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Kogarah, Australia

Freeman R.A.,St. George Upper GI Clinic
Obesity research & clinical practice | Year: 2014

OBJECTIVE: The effects of food tolerance (if any) on diet quality several years post-surgery remain unclear. Our study aimed to assess food tolerance and diet quality after three bariatric procedures; adjustable gastric banding (AGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), 2â??4 years post-surgery.METHODS: This prospective, cross-sectional study assessed weight loss, food tolerance and diet quality in 130 subjects (14 obese pre-surgical controls, 13 AGB, 62 SG and 41 RYGBP). Inclusion criteria selected patients who underwent bariatric surgery between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2008, at a single bariatric clinic. Non-parametric tests (Kruksalâ??Wallis and Mannâ??Whitney) along with Spearman's correlation coefficient analysis were used.RESULTS: Superior food tolerance was reported by the control (24.5), SG (24.0) and RYGBP (22.0) groups, compared with the AGB group (15.5; P < 0.001). The control and AGB groups consumed significantly more high-calorie extra foods (9.2 and 7.7 daily serves respectively) compared with the SG (3.4 serves) and RYGBP (4.0 serves) groups. There were several significant correlations between food tolerance and dietary intake including breads and cereals and meat and meat alternatives.CONCLUSION: The control and AGB groups consumed significantly more high-calorie extra foods, a result that was paralleled by poor weight loss and food tolerance outcomes for the AGB group. A significant positive relationship between food tolerance and diet quality was established. Poor food tolerance and thus compromised diet quality need to be considered as post-surgical complications of the AGB procedure. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of Asia Oceania Assoc. for the Study of Obesity. Source


Freeman R.A.,University of Wollongong | Overs S.E.,University of Wollongong | Zarshenas N.,St. George Upper GI Clinic | Walton K.L.,University of Wollongong | Jorgensen J.O.,St. George Upper GI Clinic
Obesity Research and Clinical Practice | Year: 2014

Objective: The effects of food tolerance (if any) on diet quality several years post-surgery remain unclear. Our study aimed to assess food tolerance and diet quality after three bariatric procedures; adjustable gastric banding (AGB), sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), 2-4 years post-surgery. Methods: This prospective, cross-sectional study assessed weight loss, food tolerance and diet quality in 130 subjects (14 obese pre-surgical controls, 13 AGB, 62 SG and 41 RYGBP). Inclusion criteria selected patients who underwent bariatric surgery between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2008, at a single bariatric clinic. Non-parametric tests (Kruksal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney) along with Spearman's correlation coefficient analysis were used. Results: Superior food tolerance was reported by the control (24.5), SG (24.0) and RYGBP (22.0) groups, compared with the AGB group (15.5; P < 0.001) the control and AGB groups consumed significantly more high-calorie extra foods (9.2 and 7.7 daily serves respectively) compared with the SG (3.4 serves) and RYGBP (4.0 serves) groups there were several significant correlations between food tolerance and dietary intake including breads and cereals and meat and meat alternatives. Conclusion: The control and AGB groups consumed significantly more high-calorie extra foods, a result that was paralleled by poor weight loss and food tolerance outcomes for the AGB group. A significant positive relationship between food tolerance and diet quality was established. Poor food tolerance and thus compromised diet quality need to be considered as post-surgical complications of the AGB procedure. Source


Overs S.E.,University of Wollongong | Freeman R.A.,University of Wollongong | Zarshenas N.,St. George Upper GI Clinic | Walton K.L.,University of Wollongong | Jorgensen J.O.,St. George Upper GI Clinic
Obesity Surgery | Year: 2012

Background: To investigate and compare food tolerance and gastrointestinal quality of life following three bariatric procedures approximately 2 to 4 years post-surgery: adjustable gastric banding (AGB), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGBP), and sleeve gastrectomy (SG). A secondary aim was to test for a relationship between food tolerance and gastrointestinal quality of life. Methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study, participants (including pre-surgery controls) completed two questionnaires: a food tolerance questionnaire (n0129) and a Gastrointestinal Quality of Life Index (GIQLI) (n0119). Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were performed, and significance was adjusted using a post-hoc Bonferroni correction. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients were calculated to evaluate the relationship between food tolerance and GIQLI scores. Results: Food tolerance: the control and SG groups produced the highest median scores (24.5 and 24.0, respectively), indicating superior food tolerance. The median score of the AGB group was significantly lower than all other groups (15.5, P<0.001). Gastrointestinal quality of life: the SG group ranked superior, producing the highest median score (120.5), which was significantly greater than the AGB (94.0, P00.005) and control groups (96.0, P00.006). GIQLI scores correlated significantly with food tolerance scores (r00.522, P<0.01). The median excess weight loss was similar in the SG and RYGBP groups (76.3% and 76.5%), with the AGB group significantly lower at 38.2%. Conclusions Food tolerance and gastrointestinal quality of life, 2 to 4 years post-surgery are ostensibly best after SG, followed closely by RYGBP. AGB appears the least effective across these parameters. A significant positive relationship between food tolerance and gastrointestinal quality of life was confirmed. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011. Source

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