Antigonish, Canada

St. Francis Xavier University

www.stfx.ca/
Antigonish, Canada

St. Francis Xavier University is a primarily undergraduate university located in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, Canada. The university brings together 5,100 students from across Canada and around the world in arts, science, business and information systems. It is a member of the U4 League, a group of primarily undergraduate universities in Eastern Canada. Wikipedia.

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Introducing Peter MacKay - former Canadian Attorney General and Minister of Justice, Minister of Defence, and Minister of Foreign Affairs - as guest speaker, Dr Dahdaleh highlighted the Nova Scotian's leadership and principled thinking. "It is all too common for us to take for granted the real leadership it takes to shape the political future of a nation. It takes courage, tenacity and integrity. Peter knows that a government must always decide whether to lift people up to reach their potential or weigh them down with over-regulation and too heavy a tax burden," said Dr Dahdaleh. Guests were joined by leading political figures - including Trade Secretary and President of the Board of Trade Liam Fox, Lord Giddens, Lord Bell and Canadian High Commissioner Janice Charette - to discuss the future of Canada-UK relations in the year in which Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary of Confederation. The Victor Dahdaleh Foundation seeks to strengthen this historic relationship culturally by its ongoing sponsorship of the Canada Gallery at Canada House in London, which celebrates Canadian artists and their work. Also present at the event was Dr Kent MacDonald, president and vice-chancellor of St Francis Xavier University - another institution with which Victor Dahdaleh has close ties. In 2015, Dr Dahdaleh was honoured by the university with a Degree of Doctor honoris causa in Law. And additionally representing the Canadian academic establishment was York University President Designate, Dr Rhonda Lenton. York University is among several academic organisations partnered with the Victor Dahdaleh Foundation to deliver cutting-edge research programmes. In late 2015 the Foundation made a record $20million donation to York to fund the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health , a state-of-the art facility. With The Victor Dahdaleh Foundation's fundamental principle of matching other funds when it considers donations, it has also been an active supporter of McGill University in Montreal, one of the world's leading centres of medical-doctoral research. The Foundation matches the funds for an endowment in perpetuity for 32 scholarships at the university. The awards are aimed at outstanding full-time undergraduates from low-income countries. And last year it also matched a donation to found a new Chair in Neuroscience at the university, building on McGill's world-class research in the study of chronic brain disease. In the UK, the Victor Dahdaleh Foundation partnered with the British Lung Foundation in 2016 to launch a new programme of research into mesothelioma. Research teams from the University of Leicester, Imperial College London and Cambridge University came together under the initiative. The Foundation's £5 million donation matched UK government funding announced earlier in the year. Also in the UK, Victor Dahdaleh is an Honorary Fellow at London School of Economics, where he has funded a range of new schemes and backed a scholarship programme to enable disadvantaged students from overseas to study at the school. The Victor Dahdaleh Foundation's support for education also reaches Africa, where it is a donor to the Northwood African Educational Trust, which manages a school for orphans in northwest Ethiopia. Victor Dahdaleh is the owner and chairman of Dadco, a privately owned investment, manufacturing and trading group established in 1915.


Introducing Peter MacKay - former Canadian Attorney General and Minister of Justice, Minister of Defence, and Minister of Foreign Affairs - as guest speaker, Dr Dahdaleh highlighted the Nova Scotian's leadership and principled thinking. "It is all too common for us to take for granted the real leadership it takes to shape the political future of a nation. It takes courage, tenacity and integrity. Peter knows that a government must always decide whether to lift people up to reach their potential or weigh them down with over-regulation and too heavy a tax burden," said Dr Dahdaleh. Guests were joined by leading political figures - including Trade Secretary and President of the Board of Trade Liam Fox, Lord Giddens, Lord Bell and Canadian High Commissioner Janice Charette - to discuss the future of Canada-UK relations in the year in which Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary of Confederation. The Victor Dahdaleh Foundation seeks to strengthen this historic relationship culturally by its ongoing sponsorship of the Canada Gallery at Canada House in London, which celebrates Canadian artists and their work. Also present at the event was Dr Kent MacDonald, president and vice-chancellor of St Francis Xavier University - another institution with which Victor Dahdaleh has close ties. In 2015, Dr Dahdaleh was honoured by the university with a Degree of Doctor honoris causa in Law. And additionally representing the Canadian academic establishment was York University President Designate, Dr Rhonda Lenton. York University is among several academic organisations partnered with the Victor Dahdaleh Foundation to deliver cutting-edge research programmes. In late 2015 the Foundation made a record $20million donation to York to fund the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health , a state-of-the art facility. With The Victor Dahdaleh Foundation's fundamental principle of matching other funds when it considers donations, it has also been an active supporter of McGill University in Montreal, one of the world's leading centres of medical-doctoral research. The Foundation matches the funds for an endowment in perpetuity for 32 scholarships at the university. The awards are aimed at outstanding full-time undergraduates from low-income countries. And last year it also matched a donation to found a new Chair in Neuroscience at the university, building on McGill's world-class research in the study of chronic brain disease. In the UK, the Victor Dahdaleh Foundation partnered with the British Lung Foundation in 2016 to launch a new programme of research into mesothelioma. Research teams from the University of Leicester, Imperial College London and Cambridge University came together under the initiative. The Foundation's £5 million donation matched UK government funding announced earlier in the year. Also in the UK, Victor Dahdaleh is an Honorary Fellow at London School of Economics, where he has funded a range of new schemes and backed a scholarship programme to enable disadvantaged students from overseas to study at the school. The Victor Dahdaleh Foundation's support for education also reaches Africa, where it is a donor to the Northwood African Educational Trust, which manages a school for orphans in northwest Ethiopia. Victor Dahdaleh is the owner and chairman of Dadco, a privately owned investment, manufacturing and trading group established in 1915.


News Article | May 9, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

Dr Dahdaleh, whose charitable foundation The Victor Dahdaleh Foundation supports a diverse range of causes across education, healthcare and social and economic development, was the President of the Canada-UK Chamber of Commerce from 2004 to 2009. Fellow former President Robert Brant and current President William Swords were also in attendance. Introducing Peter MacKay - former Canadian Attorney General and Minister of Justice, Minister of Defence, and Minister of Foreign Affairs - as guest speaker, Dr Dahdaleh highlighted the Nova Scotian's leadership and principled thinking. "It is all too common for us to take for granted the real leadership it takes to shape the political future of a nation. It takes courage, tenacity and integrity. Peter knows that a government must always decide whether to lift people up to reach their potential or weigh them down with over-regulation and too heavy a tax burden," said Dr Dahdaleh. Guests were joined by leading political figures - including Trade Secretary and President of the Board of Trade Liam Fox, Lord Giddens, Lord Bell and Canadian High Commissioner Janice Charette - to discuss the future of Canada-UK relations in the year in which Canada celebrates its 150th anniversary of Confederation. The Victor Dahdaleh Foundation seeks to strengthen this historic relationship culturally by its ongoing sponsorship of the Canada Gallery at Canada House in London, which celebrates Canadian artists and their work. Also present at the event was Dr Kent MacDonald, president and vice-chancellor of St Francis Xavier University - another institution with which Victor Dahdaleh has close ties. In 2015, Dr Dahdaleh was honoured by the university with a Degree of Doctor honoris causa in Law. And additionally representing the Canadian academic establishment was York University president and vice-chancellor Dr Rhonda Lenton. York University is among several academic organisations partnered with the Victor Dahdaleh Foundation to deliver cutting-edge research programmes. In late 2015 the Foundation made a record $20million donation to York to fund the Dahdaleh Institute for Global Health, a state-of-the art facility. With The Victor Dahdaleh Foundation's fundamental principle of matching other funds when it considers donations, it has also been an active supporter of McGill University in Montreal, one of the world's leading centres of medical-doctoral research. The Foundation matches the funds for an endowment in perpetuity for 32 scholarships at the university. The awards are aimed at outstanding full-time undergraduates from low-income countries. And last year it also matched a donation to found a new Chair in Neuroscience at the university, building on McGill's world-class research in the study of chronic brain disease. In the UK, the Victor Dahdaleh Foundation partnered with the British Lung Foundation in 2016 to launch a new programme of research into mesothelioma. Research teams from the University of Leicester, Imperial College London and Cambridge University came together under the initiative. The Foundation's £5 million donation matched UK government funding announced earlier in the year. Also in the UK, Victor Dahdaleh is an Honorary Fellow at London School of Economics, where he has funded a range of new schemes and backed a scholarship programme to enable disadvantaged students from overseas to study at the school. The Victor Dahdaleh Foundation's support for education also reaches Africa, where it is a donor to the Northwood African Educational Trust, which manages a school for orphans in northwest Ethiopia. Victor Dahdaleh is the owner and chairman of Dadco, a privately owned investment, manufacturing and trading group established in 1915.


Kane D.A.,St. Francis Xavier University
Frontiers in Neuroscience | Year: 2014

Lactate, the conjugate base of lactic acid occurring in aqueous biological fluids, has been derided as a "dead-end" waste product of anaerobic metabolism. Catalyzed by the near-equilibrium enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), the reduction of pyruvate to lactate is thought to serve to regenerate the NAD+ necessary for continued glycolytic flux. Reaction kinetics for LDH imply that lactate oxidation is rarely favored in the tissues of its own production. However, a substantial body of research directly contradicts any notion that LDH invariably operates unidirectionally in vivo. In the current Perspective, a model is forwarded in which the continuousformation and oxidation of lactate serves as a mitochondrial electron shuttle, whereby lactate generated in the cytosol of the cell is oxidized at the mitochondria of the same cell. From this perspective, an intracellular lactate shuttle operates much like the malate-aspartate shuttle; it is also proposed that the two shuttles are necessarily interconnected. Among the requisite features of such a model, significant compartmentalization of LDH, much like the creatine kinase of the PCr shuttle, would facilitate net cellular lactate oxidation under a variety of conditions. © 2014 Kane.


Wyeth R.C.,St. Francis Xavier University
Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience | Year: 2010

Magnetoreception can play a substantial role in long distance navigation by animals. I hypothesize that locomotion guided by a magnetic compass sense could also play a role in short distance navigation. Animals identify mates, prey, or other short distance navigational goals using different sensory modalities (olfaction, vision, audition, etc.) to detect sensory cues associated with those goals. In conditions where these cues become unreliable for navigation (due to flow changes, obstructions, noise interference, etc.), switching to a magnetic compass sense to guide locomotion toward the navigational goals could be beneficial. Using simulations based on known locomotory and flow parameters, I show this strategy has strong theoretical benefits for the nudibranch mollusk Tritonia diomedea navigating toward odor sources in variable flow. A number of other animals may garner similar benefits, particularly slow-moving species in environments with rapidly changing cues relevant for navigation. Faster animals might also benefit from switching to a magnetic compass sense, provided the initial cues used for navigation (acoustic signals, odors, etc.) are intermittent or change rapidly enough that the entire navigation behavior cannot be guided by a continuously detectable cue. Examination of the relative durations of navigational tasks, the persistence of navigational cues, and the stability of both navigators and navigational targets will identify candidates with the appropriate combination of unreliable initial cues and relatively immobile navigational goals for which this hypothetical behavior could be beneficial. Magnetic manipulations can then test whether a switch to a magnetic compass sense occurs. This hypothesis thus provides an alternative when considering the behavioral significance of a magnetic compass sense in animals. © 2010 Wyeth.


Arora V.K.,Environment Canada | Montenegro A.,St. Francis Xavier University
Nature Geoscience | Year: 2011

Afforestation, the conversion of croplands or marginal lands into forests, results in the sequestration of carbon. As a result, afforestation is considered one of the key climate-change mitigation strategies available to governments by the United Nations1. However, forests are also less reflective than croplands, and the absorption of incoming solar radiation is greater over afforested areas. Afforestation can therefore result in net climate warming, particularly at high latitudes2-5. Here, we use a comprehensive Earth system model to assess the climate-change mitigation potential of five afforestation scenarios, with afforestation carried out gradually over a 50-year period. Complete (100%) and partial (50%) afforestation of the area occupied at present by crops leads to a reduced warming of around 0.45 and 0.25 °C respectively, during the period 2081-2100. Temperature benefits associated with more realistic global afforestation efforts, where less than 50% of cropland is converted, are expected to be even smaller, indicating that afforestation is not a substitute for reduced greenhouse-gas emissions. We also show that warming reductions per unit afforested area are around three times higher in the tropics than in the boreal and northern temperate regions, suggesting that avoided deforestation and continued afforestation in the tropics are effective forest-management strategies from a climate perspective. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Murphy J.B.,St. Francis Xavier University
Earth-Science Reviews | Year: 2013

The appinite suite of rocks offers a unique opportunity to study the effect of water on the generation, emplacement and crystallization history of mafic to felsic magma. The suite consists of a group of coeval plutonic and/or hypabyssal rocks, ranging from ultramafic to felsic in composition in which hornblende is the dominant mafic mineral, and typically occurs both as large prismatic phenocrysts and in the finer grained matrix. The suite is also characterized by abundant evidence for mixing and mingling between diverse magma types and variable degrees of contamination by host rock.Field observations corroborate experimental and theoretical studies that the hornblende stability field expands at the expense of olivine and pyroxene with increasing pH2O in the magma. Textures characteristic of appinites are consistent with rapid growth and with experimental evidence for the reduced viscosity of melts allowing efficient migration of ions to the sites of mineral growth.The appinite suite was originally defined in the Paleozoic Caledonide orogen in Scotland, where it occurs as a number of small shallow crustal bodies that were emplaced after the cessation of subduction and in the immediate aftermath of terrane collision and closure of the Iapetus Ocean. The mafic component is thought to have been triggered by asthenospheric upwelling following stab break-off, and magmas produced have both juvenile and sub-continental lithospheric mantle components. Its compositions have affinities with shoshonites. The felsic components include large batholiths that were probably derived by fractional crystallization.Other appinite suites share some, but not all of these characteristics. Appinite suites apparently range in age from Neo-Archean to Recent, and occur at all crustal levels, at depths of up to 40. km. In addition to shoshonites, appinite suites share some similar geochemical features with high-Mg andesites, sanukitoids and adakites. Some common tectonic traits include a tendency to form soon after the cessation of subduction, and the important role of deep crustal faults as conduits for magmas of various compositions to rise towards the surface. These conduits provide the setting for magmas of diverse composition to mix and mingle. Neo-Archean appinites, and their genetic relationship with abundant coeval sanukitoids, have been interpreted as evidence for the existence of some form of plate tectonics at that time.Melting may be triggered by asthenospheric upwelling caused either by slab breakoff (e.g. after terrane or continental collision) or by the generation of a slab window (e.g. where a ridge collides with a subduction zone). Mafic magma may contain a juvenile component, but Nd isotopic data suggest the additional involvement of a sub-continental lithospheric mantle that, in many instances, was previously metasomatized by fluids and magma and was underplated by mafic complexes during subduction. The composition of the mafic magma may vary from one suite to another. In several suites, the mafic magmas have more traditional calc alkalic or tholeiitic affinities and do not share the shoshonitic characteristics of the type area. In addition, in several appinite complexes, felsic magma was formed by crustal anatexis, rather than fractional crystallization. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.


Cuthbertson M.J.,St. Francis Xavier University | Poole P.H.,St. Francis Xavier University
Physical Review Letters | Year: 2011

In simulations of a waterlike model (ST2) that exhibits a liquid-liquid phase transition, we test for the occurrence of a thermodynamic region in which the liquid can be modeled as a two-component mixture. We assign each molecule to one of two species based on the distance to its fifth-nearest neighbor, and evaluate the concentration of each species over a wide range of temperature and density. Our concentration data compare well with mixture-model predictions in a region between the liquid-liquid critical temperature and the temperature of maximum density. Fits of the model to the data in this region yield accurate estimates for the location of the critical point. We also show that the liquid outside the region of density anomalies is poorly modeled as a simple mixture. © 2011 American Physical Society.


Patent
St. Francis Xavier University | Date: 2015-12-01

An emission monitoring system includes at least one gas analyzer for measuring a concentration of a first gas and a concentration of a second gas, a positioning system for determining the location of the at least one gas analyzer when the concentration of the first gas is measured. A method for monitoring emissions at an industrial site and a computer-implemented event detection system applies the steps of detecting the presence of a gas emission event based on a first detection ratio calculated from the measured concentration of the first gas, the measured concentration of the second gas, a background concentration of the first gas and a background concentration of the second gas.


Patent
St. Francis Xavier University | Date: 2012-03-12

A method and system comprising measuring concentrations of first and second isotopologues of a gas of interest within a first cavity that is sealably in contact with a soil location through an inlet membrane, and the first cavity being defined by chamber walls having openings covered by outlet membranes. Reference concentrations of the first and second isotopologues are measured in a second cavity having a closed bottom, the second cavity being defined by chamber walls having openings covered by more outlet membranes. Relative flux of the isotopologues can be calculated using the measured concentrations.

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