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Bharatwaj R.S.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute Of Medical science | Vijaya K.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute Of Medical science | Rajaram P.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute Of Medical science
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2012

Introduction: The ability to transfuse blood represents one of the great advances in modern medicine, which has made much of today's surgeries safer and possible. Voluntary blood donors are the safest and the ideal sources of good quality blood. Inspiration among and participation of the student community is essential to make the "voluntary blood donation" movement a success. Materials and Methods: A pretested, close ended questionnaire was administered to 104 randomly chosen students and their responses were further compiled and analyzed. Later, an interactive 2 hours session was organized, which gave information about the voluntary blood donation and which addressed all the issues which were a part of the questionnaire. At the end of the session, the willingness of the students in donating blood was again noted. Results and Discussion: All the participants had an incomplete knowledge regarding the various aspects of voluntary blood donation. The participants who had a relatively better knowledge had parents with a significantly higher educational status. Only 1 of the participant had donated blood so far. Among the participants, 85% were willing to donate blood voluntarily. Those who were unwilling to donate stated fear and inconvenience as the reasons for their unwillingness. The short interactive session significantly enhanced the willingness to donate blood, among those who were initially unwilling. Conclusion: Interactive awareness sessions on voluntary blood donation should be organized early after the college entry and opportunities for blood donation should be created for the students, which can greatly enhance the movement for "voluntary non-remunerated blood donation", to ensure a good quality of blood and safe modern medical care.


Vidyalakshmi K.,Madha Dental College | Kamalakannan P.,Meenakshi Medical College and Research Institute MAHER | Viswanathan S.,Meenakshi Medical College and Research Institute MAHER | Ramaswamy S.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science
Anti-Inflammatory and Anti-Allergy Agents in Medicinal Chemistry | Year: 2012

This study was designed to evaluate the anti-inflammatory action of four dihydroxy flavone derivatives; 3,3'-dihydroxy flavone, 5,6-dihydroxy flavone, 3,7-dihydroxy flavone and 6,3'-dihydroxy flavone and to further investigate the multiple cellular mechanisms underlying the anti-inflammatory effect of these compounds. The effect of dihydroxy flavones on acute inflammation was studied in rats employing carrageenan induced hind paw edema method. Further, the role of proinflammatory cytokines like TNF-α and IL-1β, cyclooxygenases (COX-1 and COX-2), and free radicals in the action of flavone derivatives was investigated using in vitro assays. All the four dihydroxy flavone derivatives exhibited time and dose dependent inhibition of carrageenan induced paw edema. In addition, the investigated compounds inhibited both the isoforms of cyclooxygenase and cytokines in a concentration dependant manner and also suppressed the release of reactive oxygen species. The anti-inflammatory effect of dihydroxy flavones may be through mechanisms that involve an interaction with cyclooxygenases, cytokines and reactive oxygen species. © 2012 Bentham Science Publishers.


Pandurangan K.,Meenakshi Academy of Higher Education and Research | Krishnappan V.,Madha Dental College and Hospitals | Subramanian V.,Meenakshi Academy of Higher Education and Research | Subramanyan R.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science
European Journal of Pharmacology | Year: 2014

The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antinociceptive action of certain dimethoxy flavones (DMF, (7,2'-dimethoxy flavone, 7,3'-dimethoxy flavone, 7,4'-dimethoxy flavone and 7,8,-dimethoxy flavone) and the possible mechanisms involved. The antinociceptive effect of dimethoxy flavones was investigated in mice employing acetic acid-induced abdominal writhings, formalin-induced nociception and hot water tail immersion assay procedures. To identify the possible mechanisms involved in the antinociceptive action of these compounds, acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction assay alone was employed. Mice were pretreated with naloxone, yohimbine, ondansetron, haloperidol, bicuculline or glibenclamide before dimethoxy flavone treatment to identify the role of opioid, adrenergic, 5HT3-serotonergic, dopaminergic, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) receptor or potassium channels, respectively. The investigated dimethoxy flavones produced a significant reduction in the number of abdominal constrictions in acetic acid assay. A dose dependent decrease in paw-licking response time was evident in both the early and late phases of formalin induced nociception. A significant increase in reaction time was also evident after treatment with various dimethoxy flavones in hot water tail immersion assay. Pretreatment with naloxone, ondansetron or glibenclamide significantly attenuated the antinociceptive effect of all the four dimethoxy flavones. Yohimbine pretreatment attenuated the antinociceptive response of 7,3'-dimethoxy flavone, 7,4'-dimethoxy flavone and 7,8-dimethoxy flavone. Pretreatment with haloperidol potentiated the antinociceptive response of all the tested dimethoxy flavones. The antinociceptive effect of 7,2'-dimethoxy flavone and 7,3'-dimethoxy flavone was annulled by bicuculline pretreatment. The results of the present study reveal the antinociceptive effect of dimethoxy flavones involving multiple pathways. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Rathnakumar K.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science | Jaikumar S.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science
Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology | Year: 2013

Euphorbia is a genus of plants belonging to the family Euphorbiaceae. Euphorbia hirta is a very popular herb amongst practitioners of traditional herb medicine. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of ethanolic extract of Euphorbia hirta aerial parts in naphthalene induced cataract in rats. Euphorbia hirta aerial extract at dose levels (200 and 400 mg/kg), and Vitamin E (50mg/kg) were used as standard drugs, while liquid paraffin was used for control. The test drugs were administered for 25 days. Naphthalene (0.5 g/kg for first 3 days and 1g/kg thereafter for a period of 25 days) was used to induce cataract. Ophthalmoscope was used to examine the percentage of cataract incidence and opacity index. Naphthalene produced a significant mature cataract and an increase in the opacity index at various stages. Euphorbia hirta extract decrease the onset and maturation of cataract against naphthalene challenge in rats. From the results it was concluded that the Euphorbia hirta aerial extract showed anti-cataract activity against naphthalene induced cataract in rats. ©RJPT All right reserved.


Malani A.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science | Keoliya A.,SVN Government Medical College
Medico-Legal Update | Year: 2016

Snakebites are rural and occupational health hazards worldwide. Along with venom snake oral cavity harbors potential human pathogens. The snake bites have resulted in transmission of these pathogens to humans imposing use of antibiotics. The present study showed that both aerobic and anaerobic pathogens are transmitted from snake to human beings at bite site. With low incidence of secondary infection use of antibiotics requires culture sensitivity support. © 2016, World Informations Syndicate. All rights reserved.


Malani A.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science | Keoliya A.,SVN Government Medical College
Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology | Year: 2016

Since ancient times snake bite is a rural and occupational public health problem in many countries. In the present study variety of microorganisms, including both aerobic and anaerobic organisms has been isolated from snake oral cavity. Snake bite may result in venom toxicity and secondary infections due to microorganisms from snake oral cavity. Since few snake oral cavity did not show any growth and the antibacterial activity of snake venom makes to reconsider the use of prophylactic antibiotics. Use of antibiotics is better supported with culture sensitivity examination. © 2016, Indian Journal of Forensic Medicine and Toxicology. All rights reserved.


Vidyalakshmi K.,Meenakshi Ammal Dental College | Kamalakannan P.,Meenakshi Medical College | Viswanathan S.,Meenakshi Medical College | Ramaswamy S.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science
Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior | Year: 2010

Objective: This study was designed to evaluate the antinociceptive action of four dihydroxy flavone derivatives; 3,3'-dihydroxy flavone, 5,6-dihydroxy flavone, 3,7-dihydroxy flavone and 6,3'-dihydroxy flavone and to investigate the mechanisms involved. Materials and methods: The antinociceptive effect of dihydroxy flavones was investigated in mice employing acetic acid induced abdominal constrictions, formalin-induced nociception, and hot plate assay procedures. The effects following pretreatment with naloxone, yohimbine, ondansetron, haloperidol, bicuculline and glibenclamide were also studied by acetic acid assay to reveal the involvement of opioid, adrenergic, tryptaminergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic or potassium channels respectively in the antinociceptive action of these compounds. Results: Dihydroxy flavone derivatives significantly reduced the number of abdominal constrictions in acetic acid assay. The paw licking response time during both the early and late phases of formalin-induced nociception was reduced in a dose dependent manner by dihydroxy flavones treatment. A significant increase in reaction time was also evident in hot plate assay after dihydroxy flavones treatment.The antinociceptive effect of dihydroxy flavones in the acetic acid assay was significantly attenuated by pretreatment with either naloxone or bicuculline. However, pretreatment of animals with yohimbine, ondansetron, haloperidol, or glibenclamide did not alter the response. Conclusion: All the four investigated dihydroxy flavones produced dose related antinociception through mechanisms that involve an interaction with opioid and GABAergic pathways. © 2010 Elsevier Inc.


Jaikumar S.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science
Research Journal of Pharmaceutical, Biological and Chemical Sciences | Year: 2010

The stem bark of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis linn possesses several bioactivities and is used in traditional medicinal systems. However, its antidiabetic activity has not been scientifically investigated so far. The aim of this study was to investigate the antidiabetic activity of ethanol extract of stem bark of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis linn. This was tested in streptozotocin (STZ) - nicotinamide induced diabetic rats using oral administration of ethanol extract (EENA). In diabetic rats, the ethanol extract of stem bark of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis linn significantly lowered the blood glucose level in a dose-dependent manner. In glucose tolerance test, the extracts at the doses of 250 and 500 markedly reduced the external glucose load. The antidiabetic activity of ethanol extract of stem bark of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis linn is comparable to that of diabetic control animals. It is concluded that ethanol extract of stem bark of Nyctanthes arbor-tristis linn possess safe and strong antidiabetic activity.


Jaikumar S.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science | Ramaswamy S.,Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science | Asokan B.R.,Aarupadai Veedu Medical College | Mohan T.,Aarupadai Veedu Medical College | Gnanavel M.,Shasun Chemicals and Drugs Ltd.
Research Journal of Pharmaceutical, Biological and Chemical Sciences | Year: 2010

This study has been undertaken to investigate the effect of methanolic extract of leaves of Jatropha curcas Linn. (JC) on pylorus ligation and Aspirin-induced gastric ulcers in Wistar rats. 30 albino wistar rats of either sex were selected and divided into 5 groups of 6 animals each. Gastric lesions produced by pylorus ligation (PL) plus aspirin (200mg/Kg, PO). Treatment with JC extract of (100 mg/Kg bodyweight, 200 mg /Kg body weight) and ranitidine (50 mg/Kg body weight) for 6 days to the aspirin and PL rats were given and absorb the acid parameters.A significant dose dependant reduction (P < 0.05) in the acid parameters like gastric volume, pH, total acidity, total acid output, total proteins and ulcer index were observed after treatment with 100 mg, 200 mg JC extracts in PL plus aspirin induced ulcers compared to the normal PL rats. Histopathological examination of stomach mucosa showed the protective action of JC extracts against mucosal epithelial damage caused by aspirin. The present study provides a strong evidence of antiulcer activity of JC extract against gastric lesions. The antiulcer activity is recognized by a reduction in acid-secretary parameters (i.e. total and free acid), gastric volume and ulcer score suggesting that acid inhibition accelerates ulcer healing, thereby strengthening of mucosal barrier.


PubMed | Sri Lakshminarayana Institute of Medical science and Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College & Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Sultan Qaboos University medical journal | Year: 2016

The infrahyoid muscles are involved in vocalisation and swallowing; among these, the sternothyroid muscle is derived from the common primitive sheet. The improper differentiation of this muscle may therefore result in morphological variations. We report an unusual variation found during the dissection of a 65-year-old male cadaver at the Sri Manakula Vinayagar Medical College, Madagadipet, Pondicherry, India, in 2015. An anomalous belly of the right sternothyroid muscle was observed between the internal jugular (IJ) vein and the internal carotid artery with an additional insertion into the tympanic plate and petrous part of the temporal bone and the presence of a

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