Salt Lake City, UT, United States

St Marks Hospital & St Marks Diabetes Center

www.yahoo.com.
Salt Lake City, UT, United States

Time filter

Source Type

PubMed | St Marks Hospital & St Marks Diabetes Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of diabetes science and technology | Year: 2016

We assessed the impact of almost daily use of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) in adults with type 1 diabetes who had at least 1 year of CGM experience.In this single-center survey, we utilized a 16-item questionnaire to assess changes hypoglycemia fear, incidence of emergency medical treatment and utilization of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) before and after 1 year of CGM use. Participation was restricted to individuals who used the same brand of CGM system to avoid confounding responses due to differences between commercial devices. Participants were recruited on an as-seen basis from a major, urban internal medicine clinic and associated diabetes education center. The questionnaire was completed during the clinic visit. Responses to the survey were analyzed by standard descriptive statistics.Seventy-four patients completed the survey: 42.9 years (range: 23-71 years), 38 (51%) female, 59 current insulin pump users. Most (84%) reported wearing their devices almost daily (n = 58) or 3 weeks per month (n = 4). Almost daily users reported an 86% reduction in incidence of emergency medical treatment events (P = .0013) and >50% reduction in daily SMBG frequency (P < .0001). Reductions in hypoglycemia fear were apparent but not statistically significant (P = .7359).Almost daily use of CGM with the Dexcom G4 system reduced incidence of emergency treatment events and daily SMBG utilization among survey respondents and a trend toward reduced hypoglycemia fear. This may indicate cost savings in reduction of emergency medical intervention and likely improved quality of life without increasing safety concerns related to hypoglycemia.


PubMed | St Marks Hospital & St Marks Diabetes Center
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of diabetes science and technology | Year: 2014

We assessed the impact of perceived insulin pump usability on attitudes toward insulin pump therapy in diabetic individuals currently treated with multiple daily insulin injections (MDI). This comparative, single-arm study recruited 28 adults with type 1 (n = 16) and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes (n = 12) to evaluate 2 current insulin pumps: Medtronic Revel 723 (Pump 1), Asante Snap Insulin Pump (Pump 2). Participants were randomized 1:1 to 1 of 2 assessment sequences: Pump 1 followed by Pump 2; and Pump 2 followed by Pump 1. Structured observational protocols were utilized to assess participants ability and time required to learn/perform common tasks associated with pump setup/use. Participants used a modified version of the System Usability Scale (SUS) and investigator-developed questionnaires to rate pump usability and task difficulty; pre-post questionnaires assessed changes in attitudes toward insulin pump therapy. All participants completed the study. SUS scores showed Pump 2 to be more usable than Pump 1 on all usability attributes. Participants rated Pump 2 more positively than Pump 1, overall mean SUS scores of 5.7 versus 4.1 respectively, F(1, 52) = 32.7, P < .001, and SUS scores were higher if participants used the Pump 2 last, 5.3 versus 4.4 for Pump 1 last, F(1, 52) = 10.8, P < .01. Pump 2 was preferred for all tasks: manual bolus (86%), bolus calculation (71%), managing basal rates (93%), interpreting alarms (96%), transferring settings (100%), changing insulin and infusion sets (93%), all P < .05. Perceptions of pump usability can directly impact acceptance and use of features that may benefit those who wear them. Simpler pump devices that decrease perceptions of complexity may encourage broader use of this technology.

Loading St Marks Hospital & St Marks Diabetes Center collaborators
Loading St Marks Hospital & St Marks Diabetes Center collaborators