Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Science SRIPMS

Tamil Nadu, India

Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Science SRIPMS

Tamil Nadu, India
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Manjula D.A.S.,Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical science SRIPMS | Varghese A.K.,Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical science SRIPMS | Sriram S.,Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical science SRIPMS | Rajalingam B.,Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical science SRIPMS | And 3 more authors.
International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences | Year: 2011

Numerous clinically significant drug interactions have been reported in the medical literature between Warfarin and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The degree of binding of drugs to plasma protein has marked effect on its pharmacological effect. The binding of Warfarin and Duloxetine to bovine serum albumin in presence of selected NSAIDs (Aceclofenac, Diclofenac, Mefenamic acid and Naproxen) were studied by equilibrium dialysis method in order to understand the displacement interaction between these drugs. Results showed that the free (unbound) fraction of both Warfarin and Duloxetine were increased by all the selected NSAIDs. The magnitude of inhibition of protein binding of both Warfarin and Duloxetine by NSAIDs were as follows: Mefenamic acid>Diclofenac>Aceclofenac>Naproxen. Since Warfarin is a drug with low therapeutic index and low clearance, avoiding the concomitant use of Warfarin with these NSAIDs is the best way to prevent serious drug interactions. While this is not always possible, alternative therapies for either Warfarin or the NSAIDs must be considered. If the combination of Warfarin and NSAIDs therapy is necessary, it is important that patients be monitored closely (especially in the first few days) for changes in the level of their anticoagulation activity, with adjustment in the dose of Warfarin if necessary. Transient increase in free concentration of Duloxetine during concurrent administration with NSAIDs may not be clinically relevant since Duloxetine is a drug with extraction value higher than 90%.


Subhadra Devi V.,Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Science SRIPMS | Asok Kumar K.,Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Science SRIPMS | Uma Maheswari M.,Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Science SRIPMS | Sivashanmugam A.T.,Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Science SRIPMS
Indian Drugs | Year: 2010

The chemical substances present in the medicinal plants are believed to be an important source with therapeutic effects. For many centuries, several health disorders have been treated by using plant extracts from medicinal plants. In the last decade, the study of plant extract has attracted attention in curing various challenging diseases. Many plants are of folklore origin and are traditionally used in the Indian system of medicine. One such herb known for many centuries in Ayurveda is Centella asiatica, commonly known as Indian Pennywort. The plant is well known for improving memory and intellectual ability. The herb as a whole is used to improve memory, intelligence, as a nerve tonic, tranquiliser, to treat anaemia, asthma, blood disorders, diuretic, wound healing, epilepsy, abdominal disorders, bronchitis, fever, urinary discharge and splenomegaly. Various extracts from this herb have known to possess pharmacological properties. In the traditional system of medicine, Ayurveda, Centella asiatica is used for neuropharmacological activities, anti ulcer, cardiovascular, antinociceptive and anti inflammatory, wound healing, immunomodulatory, anti cancer, anti microbial and antioxidant activity. A wide variety of chemical compounds including alkaloids, flavonoids, sterols, triterpenoids have been found in this plant. The major phytoconstituents of the herb is saponins chiefly asiatic acid, asiaticoside, madecassoside, madecassic acid and flavonoids. This contribution provides a comprehensive review of ethnomedical uses, chemical constitutents and pharmacological uses as a medicinal plant.

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