Warsaw, Poland
Warsaw, Poland

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Sobocki J.,St Anna Memorial Hospital | Nowakowski M.,St Anna Memorial Hospital | Herman R.M.,St Anna Memorial Hospital | Walega P.,Jagiellonian University | And 4 more authors.
Surgical Innovation | Year: 2015

Background. Modulation of the enteric nervous system seems to be promising in several functional colorectal disorders for which targeted, causal treatment methods do not exist. However, sacral nerve stimulation can induce undesirable muscle contraction or paresthesia. Therefore, we have developed a laparoscopic technique for implanting a neural electrode, placed directly over the pelvic autonomic nerve plexus. The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of stimulating the hypogastric plexus and pelvic nerves on inducing distal colon contraction, defecation, and micturition. Method. A total of 10 white, male healthy pigs (25-30 kg) were subjected to the laparoscopic implantation of the electrode and the stimulator. In the third and fourth weeks postimplantation, the efficacy of the acute and chronic stimulation to induce defecation was evaluated. Results. The average operative time was 105 minutes (85-150 minutes). In all pigs, acute stimulation activated induced defecation, every second day, every time on demand, with an average delay of 139.7 s. Micturition was induced incidentally. Acute or chronic stimulation did not cause any harm, pain, or suffering to the animals. No adverse effects of the stimulation were observed, and no septic complications or macroscopic fibrosis around the electrodes were found on autopsy. Conclusion. Hypogastric plexus stimulation can be a useful and safe option of distal colon contraction, defecation, and micturition. However, the efficacy of the stimulation was observed for a relatively short period of time, and it is not known if it will be sustained for a longer duration. © The Author(s) 2014.


Sobocki J.,St Anna Memorial Hospital | Herman R.M.,Jagiellonian University | Fraczek M.,Medical University of Warsaw
Obesity Surgery | Year: 2013

Background: Autonomic and vagal neuromodulation has been suggested for the treatment of morbid obesity. Occipital nerves remain in close anatomical relation to vagal nerve roots at the entrance to medulla oblongata. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of C1-C2 occipital neuromodulation on autonomic activity, body mass, and composition. Methods: Five obese patients were included in the study (three women and two men, BMI 43-49, average age 43.3, range 24-55). Two electrodes were placed bilaterally in the C1-C2 region subcutaneously under local anesthesia. Stimulation was started 24 h after implantation and continued for 8 weeks. Patients activated stimulators for 12 h every day and turned the stimulators off at night. No other treatment including diet or change in lifestyle was introduced during the study. The following parameters were evaluated: body mass (0, 4th, and 8th week), body composition (bioimpedance study), food intake, quality of life, and heart rate variability (HRV) (0 and 8th week). Results: No adverse events were observed in this group. One patient reported amelioration of constipation and one reported two incidents of salivation. The average body mass decrease was 5.6 kg in 4 weeks and 8.7 kg in 8 weeks. Body composition study showed a 2-month decrease in body fat of 7.9 kg on average. HRV revealed increased parasympathetic tone (LF/HF 4.4 ± 4.3 SD vs. 1.6 ± 1.7 SD). Conclusions: C1-C2 occipital stimulation seems being capable of decreasing body mass and affecting a positive shift in body composition and significantly increases the activity of the autonomic nervous system. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media New York.


PubMed | St Anna Memorial Hospital, Medical University of Warsaw, Jagiellonian University and Agricultural University of Krakow
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Surgical innovation | Year: 2015

Modulation of the enteric nervous system seems to be promising in several functional colorectal disorders for which targeted, causal treatment methods do not exist. However, sacral nerve stimulation can induce undesirable muscle contraction or paresthesia. Therefore, we have developed a laparoscopic technique for implanting a neural electrode, placed directly over the pelvic autonomic nerve plexus. The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the effect of stimulating the hypogastric plexus and pelvic nerves on inducing distal colon contraction, defecation, and micturition.A total of 10 white, male healthy pigs (25-30 kg) were subjected to the laparoscopic implantation of the electrode and the stimulator. In the third and fourth weeks postimplantation, the efficacy of the acute and chronic stimulation to induce defecation was evaluated.The average operative time was 105 minutes (85-150 minutes). In all pigs, acute stimulation activated induced defecation, every second day, every time on demand, with an average delay of 139.7 s. Micturition was induced incidentally. Acute or chronic stimulation did not cause any harm, pain, or suffering to the animals. No adverse effects of the stimulation were observed, and no septic complications or macroscopic fibrosis around the electrodes were found on autopsy.Hypogastric plexus stimulation can be a useful and safe option of distal colon contraction, defecation, and micturition. However, the efficacy of the stimulation was observed for a relatively short period of time, and it is not known if it will be sustained for a longer duration.

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