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Srinivasa R.P.,Sri Siddhartha Medical College and Hospital | Harish K.N.,Sri Siddhartha Medical College and Hospital
Medico-Legal Update | Year: 2013

Drawing a public attention and awareness towards casualties is important to prevent unnatural deaths; this possibly could reduce the incidence of such cases. This is a retrospective study (3 years & 11 months) conducted to understand the magnitude & pattern of medicolegal cases in this region of the state. In this study revealed that road traffic accidents (64.6%) constituted the majority of medicolegal cases out of 1300, followed by assault and poisoning (10.3% and 8.4% respectively). Male predominance is quite evident. The affected age group is 21-30 years (30.5%) followed by 31-40 years and were more prone to such casualties. Source


Harish Kumar N.,Sri Siddhartha Medical College and Hospital | Srinivasa Reddy P.,Sri Siddhartha Medical College and Hospital
Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology | Year: 2013

In the past two decades, India has witnessed rapid urbanization, motorization, industrialization and migration of people resulting in socio demographic, epidemiological, technological and media transition and development. In spite of recent advancement of technology in the field of medical sciences, death and deformities due to all causes, are yet to be controlled successfully; rather incidences of road traffic accidents has been increasing at an alarming rate in our country and also throughout the world3. Drawing a public attention and awareness towards casualties is important to prevent unnatural deaths; this possibly could reduce the incidence of such cases. This is a retrospective study of pattern of medico legal cases conducted and compared at two tertiary care hospitals at different places in Karnataka namely Sri Siddhartha Medical College Hospital, Tumkur and Harsha Hospital, Nelamangala, Bangalore rural district to understand the magnitude & pattern of medico-legal cases in these regions of the state. In this study conducted at these tertiary care hospitals revealed that road traffic accidents constituted 840 (64.6%) & 1136 (75.3%) cases respectively being majority of medico-legal cases, followed by poisoning 110 (8.4%) & 149 (9.84%) cases respectively and assault cases 134 (10.3%) & 74 (4.9%) cases respectively. Male predominance is quite evident. The affected age group is 21-30 years with 397 (30.5%) & 664 (44%) cases respectively followed by 31-40 years 291 (22.6%) & 335 (22.18%) cases respectively indicating young were exposed to such casualties. Violence is a significant public health problem and assault or homicide is severest form of violence, depriving a human being of his fundamental right to live. Source


Srinivasa Reddy P.,Sri Siddhartha Medical College and Hospital | Harish Kumar N.,Sri Siddhartha Medical College and Hospital
Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology | Year: 2013

Accidents occur not only due to ignorance but also due to carelessness, thoughtlessness and over confidence. Human, vehicular and environmental factors play role before, during and after a Road Traffic Accidents (RTA). Road traffic injuries are partially predictable and hence preventable. A total of 1136 road traffic accident cases reported to emergency department of Harsha Hospital during the study period. All of these cases were included in the study. Majority 740 (65.13%) of the victims were in the age group of 21-30 years followed by 31-40 years. 929 (81.77%) of the victims were males and 207 (18.23%) victims were females. Majority of cases were head injuries 326 (28.69%) followed by abdominal injuries & limb injuries 215 (18.92%) & 190 (16.72%) respectively. Source


Srinivasa Reddy P.,Sri Siddhartha Medical College and Hospital | Rajendra Kumar R.,Sri Siddhartha Medical College and Hospital | Rudramurthy,S. RMO and Senior Specialist Forensic Medicine
Journal of Indian Academy of Forensic Medicine | Year: 2012

Asphyxial death forms one of the modes of death which may be suicidal, homicidal or accidental in nature. A retrospective study of autopsies conducted between years 2006-2010 is an attempt to know the incidence of asphyxial deaths at district hospital, Tumkur. During this period there were 2288 deaths, out of which 438 deaths were of asphyxial deaths. The most common form of asphyxial death was hanging followed by drowning. The incidences of asphyxial deaths were more in males than females in the ratio of 1.4:1. These cases were studied to know age and sex distribution of the victims. In this study, we found that among asphyxial deaths hanging were more 268 (61.18%) followed by drowning 140 (31.96%), strangulation 19 (4.33%) and others respectively. Appropriate education, influencing the media in their portrayal of suicidal news, reporting method, involvement of young generations in encouraging activities may reduce the rate of suicidal death by hanging in future. Source


Rajendra Kumar R.,Sri Siddhartha Medical College and Hospital | Srinivasa Reddy P.,Sri Siddhartha Medical College and Hospital | Rudramurthy S.,District General Hospital
Journal of South India Medicolegal Association | Year: 2012

The present study was undertaken with an objective of determining the pattern of unnatural death cases autopsied at the District Hospital, Tumkur, South India. Data were collected from 2288 autopsies performed over a period of five years (2006-2010). Of these, 93.75% deaths were due to unnatural causes and 6.25% deaths were due to natural causes. Of the total cases autopsied, 50.21% were suicidal, 39.99% were accidental and 3.54% were homicidal. Male to female ratio was 2.6:1. Unnatural deaths were more in the 3 rd and 4 th decades of life. Whereas, natural deaths were more in the 41-50 years age group. Majority of the accidental and suicidal deaths were due to road traffic incidents and organophosphorous poisoning, respectively. Majority of the natural deaths were due to cardiovascular reasons. © 2012 South India Medico-Legal Association. All rights reserved. Source

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