St John Clinical Emergency Hospital

Bucharest, Romania

St John Clinical Emergency Hospital

Bucharest, Romania
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Geavlete P.,St John Clinical Emergency Hospital
Journal of medicine and life | Year: 2010

In recent years, urology has seen a real explosion in the development of new technologies. Modern treatment techniques replaced classic therapeutic methods, among which open surgery had an important role. Endourologic therapies led to effective and safe interventions, increased patient comfort and reduced costs. The "Saint John" Emergency Clinical Hospital Department of Urology always intended to align to the new standards of urological treatment including, primarily, minimally invasive techniques, some of them being performed as national premieres. Ureteroscopy is one of them, thus introducing the rigid and semi rigid endoscopes as part of the therapeutic arsenal of our clinic in 1994 and flexible ureteroscopy in 2002. If the targeted pathology was initially limited to stone disease, ureteroscopy currently covers a wide range of affections, being used both for therapeutic but also for diagnostic purposes. Thus, the ureteroscopic approach can diagnose and treat a wide range of upper urinary tract pathologies (lithiasis, tumors, malformations, iatrogenic injuries, etc.). The new technology acquisitions made by our clinic, increased performance, resulting in a complete and fast resolution in many cases, previously implying additional effort from the surgeons. If at first the ureteroscopies' share of daily practice was modest, in recent years it has achieved an extraordinary growth, thus becoming available to both experienced surgeons and young urologists. We believe that our extensive experience in endourological approach is significant and will have a say in the technological developments, which will help both the patients and the practicing urologists.


Geavlete B.,St John Clinical Emergency Hospital | Jecu M.,St John Clinical Emergency Hospital | Multescu R.,St John Clinical Emergency Hospital | Georgescu D.,St John Clinical Emergency Hospital | And 2 more authors.
Journal of medicine and life | Year: 2010

INTRODUCTION: The development of bipolar resection using saline irrigation provided significant improvements in NMIBT treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a newly introduced endoscopic technique, the bipolar transurethral resection in saline-plasma vaporization of bladder tumors (TURis-PVBT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between May and October 2009, 57 consecutive patients presenting papillary bladder tumors larger than 1 cm underwent TURis-PVBT and a 3 months follow-up. Initial tumor biopsy, followed by plasma vaporization of the tumor and biopsies of the tumoral bed were performed in all cases. Complementary treatment was applied according to risk indications. The follow-up protocol included abdominal ultrasonography, cytology and cystoscopy at 3 months. RESULTS: TURis-PVBT was successfully performed in all cases. Multiple tumors were found in 45.6% of the cases and 50.9% of the patients presented tumors larger than 3 cm. The mean tumoral volume was of 11 ml. The mean operative time was of 17 minutes, the mean hemoglobin decrease was of 0.4 g/dl, the mean catheterization period was of 2.5 days and the mean hospital stay was of 3.5 days. The pathological exam diagnosed 57.9% pTa cases, 31.6% pT1 cases and 10.5% pT2 cases. No tumoral base biopsies were positive for malignancy. The recurrence rate at 3 months for the 51 NMIBT patients was of 15.7%. Orthotopic recurrent tumors were encountered in 5.9% of the cases. CONCLUSIONS: TURis-PVBT seems to represent a promising endoscopic treatment alternative for NMIBT patients, with good efficacy, reduced morbidity, fast postoperative recovery and satisfactory follow-up parameters.


Burnei Gh.,Emergency Hospital for Children Maria Sklodowska Curie | Draghici I.,Emergency Hospital for Children Maria Sklodowska Curie | Gavriliu T.,Emergency Hospital for Children Maria Sklodowska Curie | Georgescu I.,Emergency Hospital for Children Maria Sklodowska Curie | And 4 more authors.
Chirurgia (Romania) | Year: 2013

Background: The purpose of our study is to assess primitive and secondary malignant pulmonary tumors in children. The presence of lung tumors in newborns and infants is a point of interest to specialists in pediatric surgery, thoracic surgery and genetics due to the high death rate. The 5-years survival rate communicated by EUROCARE-study is less than 10% for primitive tumors and less than 15% in lung metastases. Materials and Method: We performed a retrospective study which analysed 11 children with pulmonary primary or metastatic tumors admitted in the Pediatric Surgery Department "Prof. Dr. Al. Pesamosca" of the Emergency Clinical Hospital for Children "Maria Sklodowska Curie", Bucharest. The analysed and operated patients underwent surgery by Prof. Dr. Al. Pesamosca and the authors during the period of 1985-2011. In our series there where 4 primitive lung tumors and 7 secondary ones: 8 underwent surgery and 2 died before being operated on. The incidence of primitive pulmonary lung malignancies is higher for females, 3 to 1, and secondary ones are more frequent in males, 6 to 1. Results: Patients with primitive pulmonary malignancies were late diagnosed. Their age ranged between 1 to 6 years; 3 were operated on, out of which 2 died, and 1 operated still survives. The 7 patients with secondary pulmonary malignancies were late diagnosed, too, probably as a consequence of a late diagnosis of the origin tumor. Conclusions: Even if all malignancies require an early diagnosis and treatment, this aim regarding malignant lung tumors is still a desideratum animating all practitioners. Primitive tumors are diagnosed presenting the main clinical manifestation a bronchopulmonary infection. Secondary lung malignancies are usually asymptomatic and are diagnosed when monitoring a patient for a malignancy with another origin. Chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery of malignant primitive tumors or metastatic ones in children remain unsatisfactory because of the late diagnosis and the limited methods of treatment. Nowadays genetics identified the responsible oncogenes for pulmonary blastic explosion and better results could be obtained by genetic surgery. Copyright © Celsius.


PubMed | St John Clinical Emergency Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of medicine and life | Year: 2010

In recent years, urology has seen a real explosion in the development of new technologies. Modern treatment techniques replaced classic therapeutic methods, among which open surgery had an important role. Endourologic therapies led to effective and safe interventions, increased patient comfort and reduced costs. The Saint John Emergency Clinical Hospital Department of Urology always intended to align to the new standards of urological treatment including, primarily, minimally invasive techniques, some of them being performed as national premieres. Ureteroscopy is one of them, thus introducing the rigid and semi rigid endoscopes as part of the therapeutic arsenal of our clinic in 1994 and flexible ureteroscopy in 2002. If the targeted pathology was initially limited to stone disease, ureteroscopy currently covers a wide range of affections, being used both for therapeutic but also for diagnostic purposes. Thus, the ureteroscopic approach can diagnose and treat a wide range of upper urinary tract pathologies (lithiasis, tumors, malformations, iatrogenic injuries, etc.). The new technology acquisitions made by our clinic, increased performance, resulting in a complete and fast resolution in many cases, previously implying additional effort from the surgeons. If at first the ureteroscopies share of daily practice was modest, in recent years it has achieved an extraordinary growth, thus becoming available to both experienced surgeons and young urologists. We believe that our extensive experience in endourological approach is significant and will have a say in the technological developments, which will help both the patients and the practicing urologists.

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