St Antonius Center For Platelet Function Research

Nieuwegein, Netherlands

St Antonius Center For Platelet Function Research

Nieuwegein, Netherlands

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Breet N.J.,St Antonius Hospital | Breet N.J.,St Antonius Center for Platelet Function research | de Jong C.,St Antonius Center for Platelet Function research | Bos W.J.,St Antonius Hospital | And 13 more authors.
Thrombosis and Haemostasis | Year: 2014

Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have suggested that patients with CKD have less therapeutic benefit of antiplatelet therapy. However, the relation between renal function and platelet reactivity is still under debate. On-treatment platelet reactivity was determined in parallel by ADP- and AA-induced light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) and the VerifyNow® System (P2Y12 and Aspirin) in 988 patients on dual antiplatelet therapy, undergoing elective coronary stenting. Patients were divided into two groups according to the presence or absence of moderate/severe CKD (GFR<60 ml/min/1.73 m2). Furthermore, the incidence of all-cause death, non-fatal acute myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis and stroke at one-year was evaluated. Patients with CKD (n=180) had significantly higher platelet reactivity, regardless of the platelet function test used. Patients with CKD more frequently had high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (HCPR) and high on-aspirin platelet reactivity (HAPR) regardless of the platelet function test used. After adjustment for potential confounders, this was no longer significant. The event-rate was the highest in patients with both high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) and CKD compared to those with neither high on-treatment platelet reactivity nor CKD. In conclusion, the magnitude of platelet reactivity as well as the incidence of HPR was higher in patients with CKD. However, since the incidence of HPR was similar after adjustment, a higher rate of co-morbidities in patients with CKD might be the major cause for this observation rather than CKD itself. CKD-patients with HCPR were at the highest risk of long-term cardiovascular events. © Schattauer 2014.


Breet N.J.,St Antonius Hospital | Breet N.J.,St Antonius Center for Platelet Function Research | Van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius Hospital | Van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius Center for Platelet Function Research | And 6 more authors.
Expert Opinion on Medical Diagnostics | Year: 2010

Importance of the field: The individual response to clopidogrel therapy is unpredictable, resulting in high on-treatment platelet reactivity in a substantial number of patients. Moreover, consistent findings across multiple investigations point out that a strong relationship exists between high on-treatment platelet reactivity and the occurrence of atherothrombotic events. Areas covered in this review: This paper describes the current available methods of platelet function evaluation, including their advantages and drawbacks, reviews the evidence for the relation between high on-treatment platelet reactivity and clinical outcome, and discusses data concerning the clinical implications of platelet function testing in patients treated with thienopyridine therapy. What the reader will gain: The reader will be introduced to platelet function testing and its clinical applicability. The reader will gain a better understanding of the techniques used and will learn how to interpret the numerous data on platelet function testing and clinical outcome. Take home message: Although a growing body of evidence demonstrates the promising potential of platelet function tests in predicting atherothrombotic events post stenting, platelet function testing should not yet be used routinely, as adequate treatment of high on-treatment platelet reactivity is unknown. © 2010 Informa UK Ltd.


Breet N.J.,St Antonius Hospital | Breet N.J.,St Antonius Center For Platelet Function Research | Van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius Hospital | Van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius Center For Platelet Function Research | And 17 more authors.
JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association | Year: 2010

Context: High on-treatment platelet reactivity is associated with atherothrombotic events following coronary stent implantation. Objective: To evaluate the capability of multiple platelet function tests to predict clinical outcome. Design, Setting, and Patients: Prospective, observational, single-center cohort study of 1069 consecutive patients taking clopidogrel undergoing elective coronary stent implantation between December 2005 and December 2007. On-treatment platelet reactivity was measured in parallel by light transmittance aggregometry, VerifyNow P2Y12 and Plateletworks assays, and the IMPACT-R and the platelet function analysis system (PFA-100) (with the Dade PFA collagen/adenosine diphosphate [ADP] cartridge and Innovance PFA P2Y). Cut-off values for high on-treatment platelet reactivity were established by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Main Outcome Measurement: The primary end point was defined as a composite of all-cause death, nonfatal acute myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis, and ischemic stroke. The primary safety end point included TIMI (Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction) criteria major and minor bleeding. Results: At 1-year follow-up, the primary end point occurred more frequently in patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity when assessed by light transmittance aggregometry (11.7%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 8.9%-15.0% vs 6.0%; 95% CI, 4.2%-8.2%; P<.001), VerifyNow (13.3%; 95% CI, 10.2%-17.0% vs 5.7%; 95% CI, 4.1%-7.8%; P<.001) and Plateletworks (12.6%; 95% CI, 8.8%-17.2% vs 6.1%; 95% CI, 3.8%-9.2%; P=.005), which also had modest ability to discriminate between patients having and not having a primary event: light transmittance aggregometry (area under the curve [AUC], 0.63; 95% CI, 0.58-0.68), VerifyNow (AUC, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.57-0.67), and Plateletworks (AUC, 0.61; 95% CI, 0.53-0.69). The IMPACT-R, Dade PFA collagen/ADP, and Innovance PFA P2Y were unable to discriminate between patients with and without primary end point at 1-year follow-up (all AUCs included 0.50 in the CI). None of the tests identified patients at risk for bleeding. Conclusions: Of the platelet function tests assessed, only light transmittance aggregometry, VerifyNow, and Plateletworks were significantly associated with the primary end point. However, the predictive accuracy of these tests was only modest. None of the tests provided accurate prognostic information to identify low-risk patients at higher risk of bleeding following stent implantation. Trial Registration: clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00352014. ©2010 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.


Breet N.J.,St Antonius Hospital | Breet N.J.,St Antonius Center For Platelet Function Research | van Donkersgoed H.E.,St Antonius Center For Platelet Function Research | van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius Hospital | And 9 more authors.
Netherlands Heart Journal | Year: 2011

Background The TRITON-TIMI 38 study has identified three subgroups of patients with a higher risk of bleeding during treatment with the thienopyridine prasugrel: patients with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack (TIA), patients ≥75 years and patients with a body weight <60 kg. However, the underlying pathobiology leading to this increased bleeding risk remains to be elucidated. The higher bleeding rate may be due to a stronger prasugrelinduced inhibition of platelet aggregation in these subgroups. The aim of the present study was to determine whether on-treatment platelet reactivity is lower in these risk subgroups as compared with other patients in a large cohort on the thienopyridine clopidogrel undergoing elective coronary stenting. Methods A total of 1069 consecutive patients were enrolled. On-clopidogrel platelet reactivity was measured in parallel by light transmittance aggregometry, the Verify- Now® P2Y12 assay and the PFA-100 collagen/ADP cartridge. Results Fourteen patients (1.5%) had a prior history of stroke or TIA, 138 patients (14.5%) were older than 75 years and 30 patients (3.2%) had a body weight <60 kg. Age ≥75 years and a history of stroke were independent predictors of a higher on-treatment platelet reactivity. In contrast, a body weight <60 kg was significantly associated with a lower on-treatment platelet reactivity. Conclusion In two high-risk subgroups for bleeding, patients ≥75 years and patients with previous stroke, onclopidogrel platelet reactivity is increased. In contrast, in patients with a low body weight, on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity is decreased, suggesting that a stronger response to a thienopyridine might only lead to more bleeds in patients with low body weight. © The Author(s) 2011.


van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius Hospital | van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius center for platelet function research | Bouman H.J.,St Antonius Hospital | Bouman H.J.,St Antonius center for platelet function research | And 6 more authors.
Thrombosis Research | Year: 2010

Introduction: High on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity has been associated with an increased risk for atherothrombotic events. A new player on the horizon is the IMPACT-R ADP-test using ADP pre-stimulation. We here report the results of a thorough evaluation of this new device. Materials and methods: The IMPACT-R ADP-test was evaluated in different categories of subjects. First, normal range values were determined in healthy subjects (n = 46). Second, the effect of 600 mg of clopidogrel was evaluated with the IMPACT-R ADP-test and two other well-validated methods (flowcytometric VASP-analysis and optical aggregometry) in 21 patients. Third, a head-to-head comparison between the IMPACT-R ADP-test and optical aggregometry was performed in a large cohort of patients on dual antiplatelet therapy. Results: The results of the IMPACT-R ADP-test were highly variable throughout healthy subjects. The administration of a high clopidogrel loading dose resulted in a small but significant increase in surface coverage but 61.9% of the patients were still identified as clopidogrel nonresponder. In contrast, optical aggregometry and VASP-analysis identified 24% and 33% of these patients as a clopidogrel nonresponder, respectively. Head-to-head comparison with optical aggregometry in 451 patients showed only a modest correlation between both methods (r ∼ 0.20, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: The IMPACT-R ADP-test is relatively insensitive to the effects of clopidogrel and cannot substitute for methods such as flowcytometric VASP-analysis and optical aggregometry. Further studies are required to establish the clinical usefulness of IMPACT-R ADP-test to accurately predict the occurrence of major adverse cardiovascular events in patients with high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity before it can be implemented in clinical practice. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


Breet N.J.,St Antonius Hospital | Breet N.J.,St Antonius Center for Platelet Function Research | Van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius Hospital | Van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius Center for Platelet Function Research | And 8 more authors.
Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis | Year: 2010

Background: High on-aspirin platelet reactivity (HAPR) is associated with atherothrombotic events following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The aim of the present study was to identify the platelet function test sensitive for platelet cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition that best predicts atherothrombotic events. Methods and results: Nine hundred and fifty-one consecutive patients on dual antiplatelet therapy undergoing elective PCI were enrolled. On-aspirin platelet reactivity was measured in parallel by arachidonic acid (AA)-induced light transmittance aggregometry (AA-induced LTA), the VerifyNow® Aspirin Assay (VerifyNow® Aspirin Assay), the arachidonic acid prestimulated IMPACT-R (IMPACT-R AA) and the PFA-100 collagen/epinephrine cartridge (PFA COL/EPI). Cut-offs for HAPR were established by receiveroperator characteristic curve analysis. At 1-year follow-up, the composite of all-cause death, non-fatal acute myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis and ischemic stroke occurred more frequently in patients with HAPR when assessed by LTA [10.1% vs. 6.0%, P = 0.020 (n = 925)] and VerifyNow® [13.3%vs. 5.9%, P = 0.015 (n = 422)].The VerifyNow® ASA assay (AUC = 0.78) and, to a lesser extent, AA-induced LTA (AUC = 0.73) added significantly to a model consisting of clinical and procedural risk factors in predicting atherothrombotic events. In contrast, the IMPACT-R (n = 791) and the PFA Collagen/Epinephrine (n = 719) were unable to discriminate between patients with and without primary endpoint at 1-year follow-up. None of the platelet function tests was able to identify patients at risk for bleeding. Conclusions: AA-induced LTA and the VerifyNow® ASA test were able to identify aspirin-treated patients undergoing PCIwith stenting at risk for atherothrombotic events. The VerifyNow® Aspirin Assay had the highest predictive accuracy. None of the tests was able to identify patients at higher risk of bleeding. © 2010 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.


Breet N.J.,St Antonius Hospital | Breet N.J.,St Antonius Center For Platelet Function Research | Van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius Hospital | Van Werkum J.W.,St Antonius Center For Platelet Function Research | And 9 more authors.
Heart | Year: 2011

Aim: High on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (HCPR) and high on-aspirin platelet reactivity (HAPR) are associated with atherothrombotic events following coronary stenting. There are, however, few data concerning high on-treatment platelet reactivity to both aspirin and clopidogrel simultaneously. The aim of the present study was to determine the incidence of dual high on-treatment platelet reactivity (DAPR) and its impact on clinical outcome. Methods: On-treatment platelet reactivity was measured in parallel by ADP- and arachidonic acid-induced light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) (n=921) and the point-of-care VerifyNow system (P2Y12 and aspirin) (n=422) in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy undergoing elective stent implantation. HCPR and HAPR were established by receiver-operator characteristic curve analysis. The primary endpoint was a composite of all-cause death, non-fatal acute myocardial infarction, stent thrombosis and ischaemic stroke at 1-year follow-up. Results: The incidence of DAPR varied between 14.7% and 26.9% depending on the platelet function test used. DAPR, assessed by LTA and the VerifyNow system, was highly associated with an adverse clinical outcome. At 1-year follow-up the primary endpoint occurred more frequently in patients with isolated HCPR (11.7%), isolated HAPR (9.6%) or DAPR (10.7%) compared with patients without high on-treatment platelet reactivity (4.2%, all p<0.01) when platelet function was evaluated with LTA. Using the VerifyNow system, patients exhibiting DAPR had the highest risk for the primary endpoint (17.7% vs 4.1% in patients without high on-treatment platelet reactivity, p=0.001). Conclusions: In patients undergoing elective percutaneous coronary intervention, DAPR to aspirin and clopidogrel is present in one in five patients and is associated with a high risk for atherothrombotic events. DAPR measured by the point-of-care VerifyNow system has a higher predictability for atherothrombotic events than LTA. Clinical Trial Registration Information: www.clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00352014.

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