Stanford Cancer Institute

Stanford, CA, United States

Stanford Cancer Institute

Stanford, CA, United States
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News Article | April 19, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.com

The NCCN Radiation Therapy Compendium™ provides guidance on all RT modalities recommended within the NCCN Guidelines, including Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT), Intra-Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT), Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS)/Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT)/Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy (SABR), Image-guided Radiotherapy (IGRT), Low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR)/High dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR), Radioisotope, and Particle Therapy. Transparency of NCCN Guidelines and Compendia development is central to the philosophy, policies, and procedures of NCCN. NCCN posts the policies and processes for developing and maintaining the NCCN Guidelines. These policies are available to the public on the NCCN website. Identification of newly published research, NCCN Member Institution review, external stakeholder submissions, and panel review occur on an ongoing basis with at least annual review performed for NCCN Guidelines for each disease. The NCCN Guidelines are the recognized standard for clinical policy in cancer care and are the most thorough and most frequently updated clinical practice guidelines available in any area of medicine. Other NCCN Guidelines derivative products include: For more information and to access the NCCN Radiation Therapy Compendium™, visit NCCN.org/RTCompendium. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 of the world's leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nine-new-disease-sites-added-to-the-nccn-radiation-therapy-compendium-300441832.html


​​​​​​In 2007, not long after fulfilling her dream of living in Paris, France, Karla Baptiste was diagnosed with stage III breast cancer at the age of 34. She had just received her MBA and, like most new graduates, she was on top of the world and thinking ‘The best is yet to come!’ “I could not have been more optimistic. I never would have thought I would be battling breast cancer the following year!” she said. The cancer diagnosis was a shocker to say the least but she took solace in knowing that if her life were to end soon she had no regrets. She had followed her dream and lived it up in Paris like it was her last chance. Another dream of Baptiste’s was to become an author. When she was first diagnosed with breast cancer, she began reading breast cancer memoirs which only took the reader through treatment. Baptiste was always left wondering ‘what happened next?’. This inspired Baptiste to publish her own story. She started writing her memoir, Dig in Your Heels: The Glamorous (and Not So) Glamorous Life of a Young Breast Cancer Survivor, a couple of years after being diagnosed. She was hoping to tell her story from diagnosis to reaching the coveted five-year cancer-free anniversary. Fortunately, she is part of the 72% of women who survive beyond five years after a stage III breast cancer diagnosis. However, in July 2014, as Baptiste was preparing to publish her memoir, she discovered that her cancer had returned to her spine making it stage IV. Determined more than ever to share her message of hope, Baptiste turned to crowdfunding to raise money to publish her memoir. Her goal was $10,000 but she raised over $13,000 in two months! During the months of February and March, Baptiste will use her book and her crowdfunding chops to help raise money to establish an oncology center in her father’s birthplace, St. Vincent and the Grenadines— an island country in the Lesser Antilles in the Caribbean. Baptiste had always intended to use her memoir to give back. Typically, ten percent of the proceeds from the sale of Dig in Your Heels goes to breast cancer research and outreach. However, upon learning that cancer patients in her fatherland often forgo treatment and die because there isn’t a treatment center on the island, she wanted to give in a bigger way. The closest place to receive treatment for Vincentians is Trinidad making the cost and inconvenience of travel a hindrance to receiving care. In February, the St. Vincent and the Grenadines Medical Association launched an Indiegogo campaign to raise money for the new oncology center. Their goal is $250,000. “When I heard about the goal, I wished that I had sold more books so that I could fund the entire center myself. But after I thought about it, I realized that I could give 100% of my net proceeds now. Maybe my commitment to be “all in” would inspire others to give big too.” said Baptiste. “I know what it’s like to go through a cancer battle and it’s important to receive care close to your loved ones and not have to worry about added expenses. Having cancer is burden enough.” Dig in Your Heels: The Glamorous (and Not So) Glamorous Life of a Young Breast Cancer Survivor can be purchased at Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, and iTunes. One hundred percent of the proceeds will go to establish the oncology center in St. Vincent. For more information about the book and the oncology center, visit www.diginyourheels.com. Karla Antoinette Baptiste was born and raised in Seattle, Washington. She has a Bachelor degree in Business Administration from the University of Washington and a Master of International Business from Schiller International University - Paris, France. When Baptiste was first diagnosed with breast cancer she was living in the San Francisco Bay Area and was treated at Diablo Valley Oncology. Upon moving to the Dallas, TX area in December of 2013, Baptiste was diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer and sought treatment at the Cancer Treatment Centers of America in Zion, IL. Baptiste is an ambassador for the Stanford Cancer Institute Community Partnership Program, which aims to reduce breast cancer disparities among African-American women. She is also a Cancer Fighters® ambassador for the Cancer Treatment Centers of America and a member of Sisters Network, Inc. Baptiste works in sales for a major Food and Beverage manufacturer and lives near Dallas, TX with her dog, Armani.


"NCCN ORP congratulates Dr. Gomez and Dr. Jänne on their awards and looks forward to the commencement of their studies," said Susan Most, RN, MBA, Director, Clinical Operations, NCCN ORP. "We are pleased to be working with AstraZeneca on further evaluation of osimertinib, an important targeted agent for the treatment of EGFRm+ non-small cell lung cancer. This project furthers NCCN's commitment to improving the lives of patients with cancer by providing opportunities to identify additional treatment options in lung cancer." Submissions were peer reviewed by the NCCN Osimertinib Scientific Review Committee. The funded concepts were selected based on several criteria, including scientific merit, existing data, and the types of studies necessary to further evaluate the efficacy of osimertinib. NCCN ORP draws upon the expertise of investigators at the NCCN Member Institutions and their affiliates to facilitate all phases of clinical research. This research is made possible by collaborations with pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies in order to advance therapeutic options for patients with cancer. To date, this successful research model has received more than $60 million in research grants and supported more than 140 studies, producing a number of publications in peer-reviewed journals. To learn more about the NCCN ORP and ongoing clinical trials, visit NCCN.org/ORP. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network® (NCCN®), a not-for-profit alliance of 27 leading cancer centers devoted to patient care, research, and education, is dedicated to improving the quality, effectiveness, and efficiency of cancer care so that patients can live better lives. Through the leadership and expertise of clinical professionals at NCCN Member Institutions, NCCN develops resources that present valuable information to the numerous stakeholders in the health care delivery system. As the arbiter of high-quality cancer care, NCCN promotes the importance of continuous quality improvement and recognizes the significance of creating clinical practice guidelines appropriate for use by patients, clinicians, and other health care decision-makers. The NCCN Member Institutions are: Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center, Omaha, NE; Case Comprehensive Cancer Center/University Hospitals Seidman Cancer Center and Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH; City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA; Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center | Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA; Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC; Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA; Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT; Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center/Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, Seattle, WA; The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD; Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, IL; Mayo Clinic Cancer Center, Phoenix/Scottsdale, AZ, Jacksonville, FL, and Rochester, MN; Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY; Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL; The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center - James Cancer Hospital and Solove Research Institute, Columbus, OH; Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY; Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO; St. Jude Children's Research Hospital/The University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, TN; Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, CA; University of Alabama at Birmingham Comprehensive Cancer Center, Birmingham, AL; UC San Diego Moores Cancer Center, La Jolla, CA; UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA; University of Colorado Cancer Center, Aurora, CO; University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, MI; The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX; University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, WI; Vanderbilt-Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, TN; and Yale Cancer Center/Smilow Cancer Hospital, New Haven, CT. To view the original version on PR Newswire, visit:http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nccn-awards-grants-to-investigators-at-member-institutions-to-study-osimertinib-in-lung-cancer-300463998.html


Millions of people wear some kind of wristband activity tracker and use the device to monitor their own exercise and health, often sharing the data with their physician. But is the data accurate? Such people can take heart in knowing that if the device measures heart rate, it's probably doing a good job, a team of researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine reports. But if it measures energy expenditure, it's probably off by a significant amount. An evaluation of seven devices in a diverse group of 60 volunteers showed that six of the devices measured heart rate with an error rate of less than 5 percent. The team evaluated the Apple Watch, Basis Peak, Fitbit Surge, Microsoft Band, Mio Alpha 2, PulseOn and the Samsung Gear S2. Some devices were more accurate than others, and factors such as skin color and body mass index affected the measurements. In contrast, none of the seven devices measured energy expenditure accurately, the study found. Even the most accurate device was off by an average of 27 percent. And the least accurate was off by 93 percent. "People are basing life decisions on the data provided by these devices," said Euan Ashley, DPhil, FRCP, professor of cardiovascular medicine, of genetics and of biomedical data science at Stanford. But consumer devices aren't held to the same standards as medical-grade devices, and it's hard for doctors to know what to make of heart-rate data and other data from a patient's wearable device, he said. A paper reporting the researchers' findings will be published online May 24 in the Journal of Personalized Medicine. Ashley is the senior author. Lead authorship is shared by graduate student Anna Shcherbina, visiting assistant professor Mikael Mattsson, PhD, and senior research scientist Daryl Waggott. Hard for consumers to know device accuracy Manufacturers may test the accuracy of activity devices extensively, said Ashley, but it's hard for consumers to know how accurate such information is or the process that the manufacturers used in testing the devices. So Ashley and his colleagues set out to independently evaluate activity trackers that met criteria such as measuring both heart rate and energy expenditure and being commercially available. "For a lay user, in a non-medical setting, we want to keep that error under 10 percent," Shcherbina said. Sixty volunteers, including 31 women and 29 men, wore the seven devices while walking or running on treadmills or using stationary bicycles. Each volunteer's heart was measured with a medical-grade electrocardiograph. Metabolic rate was estimated with an instrument for measuring the oxygen and carbon dioxide in breath -- a good proxy for metabolism and energy expenditure. Results from the wearable devices were then compared to the measurements from the two "gold standard" instruments. "The heart rate measurements performed far better than we expected," said Ashley, "but the energy expenditure measures were way off the mark. The magnitude of just how bad they were surprised me." The take-home message, he said, is that a user can pretty much rely on a fitness tracker's heart rate measurements. But basing the number of doughnuts you eat on how many calories your device says you burned is a really bad idea, he said. Neither Ashley nor Shcherbina could be sure why energy-expenditure measures were so far off. Each device uses its own proprietary algorithm for calculating energy expenditure, they said. It's likely the algorithms are making assumptions that don't fit individuals very well, said Shcherbina. "All we can do is see how the devices perform against the gold-standard clinical measures," she said. "My take on this is that it's very hard to train an algorithm that would be accurate across a wide variety of people because energy expenditure is variable based on someone's fitness level, height and weight, etc." Heart rate, she said, is measured directly, whereas energy expenditure must be measured indirectly through proxy calculations. Ashley's team saw a need to make their evaluations of wearable devices open to the research community, so they created a website that shows their own data. They welcome others to upload data related to device performance at http://precision. . The team is already working on the next iteration of their study, in which they are evaluating the devices while volunteers wear them as they go about a normal day, including exercising in the open, instead of walking or running on a laboratory treadmill. "In phase two," said Shcherbina, "we actually want a fully portable study. So volunteers' ECG will be portable and their energy calculation will also be done with a portable machine." The work is an example of Stanford Medicine's focus on precision health, the goal of which is to anticipate and prevent disease in the healthy and precisely diagnose and treat disease in the ill. Other Stanford co-authors are clinical nurse specialist Heidi Salisbury, RN, MSN; clinical exercise physiologist Jeffrey Christle, PhD; Trevor Hastie, PhD, professor of statistics and of biomedical data science; and Matthew Wheeler, MD, PhD, clinical assistant professor of cardiovascular medicine. Ashley is also a member of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, the Stanford Child Health Research Institute and Stanford Bio-X. Hastie is a member of CHRI, Bio-X, the Stanford Cancer Institute and the Stanford Neurosciences Institute. Stanford's departments of Medicine, of Genetics and of Biomedical Data Science supported the work. The Stanford University School of Medicine consistently ranks among the nation's top medical schools, integrating research, medical education, patient care and community service. For more news about the school, please visit http://med. . The medical school is part of Stanford Medicine, which includes Stanford Health Care and Stanford Children's Health. For information about all three, please visit http://med. .

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