Boise, ID, United States
Boise, ID, United States

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Gonzales M.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Krebill H.,University of Kansas Medical Center
Preventing Chronic Disease | Year: 2014

Background: Melanoma incidence and mortality rates in Idaho are higher than national averages. The importance of increased awareness of skin cancer has been cited by state and local organizations. St. Luke's Mountain States Tumor Institute (MSTI) prioritized educational outreach efforts to focus on the implementation of a skin cancer prevention program in rural Idaho. Community Context: As a community cancer center, MSTI expanded cancer education services to include dedicated support to rural communities. Through this expansion, an MSTI educator sought to partner with a community organization to provide sun-safety education. MSTI selected, adapted, and implemented an evidence-based program, Pool Cool. Methods: The education program was implemented in 5 phases. In Phase I, we identified and recruited a community partner; in Phase 2, after thorough research, we selected a program, Pool Cool; in Phase 3, we planned the details of the program, including identification of desired short- and long-term outcomes and adaptation of existing program materials; in Phase 4, we implemented the program in summer 2012; in Phase 5, we assessed program sustainability and expansion. Outcome: MSTI developed a sustainable partnership with Payette Municipal Pool, and in summer 2012, we implemented Pool Cool. Sun-safety education was provided to more than 700 young people aged 2 to 17 years, and educational signage and sunscreen benefitted hundreds of additional pool patrons. Interpretation: Community cancer centers are increasingly being asked to assess community needs and implement evidence-based prevention and screening programs. Clinical staff may become facilitators of evidence-based public health programs. Challenges of implementing evidence-based programs in the context of a community cancer centers are staffing, leveraging of resources, and ongoing training and support.


Manning J.,University of Utah | Manning J.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Mitchell B.,University of Utah | Mitchell B.,LDS Hospital | And 10 more authors.
Antioxidants and Redox Signaling | Year: 2013

Aims: Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is thought to enhance immune function, but the mechanisms involved are obscure. We utilized an in vitro model of T-cell maturation to evaluate the role of ascorbic acid in lymphocyte development. Results: Ascorbic acid was essential for the developmental progression of mouse bone marrow-derived progenitor cells to functional T-lymphocytes in vitro and also played a role in vivo. Ascorbate-mediated enhancement of T-cell development was lymphoid cell-intrinsic and independent of T-cell receptor (TCR) rearrangement. Analysis of TCR rearrangements demonstrated that ascorbic acid enhanced the selection of functional TCRαβ after the stage of β-selection. Genes encoding the coreceptor CD8 as well as the kinase ZAP70 were upregulated by ascorbic acid. Pharmacologic inhibition of methylation marks on DNA and histones enhanced ascorbate-mediated differentiation, suggesting an epigenetic mechanism of Cd8 gene regulation via active demethylation by ascorbate-dependent Fe2+ and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases. Innovation: We speculate that one aspect of gene regulation mediated by ascorbate occurs at the level of chromatin demethylation, mediated by Jumonji C (JmjC) domain enzymes that are known to be reliant upon ascorbate as a cofactor. JmjC domain enzymes are also known to regulate transcription factor activity. These two mechanisms are likely to play key roles in the modulation of immune development and function by ascorbic acid. Conclusion: Our results provide strong experimental evidence supporting a role for ascorbic acid in T-cell maturation as well as insight into the mechanism of ascorbate-mediated enhancement of immune function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2054-2067. © Copyright 2013, Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2013.


Rosales A.R.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Byrne D.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Burnham C.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Watts L.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Oncology Practice | Year: 2014

Purpose: The 2015 Commission on Cancer standards require that cancer survivors receive an individualized survivorship care plan (SCP). To meet this new standard, St Luke's Mountain States Tumor Institute (MSTI), with support from the National Community Cancer Centers Program, implemented a successful survivorship model. Patients and Methods: At MSTI, the patient's SCP is prepared in the electronic health record by a registered health information technician. This document is reviewed during an appointment with a nurse practitioner and social worker. The provider's dictation is mailed to the primary care physician with the SCP. From August 2011 to Oct 2012, 118 patients with breast cancer were seen for survivorship appointments. Medical record audit and follow-up telephone call were completed to evaluate patient survivorship needs and satisfaction with the appointment. Patient accounts were reviewed for reimbursement. Results: From medical record review, the most common patient concerns were weight management (35%), fatigue (30%), sexuality (27%), anxiety (23%), caregiver stress (17%), and depression (16%). Telephone calls showed high patient satisfaction and understanding. Patients rated the following statements on a Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree): I understand my treatment summary and care plan (88% strongly agree or agree), and I feel the survivorship visit met my survivorship needs (86% strongly agree or agree). At 1 month, 80% of participants were still working on wellness goals. Patient accounts analysis showed revenue covered costs. Conclusion: Survivorship care at MSTI meets new standards, allows for patient engagement and satisfaction, and improves care coordination. Costs are covered by reimbursement. Copyright © 2013 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.


Kalis J.A.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Pence S.J.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Mancini R.S.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Zuckerman D.S.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Ineck J.R.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute
Journal of Oncology Practice | Year: 2015

Oral oncolytics are becoming increasingly utilized for cancer treatment, but the frequency of off-label oral oncolytic use is not well described. The extent of off-label oral oncolytic use is a concern because the clinical benefits of such use to patients may not outweigh adverse health outcomes or cost concerns. Methods: Prescription data for January 2011 through November 2013 from the St. Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute (MSTI) Oral Chemotherapy program (OCP) was retrospectively analyzed. Use was classified as "on-label" if the cancer site, stage, and line of therapy met the FDA-approved indication. All other uses were classified as "off- label." Off-label use was further evaluated by whether it conformed to and was supported by National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline recommendations. Results: Twelve hundred and six first-fill oral chemotherapy prescriptions were reviewed, representing 990 unique patients and 44 individual medications. On-label use amounted to 71% and off-label use amounted to 29%. Eighty-eight percent of off-label uses were supported by NCCN guideline recommendations. A total of 3.3% of all prescriptions analyzed were for off-label uses not supported by NCCN guideline recommendations. The top five oral chemotherapies prescribed for off-label uses were capecitabine, temozolomide, lenalidomide, abiraterone, and everolimus. Conclusion: Oral chemotherapies are more often used on label than off label in current practice at our community cancer center. The majority of off-label use of oral oncolytics in this study was supported by NCCN guideline recommendations. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.


Morris Z.S.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Cannon D.M.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Morris B.A.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Bentzen So.M.,University of Maryland, Baltimore | Kozak K.R.,Mercy Regional Cancer Center
Journal of Thoracic Oncology | Year: 2015

Introduction: Contralateral lung tumors in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are classified as stage M1a yet may represent hematogenous metastases or synchronous primary tumors. The impact of these tumors on overall survival (OS) is poorly understood. Here, we aim to determine whether NSCLC patients with M1a disease due only to a contralateral tumor nodule exhibit a favorable prognosis relative to other M1a or M1b patients. Methods: Retrospective evaluation of the impact of contralateral tumor nodules on OS in NSCLC stratified by primary tumor size and N stage attained from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database. Results: Of 173,640 patients, 5161 M1a-contra patients were identified. Median and 3-year OS for these patients exceeded that of patients with M1b (p < 0.0001) or other M1a disease (p < 0.0001). Primary tumor size and N stage were strongly associated with OS in M1a-contra patients. Three-year OS demonstrated a delayed convergence between M1a-contra and other M1a patients with primary tumors greater than or equal to 3 cm or mediastinal lymph node involvement. Proportional hazard modeling indicated that T1-2N0-1M1a-contra patients exhibit OS not significantly different (p = 0.258) from that predicted with comparable T and N stage disease plus a second early-stage primary. Conclusions: Contralateral tumors in NSCLC carry a more favorable prognosis than other M1a or M1b disease. Primary tumor size and N stage may help distinguish M1a-contra patients with hematogenous metastasis from those with a synchronous, second primary. © 2015 by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer.


Eichmeyer J.N.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Burnham C.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Sproat P.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute | Tivis R.,Idaho State University | Beck T.M.,St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute
Journal of Genetic Counseling | Year: 2014

Advances in genetics are changing cancer care and requiring institutions to maximize the unique skills of genetics professionals. The identification of genetic syndromes is vital for prevention and management of families with high cancer risks. Despite this, high risk individuals who qualify are often not referred. Genetic counselors could review oncology charts to improve identification. A genetics assessment tool developed by NCI Community Cancer Centers Program was used to perform self-assessment of the genetics program. A weekly report of all new oncology patients was provided to a genetic counselor for chart review. In 2010, 58 % of all eligible patients (n∈=∈152) were offered a genetics evaluation. In 2011 this improved to 70 % (n∈=∈167), which was a statistically significant difference, X 2(1)∈=∈5.13, p∈=∈0.02. By cancer site, ovarian cancer referrals also showed statistically significant improvement, X 2(1)∈=∈6.36, p∈=∈0.01. Breast and colon referrals were improved but not significant. Over 10 months, 129 patients were identified through the chart review program. Three were confirmed to have a genetic mutation for a hereditary cancer syndrome. An average week included review of 73 charts for 10 medical oncologists, 4 radiation oncologists, and 4 pediatric oncologists which generated 60-80 min of work for the genetic counselor. This program improved patient identification and quality, and allowed physicians to become more aware of opportunities for genetic counseling and more patients to receive genetic counseling and testing. © 2013 National Society of Genetic Counselors, Inc.


PubMed | St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of oncology practice | Year: 2014

The 2015 Commission on Cancer standards require that cancer survivors receive an individualized survivorship care plan (SCP). To meet this new standard, St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute (MSTI), with support from the National Community Cancer Centers Program, implemented a successful survivorship model.At MSTI, the patients SCP is prepared in the electronic health record by a registered health information technician. This document is reviewed during an appointment with a nurse practitioner and social worker. The providers dictation is mailed to the primary care physician with the SCP. From August 2011 to Oct 2012, 118 patients with breast cancer were seen for survivorship appointments. Medical record audit and follow-up telephone call were completed to evaluate patient survivorship needs and satisfaction with the appointment. Patient accounts were reviewed for reimbursement.From medical record review, the most common patient concerns were weight management (35%), fatigue (30%), sexuality (27%), anxiety (23%), caregiver stress (17%), and depression (16%). Telephone calls showed high patient satisfaction and understanding. Patients rated the following statements on a Likert scale from 1 (strongly disagree) to 5 (strongly agree): I understand my treatment summary and care plan (88% strongly agree or agree), and I feel the survivorship visit met my survivorship needs (86% strongly agree or agree). At 1 month, 80% of participants were still working on wellness goals. Patient accounts analysis showed revenue covered costs.Survivorship care at MSTI meets new standards, allows for patient engagement and satisfaction, and improves care coordination. Costs are covered by reimbursement.


PubMed | St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute
Type: Review | Journal: The Surgical clinics of North America | Year: 2016

Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) protocols were first introduced to help recovery after colorectal surgery. They have now been applied to multiple surgical specialties, including pancreatic surgery. ERAS protocols in pancreatic surgery have been shown to decrease length of stay and possibly postoperative morbidity.


PubMed | St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology | Year: 2017

183 Background: In 2006 the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) recommended that oncologists discuss infertility as a result of cancer treatment with patients of reproductive age and provide referrals to specialists as needed. Despite these guidelines the majority of cancer centers are not in compliance. Mountain States Tumor Institute (MSTI) piloted a process to improve quality of oncofertility preservation (OP) through identification, documentation, and referral to reproductive specialists.A physician survey in 2010 indicated that perceived barriers to OP discussion were a lack of accessible materials as well as oversight on the part of the provider. Random chart audits of the Quality Oncology Practice Initiative (QOPI) measures (infertility risks discussed prior to treatment and fertility preservation options discussed/referral to a specialist) occurred biannually at that time. To increase awareness of the data chart audits and reporting shifted to quarterly and included all patients that met OP criteria. Additionally, a committee was formed in 2011 to develop patient/provider packets, collaborate with the local reproductive specialists, and create an OP process. The committee established an OP algorithm involving support staff to flag patients of reproductive age at initial medical oncology consultation and utilizing genetic counselors (GC) and social workers (SW) to expedite and facilitate referrals to reproductive specialists. GC/SW were chosen due to sensitivity with psychosocial issues and to share the additional workload. The OP program was launched in October of 2012.Baseline assessment in 2009 revealed MSTI was compliant 6% and 6%. Six months after program initiation the OP measures improved to 47% and 45% respectively. Notably March and April 2013 showed dramatic improvements with 100% and 75% compliance for both OP measures.It is well known that OP has been a challenge for many cancer centers. This multipronged approach is an example of a novel process implementation that demonstrated significant improvement with the QOPI oncofertility measures. Continued work is needed on improving physician documentation and consistency of OP patient identification.


PubMed | St Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology | Year: 2017

203 Background: Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant condition associated with an 80% risk of colorectal cancer, a 60% risk of endometrial cancer, and additional risks for extra-colonic cancers. Amsterdam and Bethesda criteria can be used to identify patients who may be at risk. However, 25% of colon cancer and 65% of endometrial cancer patients with LS will be missed by using family history criteria alone. LS is caused by mutations in mismatch repair genes (MMR): MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, PMS2, and EPCAM. Tumor screening by immunohistochemistry (IHC) is available, and abnormal results can be flagged for more definitive genetic counseling and testing. Recommendations from the 2009 EGAPP (Evaluation of Genomic Applications in Practice and Prevention) Working Group concluded there is sufficient evidence to use this tumor testing for LS, and the screening would provide moderate population benefits. Cost effectiveness studies have shown universal screening detects nearly twice as many cases of LS and is < $25,000 per life year saved.St. Lukes Mountain States Tumor Institute (MSTI) implemented these recommendations in 2012 using a unique strategy: collaborating with a community organization. The Brian Olson Foundation (BOF) strives to prevent(ing) colon cancer through community outreach and education and saving lives by detecting colon cancer as early as possible.These objectives were aligned with the MSTI screening program for LS in Idaho by using BOF funding to eliminate a financial burden to the patient for 12 months.204 specimens were screened for LS using IHC with the following results: 73% normal, 21% abnormal staining for MLH1/PMS2, and 6% abnormal staining for a single protein. Three families were confirmed to have LS after molecular genetic testing, and 6 families have genetic test results pending.Our system had IHC numbers consistent with national data, if not slightly higher. MSTI has elected to continue the program long-term. This kind of collaboration eased the change in practice such that LS screening could become a standard of care in Idaho.

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