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Guanghe Chengguanzhen, China

Lambertsen L.M.,Statens Serum Institute | Ingels H.,Statens Serum Institute | Schonheyder H.C.,University of Aalborg | Hoffmann S.,Statens Serum Institute | And 3 more authors.
Clinical Microbiology and Infection | Year: 2014

The aim of this work was to describe national surveillance of invasive beta-haemolytic streptococci (BHS) in Denmark and to report overall trends and major findings by groups and types of BHS causing laboratory-confirmed disease from 2005 to 2011. A total of 3063 BHS isolates were received from 2872 patients. Based on confirmed cases the overall annual incidence increased from 6.2 to 8.9 per 100 000 persons between 2005 and 2011. In 2011 the incidences of group A, B, C and G streptococci were 3.1, 2.3, 0.9 and 2.6 per 100 000 persons, respectively. An increase was observed for all groups of BHS, but in particular for group G in men above 65 years of age. Among group A streptococci (GAS), five T-types (1, 28,12, 3,13,B3264 and B3264) represented 71% and five emm-types (1, 28, 3, 89 and 12) 76% of all isolates. Among group B streptococci (GBS) four types (III, Ia, V, Ib) represented 79% of the isolates. Potential coverage for future vaccines against GAS and GBS disease was 76% compared with the 26-valent GAS vaccine and 89% based on GBS serotypes Ia, Ib, II, III and V. The number of reported cases of invasive BHS disease increased in Denmark from 2005 to 2011. Nationwide laboratory-based surveillance of BHS is required to monitor epidemiological changes, explore potential outbreaks and determine potential vaccine coverage. © 2013 The Authors. Source


Trademark
Ssi | Date: 2015-10-29

All-purpose cleaners.


News Article | December 2, 2015
Site: http://www.techtimes.com/rss/sections/environment.xml

In the wake of the recent terrorist attacks in Paris and the ongoing 11-day international climate change summit, the Paris municipal police deployed an Israeli-made surveillance balloon to help keep approximately 200 delegates safe. The Skystar 180 aerostat was leased from the French company Group SSI and Yavne-based RT Systems, who manufactured the system used for surveillance, intelligence, communications and reconnaissance. Skystar 180 looks over Paris and provides public security services and midrange surveillance to the French police. It can fly up to 1,000 feet in altitude and operate for approximately 72 hours straight. "By providing an elevated platform, well above the field of operation, the system offers an indispensable, dominating view of the scene below," wrote RT Systems on its website. The Israeli company stressed the importance of a persistent reconnaissance system that is built for high-risk situations where enemies can operate in secret within a hostile civilian environment. The Skystar 180's 360-degree functionality make it capable of providing automatic scans and high-quality surveillance. It can last aloft up to three days straight and requires only a brief 20-minute break for re-inflation after a 72-hour stint. It leaves a small logistical footprint compared with other surveillance systems. Skystar 180 is also easy to operate and cost-effective, the company notes. The helium-inflated balloon measures 19.5 feet and is very mobile. The Skystar 180 is fastened to a portable control station on ground where the surveillance data and video are processed. The Israeli-made Triple Sensor LRF Stabilized Miniature Payload (TR-STAMP) is also being utilized. TR-STAMP uses its triple sensor (CCD TV, infra-red and laser rangefinder) electro-optical system to provide "over-the-hill" tactical scouting images. Paris is host to the 21st United Nations Climate Change Conference, an 11-day assembly attended by many of the world's top leaders. The conference kicked off on Nov. 30 and will conclude on Dec. 11. The goal is to arrive at a legally binding agreement to address climate change and keep the global warming levels from exceeding 2 degrees Celsius by 2050. The French capital was swept by a series of terrorist attacks at various locations on Nov. 13, leaving 130 people dead and over 360 people injured. Extremist group ISIL or Islamic State declared responsibility for the series of coordinated attacks. Russia has already classified the extremist group as a terrorist organization in the country.


News Article
Site: http://news.yahoo.com/energy/

In this Friday, Oct. 9, 2015, photo, Glen Mead operates a line drill machine at a rock quarry, in Montrose, Pa. Mead spent his life working as a dairy farmer and at age 60, began working with Rock Ridge Stone in Montrose, to make ends meet. For just the third time in 40 years, millions of Social Security recipients, disabled veterans and federal retirees can expect no increase in benefits next year, unwelcome news for more than one-fifth of the nation's population. (AP Photo/Brett Carlsen) More WASHINGTON (AP) — For just the third time in 40 years, millions of Social Security recipients, disabled veterans and federal retirees can expect no increase in benefits next year, unwelcome news for more than one-fifth of the nation's population. By law, the annual cost-of-living adjustment, or COLA, is based on a government measure of inflation, which is being dragged down by lower prices at the pump. The government is scheduled to announce the COLA — or lack of one — on Thursday, when it releases the Consumer Price Index for September. Inflation has been so low this year that economists say there is little chance the September numbers will produce a benefit increase for next year. Prices actually have dropped from a year ago, according to the inflation measure used for the COLA. "It's a very high probability that it will be zero," said economist Polina Vlasenko, a research fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research. "Other prices — other than energy — would have to jump. It would have to be a very sizable increase that would be visible, and I don't think that's happened." Congress enacted automatic increases for Social Security beneficiaries in 1975, when inflation was high and there was a lot of pressure to regularly raise benefits. Since then, increases have averaged 4 percent a year. Only twice before, in 2010 and 2011, have there been no increases. In all, the COLA affects payments to more than 70 million Americans. Almost 60 million retirees, disabled workers, spouses and children get Social Security benefits. The average monthly payment is $1,224. The COLA also affects benefits for about 4 million disabled veterans, 2.5 million federal retirees and their survivors, and more than 8 million people who get Supplemental Security Income, the disability program for the poor. Many people who get SSI also receive Social Security. Carol Mead of Montrose, Pennsylvania, said she and her husband were counting on Social Security COLA to help them with their finances. "My husband is working just so we can pay our bills," said Mead, a retired land-use administrator. "He's 70 years old, and he's still working in a stone quarry. He's told me a number of times that he thinks he's going to have to work until the day he dies." More bad news: The lack of a COLA means that older people could face higher health care costs. Most have their Medicare Part B premiums for outpatient care deducted directly from their Social Security payments, and the annual cost-of-living increase is usually enough to cover any rise in premiums. When that doesn't happen, a long-standing federal "hold harmless" law protects the majority of beneficiaries from having their Social Security payments reduced. But that leaves about 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries on the hook for a premium increase that otherwise would be spread among all. Those who would pay the higher premiums include 2.8 million new beneficiaries, 1.6 million whose premiums aren't deducted from their Social Security payments and 3.1 million people with higher incomes. Their premiums could jump by about $54 a month, or 50 percent. Those with higher incomes would pay even larger amounts. States also would feel a budget impact because they pay part of the Medicare premium for about 10 million low-income beneficiaries. All beneficiaries would see their Part B annual deductible for outpatient care jump by $76, to an estimated $223. The deductible is the annual amount patients pay before Medicare kicks in. "This would affect all beneficiaries," said Tricia Neuman of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. "This kind of an increase is unprecedented." Senate Democrats have introduced legislation that would freeze Medicare's Part B premium and deductible for 2016, but its prospects are uncertain. White House spokeswoman Katie Hill said, "We share the goal of keeping Medicare's premiums affordable, are exploring all options." By law, the cost-of-living adjustment is based on the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, or CPI-W, a broad measure of consumer prices generated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It measures price changes for food, housing, clothing, transportation, energy, medical care, recreation and education.


News Article
Site: http://news.yahoo.com/energy/

In this Friday, Oct. 9, 2015, photo, Glen Mead operates a line drill machine at a rock quarry, in Montrose, Pa. Mead spent his life working as a dairy farmer and at age 60, began working with Rock Ridge Stone in Montrose, to make ends meet. For just the third time in 40 years, millions of Social Security recipients, disabled veterans and federal retirees can expect no increase in benefits next year, unwelcome news for more than one-fifth of the nation's population. (AP Photo/Brett Carlsen) More WASHINGTON (AP) — For just the third time in 40 years, millions of Social Security recipients, disabled veterans and federal retirees can expect no increase in benefits next year, which is unwelcome news for more than one-fifth of the nation's population. They can blame low gas prices. By law, the annual cost-of-living adjustment, or COLA, is based on a government measure of inflation, which is being dragged down by lower prices at the pump. The government is scheduled to announce the COLA — or lack of one — on Thursday, when it releases the Consumer Price Index for September. Inflation has been so low this year that economists say there is little chance the September numbers will produce a benefit increase for next year. Prices actually have dropped from a year ago, according to the inflation measure used for the COLA. "It's a very high probability that it will be zero," said economist Polina Vlasenko, a research fellow at the American Institute for Economic Research. "Other prices — other than energy — would have to jump. It would have to be a very sizable increase that would be visible, and I don't think that's happened." Congress enacted automatic increases for Social Security beneficiaries in 1975, when inflation was high and there was a lot of pressure to regularly raise benefits. Since then, increases have averaged 4 percent a year. Only twice before, in 2010 and 2011, have there been no increases. In all, the COLA affects payments to more than 70 million Americans. Almost 60 million retirees, disabled workers, spouses and children get Social Security benefits. The average monthly payment is $1,224. The COLA also affects benefits for about 4 million disabled veterans, 2.5 million federal retirees and their survivors, and more than 8 million people who get Supplemental Security Income, the disability program for the poor. Many people who get SSI also receive Social Security. Carol Mead of Montrose, Pennsylvania, said she and her husband were counting on Social Security COLA to help them with their finances. "My husband is working just so we can pay our bills," said Mead, a retired land-use administrator. "He's 70 years old, and he's still working in a stone quarry. He's told me a number of times that he thinks he's going to have to work until the day he dies." More bad news: The lack of a COLA means that older people could face higher health care costs. Most have their Medicare Part B premiums for outpatient care deducted directly from their Social Security payments, and the annual cost-of-living increase is usually enough to cover any rise in premiums. When that doesn't happen, a long-standing federal "hold harmless" law protects the majority of beneficiaries from having their Social Security payments reduced. But that leaves about 30 percent of Medicare beneficiaries on the hook for a premium increase that otherwise would be spread among all. Those who would pay the higher premiums include 2.8 million new beneficiaries, 1.6 million whose premiums aren't deducted from their Social Security payments, and 3.1 million people with higher incomes. Their premiums could jump by about $54 a month; the jump could be more for those with higher incomes. States also would feel a budget impact because they pay part of the Medicare premium for about 10 million low-income beneficiaries. All beneficiaries would see their Part B annual deductible for outpatient care jump by $76, to an estimated $223. The deductible is the annual amount patients pay before Medicare kicks in. "This would affect all beneficiaries," said Tricia Neuman of the nonpartisan Kaiser Family Foundation. "This kind of an increase is unprecedented." Senate Democrats have introduced legislation that would freeze Medicare's Part B premium and deductible for 2016, but its prospects are uncertain. White House spokeswoman Katie Hill said: "We share the goal of keeping Medicare's premiums affordable, and are exploring all options." By law, the cost-of-living adjustment is based on the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers, or CPI-W, a broad measure of consumer prices generated by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. It measures price changes for food, housing, clothing, transportation, energy, medical care, recreation and education.

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