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Guven S.,University of Basel | Guven S.,Red Cross | Karagianni M.,St Thomass Hospital London | Schwalbe M.,St Thomass Hospital London | And 9 more authors.
Tissue Engineering - Part C: Methods | Year: 2012

The stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue has gained popularity as a source of autologous progenitor cells for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. The aim of this study was to validate a newly developed, automated procedure to isolate adipose-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (ASCs) from adult human lipoaspirates in a closed and clinical-grade device, based on the Sepax® technology. Using a total of 11 donors, this procedure was compared with the standard operator-based manual separation in terms of isolation yield, clonogenic fraction, phenotype, and differentiation potential of ASCs. As compared with the manual process, automation resulted in a 62% higher isolation yield, with 2.6±1.2×105 nucleated cells per mL of liposuction, and a 24% higher frequency of clonogenic progenitors. The variability in the isolation yield and clonogenicity across different preparations was reduced by 18% and 50%, respectively. The cytofluorimetric profile and in vitro differentiation capacity into mesenchymal lineages were comparable in the cells isolated using the two procedures. The new Sepax-based process thus allows an efficient isolation of ASCs with higher and more reproducible yields than the standard manual procedure, along with minimal operator intervention. These results are expected to facilitate the use of ASCs for clinical purposes, either within an intraoperative setting or in combination with further in vitro cell expansion/cultivation. © Copyright 2012, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2012.


Story L.,St Thomass Hospital London | Pasupathy D.,St Thomass Hospital London | Sankaran S.,St Thomass Hospital London | Sharland G.,Evelina Childrens Hospital | Kyle P.,St Thomass Hospital London
Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research | Year: 2015

Aim The incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) accounts for the largest proportion of infant mortality attributable to birth defects. Associations have previously been reported between CHD and low birthweight. Low birthweight is independently associated with adverse outcome and has characteristically been calculated using population-based charts. This aim of this study was to determine the incidence of small for gestational age (SGA) in fetuses with CHD utilizing customized birthweight centiles and to determine the effect of SGA on adverse outcome. Methods A retrospective cohort study was performed between 2006 and 2011. All singleton fetuses with CHD, with no associated karyotype or structural extra-cardiac abnormalities, who delivered at St Thomas's Hospital, London, were included. Population and customized birthweight centiles were calculated and perinatal outcome data were recorded. Results A total of 17% of fetuses with CHD had a birthweight centile <10th when population centiles were used, and 25% when customized birthweight centiles were applied. There was no correlation between SGA and increased adverse perinatal outcome. Conclusions A high proportion of fetuses with CHD are classified as SGA when both population and customized birthweight centiles are used. SGA does not correlate with adverse outcome in the perinatal period. The cardiac defect therefore appears to be the main determinant of outcome and not the size of the baby at delivery. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2015 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.


PubMed | Evelina Childrens Hospital and St Thomass Hospital London
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The journal of obstetrics and gynaecology research | Year: 2015

The incidence of congenital heart disease (CHD) accounts for the largest proportion of infant mortality attributable to birth defects. Associations have previously been reported between CHD and low birthweight. Low birthweight is independently associated with adverse outcome and has characteristically been calculated using population-based charts. This aim of this study was to determine the incidence of small for gestational age (SGA) in fetuses with CHD utilizing customized birthweight centiles and to determine the effect of SGA on adverse outcome.A retrospective cohort study was performed between 2006 and 2011. All singleton fetuses with CHD, with no associated karyotype or structural extra-cardiac abnormalities, who delivered at St Thomass Hospital, London, were included. Population and customized birthweight centiles were calculated and perinatal outcome data were recorded.A total of 17% of fetuses with CHD had a birthweight centile <10th when population centiles were used, and 25% when customized birthweight centiles were applied. There was no correlation between SGA and increased adverse perinatal outcome.A high proportion of fetuses with CHD are classified as SGA when both population and customized birthweight centiles are used. SGA does not correlate with adverse outcome in the perinatal period. The cardiac defect therefore appears to be the main determinant of outcome and not the size of the baby at delivery.

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