STANDARD Foods Co.

Taiwan

STANDARD Foods Co.

Taiwan
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Peng C.-H.,Hungkuang University | Chang H.-C.,Chung Shan Medical University | Yang M.-Y.,Chung Shan Medical University | Huang C.-N.,Chung Shan Medical University | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Functional Foods | Year: 2013

Obesity accompanied with metabolic disorder is often complicated by hepatic regulations of lipid metabolism and lipoprotein recruitment. Recent reports have suggested that oat has metabolic-regulating effect. In this study, we examined whether oat could improve obesity, body fat, serum parameters and liver lipid metabolism. In high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed rats, oat effectively reduced body weight and fat, and decreased food efficiency but not appetite. Oat lowered serum glucose, free-fatty-acid (FFA), triacylglycerol (TG), cholesterol, and LDL-C/HDL-C elevated by HFD, and dose-dependently reduced hepatic TG and cholesterol. Thirty percent oat markedly reduced lipid synthesis biomarkers FAS, GPAT and HMG CoA reductase, while 15% and 30% oat stimulated expressions of oxidation markers PPARα, CPT-1 and phosphorylated-AMPK. Oat increased LDL receptor, being beneficial for serum lipid-lowering. Thus, Oat could act as adjuvant therapeutics for metabolic disorders via attenuating obesity, body fat, and improving serum parameters with metabolic regulation and lipid clearance of liver. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Chang H.-C.,Chung Shan Medical University | Huang C.-N.,Chung Shan Medical University | Yeh D.-M.,Chung Shan Medical University | Wang S.-J.,STANDARD Foods Co. | And 2 more authors.
Plant Foods for Human Nutrition | Year: 2013

Obesity is associated with a great diversity of diseases including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Our recent report suggested that oat, rich in beta-glucan, had a metabolic-regulating and liver-protecting effect in an animal model. In this study, we performed a clinical trial to further confirm the effect of oat. Subjects with BMI ≧27 and aged 18-65, were randomly divided into a control (n = 18) and an oat-treated (n = 16) group, taking a placebo or beta glucan-containing oat cereal, respectively, for 12 weeks. Our data showed that consumption of oat reduced body weight, BMI, body fat and the waist-to-hip ratio. Profiles of hepatic function, including AST, but especially ALT, were useful resources to help in the evaluation of the liver, since both showed decrements in patients with oat consumption. Nevertheless, anatomic changes were still not observed by ultrasonic image analysis. Ingestion of oat was well tolerated and there was no adverse effect during the trial. In conclusion, consumption of oat reduced obesity, abdominal fat, and improved lipid profiles and liver functions. Taken as a daily supplement, oat could act as an adjuvant therapy for metabolic disorders. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Hsu B.Y.,National Taiwan University of Science and Technology | Hsu B.Y.,University of Kang Ning | Lu T.J.,National Taiwan University of Science and Technology | Chen C.H.,National Taiwan University of Science and Technology | And 2 more authors.
Food Chemistry | Year: 2013

Ginseng and lingzhi (Ganoderma lucidum) both are valuable traditional Chinese medicines and have been extensively utilised in functional foods and traditional medicines in many Asian countries. However, massive quantity of ginseng residue is produced after extraction of ginseng which still contains a lot of bioactive compounds such as ginsenosides. The goal of this study was to reuse the American ginseng extraction residue as the fermentation medium of G. lucidum to produce bioactive ginsenoside enriched biotransformation products. The changes of ginsenosides in the fermentation products were analysed during fermentation. Our results showed that after 30 days of fermentation, ginsenoside Rg1, Rd, and compound K (CK) significantly increased, especially Rd, while other ginsenosides (Re, Rb1 and Rc) decreased during fermentation. Ginsenoside Rd is the major ginsenoside in the final fermentation product. Furthermore, the biotransformation of ginsenosides was the major reaction in this fermentation process. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


A method for preparing an instant noodle, a flour composition for an instant noodle, and an instant noodle are disclosed. The method for preparing the instant noodle includes preprocessing a non-wheat cereal to form processed non-wheat cereal flour. The method further includes providing a non-wheat cereal component having the processed non-wheat cereal flour, and mixing the non-wheat cereal component with a wheat component to form a flour composition. The amount of the non-wheat cereal component is at least 50 weight percent of the total weight of the flour composition, and the amount of the wheat component is 7.5-50 weight percent of the total weight of the flour composition. The flour composition is then formed into the instant noodle.


Trademark
Standard Foods Corporation | Date: 2013-01-15

sunflower oil; rape flower oil, grape seed oil, plant oil, namely, olive oil, salad oil, corn oil, soybean oil, meat, meat extracts, namely, chicken extracts, peanut soup, red beans soup, mung beans soup, swallow-nests soup.


Trademark
Standard Foods Corporation | Date: 2011-08-23

Noodles, Spaghetti, Pasta, Macaroni.


A method for preparing an instant noodle, a flour composition for an instant noodle, and an instant noodle are disclosed. The method for preparing the instant noodle includes preprocessing a non-wheat cereal to form processed non-wheat cereal flour. The method further includes providing a non-wheat cereal component having the processed non-wheat cereal flour, and mixing the non-wheat cereal component with a wheat component to form a flour composition. The amount of the non-wheat cereal component is at least 50 weight percent of the total weight of the flour composition, and the amount of the wheat component is 7.5-50 weight percent of the total weight of the flour composition. The flour composition is then formed into the instant noodle.


Trademark
Standard Foods Corporation | Date: 2011-12-01

Multi cereal fiber powder for use as a dietary supplement; beverages containing chlorophyll for use as a nutritional supplement; Chinese herbs for medicinal purposes; tonic supplements, namely, homeopathic supplements; chondroitin preparations, dietary supplemental drinks, dietary supplemental drinks in the nature of vitamin and mineral beverages; dietary supplements, gummy vitamins, health food supplements, herbal drinks used to aid in sleep and relaxation, herbal supplements, herbal supplements for sleeping problems, highly caffeinated energy pills, liquid nutritional supplement, liquid vitamin supplements, meal replacement and dietary supplement drink mixes, medicinal herb extracts, multivitamin preparations, multi-vitamin preparations, natural herbal supplements, nutraceuticals for the use by patients in aiding recovery from illnesses, injuries and surgery; nutraceuticals for use as a dietary supplement; nutraceuticals for use as a dietary supplement for general health benefits; nutritional supplements, nutritional supplements in the nature of nutritionally fortified soft chews, nutritionally fortified beverages, vitamin and mineral supplements, vitamin and mineral additives for use as dietary supplements, vitamin fortified beverages, vitamin preparations, vitamin supplements, vitamin tablets, weight management supplements. Sunflower oil, rape flower oil, edible grape seed oil, edible plant oil, olive oil, salad oil, corn oil, soybean oil, meat and meat extracts, chicken extracts, peanut soup, red beans soup, mung beans soup, swallow-nests soup; milk products excluding ice cream, ice milk and frozen yogurt; milk powder, protein powder for use as a food additive. Breakfast cereals; flour made from processed cereal; rolled oats, oatmeal, rice flour, almond paste, Chinese pearl barley flour, black soybean flour, sesame paste, multi grain flour, noodles. Apple juice beverages; beauty beverages, namely, fruit juices and energy drinks containing nutritional supplements; bottled drinking water, carbonated waters, cola, concentrated fruit juice, distilled drinking water, energy drinks, fruit juice, grape juice, herbal juices, milk of almonds for beverage, oat-based beverages with fruit juice not for food purposes, orange juice, orange juice beverages, pop, ramune, sarsaparilla, soy-based beverages not being milk substitutes, sports drinks, table water, tomato juice beverages, vegetable drinks, vegetable juice beverage; vegetable fruit juices, water beverages, whey beverages. Wholesale food distributorship services, Wholesale and retail store services featuring food, Wholesale and retail store services featuring beverages, Wholesale and retail store services featuring medicines, Retail pharmacy services, Retail drug stores, Retail drug store service.


Trademark
Standard Foods Corporation | Date: 2010-04-16

Protein nutritional supplements, lecithin for use as a dietary supplement. Animal oils for food, vegetable oils for food, beverages consisting principally of milk, milk powder, milk. salt, sauces, vinegar; condiments, namely, mayonnaise, mustard and ketchup; sugar, honey, beverages made of tea, cocoa, coffee, ice and ice cream; Soya sauce. Aerated water, fruit juice, distilled drinking water and mineral water.


PubMed | Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung Hospital Ministry of Health and Well being and Standard Foods Corporation
Type: | Journal: Chinese medicine | Year: 2016

Si-Wu-Tang (SWT) is used to treat various gynecological disorders in Chinese medicine. This study investigated the antioxidant and physiological effects of SWT on the skin and liver in healthy adults.This randomized, crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted at Chung Shan Medical University Hospital in December 2008. Participants with uncontrolled diabetes, heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, cancer, and pregnancy were excluded. Sixty healthy volunteers taking no medications were recruited from the community based on the results of their medical history questionnaires and biochemical analyses to confirm their health status. The participants were assigned to two groups: one group drank 125mL of placebo (n=30) and the other drank SWT (n=30) for six continuous days per month for 6months. The placebo and SWT were then switched between the groups after a 1-month washout period. Anthropometric measurements (body weight, body fat, and body mass index) were performed and fasting blood samples were drawn for various biochemical assays at 1, 3, 6, 10 and 13months. Abdominal ultrasound and skin examinations were performed at 1, 6 and 13months. The skin examinations involved assessment of skin roughness, sebum content, hydration, surface water loss, erythema, melanin index, and elasticity on the face (sunlight-exposed sites: middle of ear and nose) and inner arm (sunlight-unexposed sites: center of wrist and elbow joint).Administration of SWT significantly increased the antioxidant index (P=0.001) and antioxidant enzymes activities (P=0.001) from baseline to month 6. SWT also suppressed the concentration of serum lipids (triglycerides, P=0.01; high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, P=0.23; low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, P=0.48) and hepatic marker enzymes (glutamic pyruvic transaminase, P=0.76; glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, P=0.65) when compared with the placebo group. Abdominal ultrasound in the SWT group revealed a positive impact of SWT on mild fatty liver, gallstones, and mild splenomegaly. Moreover, SWT intake concomitantly elevated erythema (P=0.011) and markedly lowered skin surface water loss (P=0.016), sebum content (P=0.021), and wrinkles (P=0.024).Oral administration of SWT for 6months improved the antioxidant level and positively regulated the lipid profile, liver function, and skin integrity and texture.

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