Salzburg, Austria
Salzburg, Austria

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Rid R.,University of Salzburg | Onder K.,University of Salzburg | Hawranek T.,St. Johanns Spital | Laimer M.,St. Johanns Spital | And 4 more authors.
Molecular Immunology | Year: 2010

Because the ascomycete Cladosporium herbarum embodies one of the most important, world-wide occurring fungal species responsible for eliciting typical IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions ranging from rhinitis and ocular symptoms to severe involvement of the lower respiratory tract, a more comprehensive definition of its detailed allergen repertoire is unquestionably of critical medical as well as therapeutic significance. By screening a C. herbarum cDNA library with IgE antibodies pooled from 3 mold-reactive sera, we were able to identify, clone and affinity-purify a novel allergen candidate (29.9 kDa) exhibiting considerable (three-dimensional) homology to the α/β hydrolase fold superfamily. The latter covers a collection of hydrolytic enzymes of widely differing phylogenetic origin as well as catalytic activity (operating in countless biological contexts) that in general exhibit only little sequence similarity yet show a remarkable conservation of structural topology. Our present study (i) characterizes recombinant non-fusion C. herbarum hydrolase as a natively folded, minor mold allergen that displays a prevalence of IgE reactivity of approximately 17% in our in vitro immunoblot experiments, (ii) proposes the existence of several putative (speculatively cross-reactive) ascomycete orthologues as determined via genome-wide in silico predictions, and (iii) finally implies that C. herbarum hydrolase could be included in forthcoming minimal testing sets when fungal allergy is suspected. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Rid R.,University of Salzburg | Onder K.,University of Salzburg | Trost A.,St. Johanns Spital | Bauer J.,St. Johanns Spital | And 10 more authors.
Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology | Year: 2010

Translationally controlled tumour protein (TCTP) is an evolutionarily highly conserved molecule implicated in many processes related to cell cycle progression, proliferation and growth, to the protection against harmful conditions including apoptosis and to the human allergic response. We are showing here that after application of mild oxidative stress, human TCTP relocates from the cytoplasm to the nuclei of HaCaT keratinocytes where it directly associates with the ligand-binding domain of endogenous vitamin D3 receptor (VDR) through its helical domain 2 (AA 71-132). Interestingly, the latter harbours a putative nuclear hormone receptor coregulatory LxxLL-like motif which seems to be involved in the interaction. Moreover, we demonstrate that VDR transcriptionally induces the expression of TCTP by binding to a previously unknown VDR response element within the TCTP promotor. Conversely, ectopically overexpressed TCTP downregulates the amount of VDR on both mRNA as well as protein level. These data, to conclude, suggest a kind of feedback regulation between TCTP and VDR to regulate a variety of (Ca2+ dependent) cellular effects and in this way further underscore the physiological relevance of this novel protein-protein interaction. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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