Saint Paul, MN, United States

St. Catherine University of Saint Paul

www.stkate.edu
Saint Paul, MN, United States

St. Catherine University is a private Catholic liberal arts university, located in St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States. Prior to attaining university status, the school was known as the College of St. Catherine. Known for years as "the Nation's Largest College for Women," today St. Catherine offers baccalaureate programs for women plus graduate and associate programs for women and men.St. Catherine is the first Catholic college or university in the world to be granted a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, in October 1937. St. Kate's graduates have earned advanced degrees at renowned institutions. This tradition dates back to the first president who regularly dispatched instructors for a term, a summer or an academic year to pursue graduate studies. St. Kate’s has produced Fulbright Scholars as well.St. Kate’s ranks 14th in the "Best Value - Regional Universities " category of the U.S. News & World Report's college rankings. The University retains its ranking - 13th among Midwest Regional Universities — in the 2013 “American’s Best Colleges” guide by U.S. News & World Report. St. Kate’s placed second among Minnesota institutions in its category.The University enrolls more than 5,000 students. It is a leader in recruiting and enrolling minority students and nontraditional-aged students. St. Catherine's Weekend College — now Evening, Weekend, Online Program — was the second such program in the nation and the first in the Upper Midwest. St. Kate’s was also the first private college in the nation to launch an effort to attract, welcome and retain Hmong students — making it home to one of the largest populations of Hmong scholars in the nation. Wikipedia.

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Rhoads J.K.,St. Catherine University of Saint Paul
Journal of Health Economics | Year: 2012

This study is the second to use national survey data to assess the effect of comprehensive state tobacco control programs on adult cigarette smoking. Data are drawn from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (1991-2006) and reveal consistent evidence that these programs have a statistically significant effect to reduce prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults. Simulations indicate that had all states spent the CDC recommended level of funding from 1991 to 2006 then cigarette smoking prevalence would have been 1.40-8.07% lower in 2006, translating to between 635,000 and 3.7 million fewer adult cigarette smokers. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Jones J.M.,St. Catherine University of Saint Paul
Nutrition Journal | Year: 2014

A comprehensive dietary fiber (DF) definition was adopted by the CODEX Alimentarius Commission (CAC) (1) to reflect the current state of knowledge about DF, (2) to recognize that all substances that behave like fiber regardless of how they are produced can be named as DF if they show physiological benefits, and (3) to promote international harmonization for food labeling and food composition tables. This review gives the history and evolution of the state of DF knowledge as looked at by refinements in DF methods and definitions subsequent to the launch of the DF hypothesis. The refinements parallel both interventional and epidemiological research leading to better understanding of the role of DF in contributing to the numerous physiological benefits imparted by all the various digestion resistant carbohydrates. A comparison of the CODEX definition (including its footnote that authorizes the inclusion of polymers with DP 3-9) and approved CODEX Type 1 methods with other existing definitions and methods will point out differences and emphasize the importance of adoption of CODEX-aligned definitions by all jurisdictions. Such harmonization enables comparison of nutrition research, recommendations, food composition tables and nutrition labels the world over. A case will be made that fibers are analogous to vitamins, in that they vary in structure, function and amount needed, but each when present in the right amount contributes to optimal health. Since the intake of DF is significantly below recommended levels throughout the world, the recognition that 'all fibers fit' is an important strategy in bridging the 'fiber gap' by enfranchising and encouraging greater intake of foods with inherent and added DF. Fortifying foods with added DF makes it easier to increase intakes while maintaining calories at recommended levels. © 2014 Jones; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.


Cothran T.,St. Catherine University of Saint Paul
Library and Information Science Research | Year: 2011

Adding the external variables of satisfaction and loyalty to Fred Davis' technology acceptance model (TAM), this study examined the extent to which graduate students perceived Google Scholar to be a resource that is useful and easy to use. A survey of 1141 graduate students at the University of Minnesota asked questions exploring their perceptions of Google Scholar as part of their research process. Seventy-five percent of survey participants had used Google Scholar at least once before, and a statistical analysis of the responses found that perceived usefulness, loyalty, and, to a lesser extent, perceived ease of use, were positively and significantly related to the graduate students' intended use of the information resource. This research showed that TAM is an applicable model for predicting graduate student use of Google Scholar, which can help academic librarians seeking to understand graduate student acceptance of new information sources. Additionally, this study provides information about how librarians might best promote Google Scholar and other library resources to graduate students. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.


Haggerty L.L.,St. Catherine University of Saint Paul
Breastfeeding Medicine | Year: 2011

Current research links newborn and infant vitamin D deficiency with various clinical outcomes, including rickets, failure to thrive, type 1 diabetes, and other immune-related diseases. Breastfed infants are often at a greater risk of developing deficiency due to their mothers' low vitamin D status. Human milk reflects the vitamin D status of the mother and often contains inadequate levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D for infant nutrition. In 2008 the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommended 400IU of vitamin D supplementation of all infants. However, research has indicated low levels of compliance of vitamin D supplementation of breastfed infants and a high incidence of vitamin D deficiency in the United States. Many breastfeeding advocates believe that the AAP's recommendations undermine breastfeeding, implying that human milk is inadequate for infant nutrition. Lactating mothers are also reluctant to add any supplements to their breastmilk. The literature review will examine the effectiveness and safety of maternal vitamin D supplementation for prevention and/or treatment of vitamin D deficiency in breastfed infants and lactating mothers. This method of prevention and intervention provides pediatric providers and certified lactation consultants with an alternative approach for education, counseling, promotion of breastfeeding, and treatment to improve maternal and infant health. © 2011 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: ECOSYSTEM STUDIES | Award Amount: 393.26K | Year: 2014

A lot of scientific effort is now being focused on how plants and animals will respond to a warming climate. This is critically important, but very difficult because there are many other global changes occurring at the same time. For example, humans have widely spread large amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus, which are important fertilizers. But what effects excess nutrients that are deposited mainly on land but then wash into aquatic ecosystems will have as the world warms is not clear. So studies are needed that examine how multiple global changes like these interact at the same time. The goal of this research project is to explore how freshwater ecosystems respond to warming and nutrient enrichment simultaneously. The research is important because nutrient enrichment may drastically alter the effects of warming on streams and rivers and so the results should be useful as society tries to adapt to warmer conditions. Results will also inform ecological theory that attempts to use basic principles for understanding how species and ecosystems may respond to global change. An education program will be an integral part of this project and will include the development of film documentaries, student podcasts, and the more traditional training of undergraduate and graduate students, as well as research technicians.

This project will be conducted in a geothermally active region of southwestern Iceland, where streams exhibit a wide range in ambient temperature without significant differences in background chemistry that would otherwise influence results. The research team will use the differences in natural temperature between streams to examine how nutrient supply and temperature together influence the ecology of streams and rivers. The first objective is to quantify effects of warming and nutrients on the origin and fate of carbon and nitrogen (e.g., ecosystem productivity, nutrient uptake, and nitrogen-fixation). The team will then combine ecosystem-scale nitrogen and phosphorus additions with controlled streamside channel experiments to examine how the influence of warming on the ecology of streams and rivers is affected by nutrient supply, and whether short-term responses to warming differ from those observed in natural ecosystems over longer periods. Responses of these ecosystem-level processes should also shape how energy and materials flow through food webs from algae to trout. The second objective is to quantify the interactive effects of temperature and nutrients on the routes of energy and materials through river and stream food webs. Food web responses to nutrients between streams of varying temperatures will be tracked using a combination of stable (i.e., non-radioactive) isotope tracer additions, secondary production measurements, and flow food web analyses. This research will provide much needed information about how two dominant global change drivers, warming and nutrient enrichment, interact to influence biodiversity and ecosystem function in an important freshwater habitat.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: CCLI-Type 1 (Exploratory) | Award Amount: 199.04K | Year: 2010

The Nations two-year colleges (2YCs) educate a substantial and rapidly growing number of undergraduate students, including a significant number of students in STEM fields. Furthermore, the racial, ethnic, and geographic diversity of students served by 2YCs make these institutions key entry points to STEM fields for students who have been historically underrepresented. While 2YCs serve large numbers of STEM students, the number of NSF Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) proposals from and awards to these institutions remains disproportionately low.

This project is developing and implementing a grant writing workshop and mentoring program for STEM faculty from 2YCs. Project components are designed to address the barriers to participation in CCLI faced by 2YC faculty and, as such, to address the disproportionately small number of CCLI awards made to these institutions. The overall goals of the project are to broaden awareness of the CCLI program as a resource for 2YCs and to increase the number of CCLI awards to these institutions. A specific focus of the project is on faculty from rural 2YCs that have not had previous NSF funding. By enhancing participation of target faculty in the CCLI program, the project is directly impacting 2YC faculty and students through improved curricula, pedagogy, and instrumentation. Furthermore, by broadening the CCLI community to include institutions not previously represented, the project is seeking to further facilitate collaboration between 2YCs and the broader undergraduate STEM community.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: S-STEM:SCHLR SCI TECH ENG&MATH | Award Amount: 600.00K | Year: 2011

This project continues and expands a previous S-STEM project to further encourage students to persist in completion of degrees in STEM. The College of St. Catherine, a womens college in Minnesota, identified several barriers to persistence in STEM majors among their S-STEM Scholars. Accordingly, they structured the program to identify individual scholars as diamonds in the rough (entering first-year students), continuing (previous scholars whose records allow them to retain their scholarships), late comers (students who enter undeclared or considering non-STEM majors, but who later decide to pursue a STEM major), and tenacity (students whose records prevent them from being in the continuing category, but who demonstrate a love of their major discipline despite their academic difficulty). Each group of students is offered a different combination of support from scholarship funds, tutoring, and specially designed courses that use science applications in the teaching of mathematics. Already dealing with an exclusively female student population with financial need, the new program is establishing contacts within two predominant immigrant communities in the area, the Hmong and Somali, and actively recruiting these underrepresented student groups into the scholarship program. Over the course of the five-year project, at least 65 scholarships will have been awarded. Graduates of St. Catherines have succeeded in entering and completing graduate programs and in the workforce. Thus this project plays a major role in expanding access to STEM careers.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 201.79K | Year: 2011

With this award from the Major Research Instrumentation (MRI) Program, Professor Daron Janzen from College of St Catherine and colleagues Steven Drew (Carleton College), Ted Pappenfus (U Minnesota Morris), James Wollack (College of St Catherine) and Alicia Peterson (College of Saint Benedict) will acquire a benchtop X-ray diffractometer that will serve a consortium of schools. The award will enhance research training and education at all levels, especially in areas such as (a) vapochromic sensor materials, (b) organic materials for use in bulk heterojunction solar cells, and (c) dechlorination of environmental pollutants.

An X-ray diffractometer allows accurate and precise measurements of the full three dimensional structure of a molecule, including bond distances and angles, and provides accurate information about the spatial arrangement of a molecule relative to neighboring molecules. The studies described here will impact a number of areas, including organic and inorganic chemistry, materials chemistry and biochemistry. This instrument will be an integral part of teaching as well as research at a consortium of institutions that include the College of St. Catherine, Carleton College, University of Minnesota at Morris and the College of Saint Benedict and Saint Johns University.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 99.99K | Year: 2012

This award is providing partial support to convene the Annual Conference and Partners Meeting of the Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program, being held July 15-20, 2012 in Minneapolis, MN. St. Catherine University and the National Center for STEM Elementary Education are hosts of the meeting. The theme of this years GLOBE Annual Conference is: GLOBE and STEM: Building a Global Community of Citizen Scientists. It is anticipated that approximately 150 attendees from across the 113 U.S. Partners and 111 Partner Countries will attend the 2012 meeting. Specific activities to be undertaken at the meeting include: training in the use of selected GLOBE protocols; training in the use of the new GLOBE community web site for data entry and analysis (scheduled for release in June, 2012); discussing major themes related to GLOBE activities and STEM education, both locally and globally; exploring the interface of GLOBE and American Sign Language; and GLOBE community networking and sharing of resources.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: TUES-Central Resource Project | Award Amount: 200.00K | Year: 2011

The Nations two-year colleges (2YCs) educate a substantial and rapidly growing number of undergraduate students, including a significant number of students in STEM fields. Furthermore, the racial, ethnic, and geographic diversity of students served by 2YCs make these institutions key entry points to STEM fields for students who have been historically underrepresented.

The Transforming Undergraduate Education in STEM of Two-Year Colleges (TUESTYC) project is developing and implementing a grant writing workshop and mentoring program for STEM faculty from 2YCs. Project components are designed to address the barriers to participation in TUES program faced by 2YC faculty. The overall goals of the project are to broaden awareness of the TUES program as a resource for 2YCs and to increase the number of TUES awards to these institutions. This project is extending the work of two previous projects by specifically targeting faculty from the disciplines of biology, engineering, and physics/astronomy. By enhancing participation of target faculty in the TUES program, the project is directly impacting 2YC faculty and students through improved curricula, pedagogy, and instrumentation. Furthermore, by broadening the TUES community to include institutions not previously represented, the project is seeking to further facilitate collaboration between 2YCs and the broader undergraduate STEM community.

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