac was founded in 1999 and is based in Fort Collins, Colorado. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/solution-available-to-help-oil--gas-companies-comply-with-colorado-flowline-inspection-directive-300459491.html


News Article | May 24, 2017
Site: www.enr.com

Design firms continue to ride a strong wave of success in California. The 95 firms that participated in this year’s Top Design Firms survey reported $4.87 billion of combined revenue in California during 2016—a 14% increase from the previous year. In the three most recent surveys, combined revenue in the state has grown by 33%. Firms with practices in transportation and other infrastructure are particularly bullish on the market.  Don Sepulveda, deputy national market lead, rail and transit for West Coast operations at Michael Baker International, notes that several significant tax measures have passed to provide funding for transportation projects in the region. In Los Angeles, for example, passage of Measure M in November will provide $120 billion to advance the Los Angeles Metropolitan Transportation Authority’s long-range transit plan for the next four decades. “The Western United States is riding on a transportation boom,” he says. Michael Baker saw annual revenue rise 24% in California—to $120.1 million in 2016 from $96.8 million in 2015. Transportation work accounts for 19% of the firm’s total revenue. Kip Field, Southern California area manager for HDR, says his firm is also optimistic about Measure M projects, which will leverage funds from a half-cent sales tax increase that takes effect on July 1. “Funds will be immediately allocated toward larger infrastructure projects, including Link [Union Station], regional rail projects such as the Crenshaw Line, Regional Connector, Purple Line Extension, bus rapid transit projects and developments that are widely supported by the local community such as the LA River Bike Path and Rail to River Trails projects.” HDR, which saw annual revenue rise 7% in California last year, is currently working on the Link Union Station project for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority. WSP USA is banking heavily on rail work in the state. Last year, it broke ground on the $2-billion Mid-Coast Corridor Transit Project in San Diego. And, WSP USA and partner Network Rail Consulting are responsible for program management, integration, delivery and operations and maintenance planning on the California High-Speed Rail Project, which is now under construction in the Central Valley. In Los Angeles, the firm is at work on the Regional Connector and the Purple Line Extension. Some firms are also eying significant opportunities in aviation. “We anticipate demand. The need to upgrade aging infrastructure will drive opportunities in our market sectors to continue over the next five to 10 years, especially in the aviation sector,” says Brent Kelley, principal at Corgan. Corgan, in association with Gensler, is leading design of the $1.6-billion Midfield Satellite Concourse at Los Angeles International Airport. The new 12-gate facility, which will serve as an addition to Tom Bradley International Terminal, broke ground on Feb. 27. Kimley-Horn, which is the lead civil engineering consultant on the LAX Midfield Satellite Concourse project, expects to see a steady stream of work as well. “We continue to be optimistic about the next several years ahead, based on the robust funding environment through recent local and state funding commitments to transportation and other areas of infrastructure within our areas of expertise,” says Jason Matson, Kimley-Horn’s California regional leader. Stantec has positioned itself to capitalize on a wide range of opportunities in the water sector. Last year, the firm acquired MWH, which helped boost its annual revenue by 62% to $340.3 million. “We see a continued interest and investment in water infrastructure throughout California,” says Alfonso Rodriguez, Stantec’s Pacific Region vice president. “Rains from the past year have transitioned many client discussions from conservation and efficiency to storage and flood planning. Stantec’s 2016 acquisition and consequential integration of MWH has been a good pairing with these marketplace trends, with the combined companies successfully winning project work.” Woodard & Curran also firmed up its position in the water sector through acquisition, adding RMC Water and Environment in late 2016. RMC had seven offices throughout California with expertise in integrated water resource management and potable reuse. Alyson Watson, municipal west business unit leader at Woodard & Curran, says the acquisition of RMC rounds out the firm’s water resources management portfolio. In the building sectors, some firms are also seeing big bumps in revenue. Bonnie Khang-Keating, Los Angeles office director for SmithGroupJJR, says that although some small to midsize offices are experiencing a slowdown in limited sectors, “the design and construction industry seems to be strong and resilient in Southern California.” SmithGroupJJR saw revenue jump to $82.06 million in 2016 from $59.29 million in 2015. “The economy will certainly slow down at some point, bringing with it the challenge of growth and recruitment in a competitive market,” she adds. Joyce Polhamus, San Francisco office director for SmithGroupJJR, says capital spending remains strong for both institutional and private developers in the Bay Area. “As new projects are completed in the city, we expect to see an uptick in office tenant improvement and retrofit projects,” she says. “Health care activity will likely remain steady as well, with a wave of backfill projects and continued growth in ambulatory, specialty care, urgent care and cancer centers.  The seismic upgrade deadline of 2030 continues to drive the need for replacement hospitals in the Bay Area, Sacramento and Central Valley.” Amy Williams, managing principal at HDR in Pasadena, also sees seismic work keeping the health care market steady for years to come. “The future of health care in America continues to be unsure,” she says. “Nonetheless, California Senate Bills 1953 and 90 are mandating facilities be compliant with state seismic requirements by 2020/2030. The level of national insecurity related to health care spending has caused a number of organizations to delay upgrades. At this point, time is the critical factor for compliance and a number of entities are moving forward with the necessary upgrades.”


News Article | May 25, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

(DENVER) – The American Water Works Association announced today that Olympic champion Amy Van Dyken and a panel of water industry leaders will speak at the association’s Annual Conference & Exposition (ACE17), to be held June 11-14 in Philadelphia. Three noteworthy leaders in the water industry will be part of a panel discussion at ACE17’s Opening General Session at 8:30 a.m. on Mon., June 12 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The panel will feature: The event will be sponsored by HomeServe, a leading provider of home repair service plans. Additionally, Amy Van Dyken will speak during ACE17’s Water Industry Luncheon at 12 p.m. on Tues., June 13 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Van Dyken is a six-time Olympic gold medalist in swimming, four of which she won at the 1996 Summer Olympics. In 2014, a severe all-terrain vehicle accident left her partially paralyzed. She will speak about her experience as a world-class athlete and the obstacles she has overcome throughout her career. The event will be sponsored by CDM Smith and Stantec. Visit ACE17’s webpage to view the conference program and to register. Standard registration rates end on May 31. Media note: Accredited members of the media may attend ACE17 at no charge. However, they are required to register with AWWA Public Affairs by May 31. For media registration, please visit the AWWA Press Room or contact Deirdre Mueller at dmueller(at)awwa.org or at 303-347-6140. Established in 1881, the American Water Works Association is the largest nonprofit, scientific and educational association dedicated to managing and treating water, the world’s most important resource. With approximately 50,000 members, AWWA provides solutions to improve public health, protect the environment, strengthen the economy and enhance our quality of life.


Patent
Stantec Inc. | Date: 2014-10-14

An apparatus and method for monitoring sanitary sewer systems designed to carry away wastewater through a system of buried pipes, often referred to as sewer lines, to a sewage treatment facility, the apparatus and method use a weir which facilitates the collection of flow rate data in the sewer lines which in turn facilitates the determination of infiltration and inflow (I/I) of rain water, or clear water, into the sewer system in a manner which further allows the identification of specific I/I locations so that repair and construction of sewer systems can be efficiently coordinated.


Patent
Stantec Inc. | Date: 2012-12-13

A system and method facilitating review, communication and monitoring of regulatory compliance on a utility or project and in particular a computerized, web-based, environmental compliance system (ECS) which monitors, evaluates and displays environmental compliance (or non-compliance) information for any utility or construction project. This includes receiving, storing, communicating and displaying compliance data and information extending over the life of the project from (a) project development phase, through (b) the construction phase, (c) operation phase, and finally (d) project decommissioning phase.

Loading Stantec Inc. collaborators
Loading Stantec Inc. collaborators