Sri Mādhopur, India
Sri Mādhopur, India

Time filter

Source Type

Hemanth Sai K.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Srilekha K.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy
International Journal of Pharmacy and Technology | Year: 2011

Microbes are microscopic organisms living with, in and on human beings from the very beginning of the mankind. Microbial diseases rank as number one cause for almost half the death in underdeveloped and tropical countries. One of the greatest accomplishments of the modern medicine has been the development of antimicrobials for the treatment of infectious diseases. The discovery and development of the antibiotics have led dramatic improvement in the ability to treat infectious diseases and is among the major advances of the 20th century. Many plants which have a use in day to day life are having potent anti microbial activity. So here we aim at comparatively evaluating the antimicrobial activity of Azadirachta indica, Curcuma longa & Murraya koinegii and confirming as to which of these plants have a better activity by performing antihelminthic and antimicrobial screening.


Ravikumar V.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Sirajuddin Khan M.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy
International Journal of Pharmacy and Technology | Year: 2011

The main aim of the work, done by the author, is to estimate the active ingredient Karanjin, a cyclic furanoflavonoid, present in the different parts of seed extracts of karanja (Pongamia glabra) mentioned the structure in Fig.1. and to carry out the Quantitative Analysis of the Karanjin. Reporting the % of Karanjin present in the different solvent extracts namely: ethyl acetate, methanol & hexane of dry seed, kernel, shell and fresh seed & kernal of Pongamia glabra. By taking 200g. of each part found that in dry kernel maximum amount of 36.92g. is extracted by using methanol solvent, which was quantified by using HPLC was reported as 18.46% which is maximum when compared with other parts or by using other solvents.


Samba Siva Rao A.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy
Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research | Year: 2016

Objective: The objective of the current work was to develop Ivabradine hydrochloride (HCl) floating pulsatile pellets containing drug loaded calcium alginate pellets coated with pH-dependent polymer Eudragit S100 oil dispersion. Methods: Fluidized bed coating technique was used to develop pellets. A 22factorial design was employed to study the effect of independent variables (inlet air temperature, spray rate), on dependent variables (% entrapment efficiency, % friability, and average particle size). Optimization was done by fitting experimental data to the software program (Minitab). Obtained pellets were subjected to different evaluation parameters which are critical in the development of the dosage form. An in vitro lag phase study was carried out for all batches in simulated gastric fluid (0.1N HCl) for 5 hrs and in vitro drug release study was carried out for optimized batch (B4) of two different sizes (10/12#, 12/16#) in simulated intestinal fluid (pH 7.4 phosphate buffer). Results: The optimized batch (B4) showed satisfactory % entrapment efficiency of 92.66±1.52; % friability of 0.57±0.03; and average particle size of 1424±16 (μm). All batches maintained lag phase for 5 hrs in 0.1N HCl. An optimized batch of two different sizes exhibited a burst release within 30 minutes in simulated intestinal fluid with no significant difference in release rate constant (*p>0.05) and followed first order kinetics. Conclusion: Thus, ivabradine HCl floating pulsatile pellets was successfully developed for treating angina pectoris which is an underlying cause of heart attack by fluidized bed coating technique employing factorial design. © 2016, Asian Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research. All rights reserved.


SirajuddinKhan M.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Ravikumar V.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Neelima K.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy
International Journal of Pharmacy and Technology | Year: 2011

The most dramatic, common and constant event of life is age-related modification of skin acts as the best external marker of aging. The skin protects against mechanical trauma, UV light and infection. In addition, the skin is concerned with thermoregulation, conservation and excretion of fluid, sensory perception and also has aesthetic role. In our day to day of our life the intrigrity of skin is compromised such as by a gunshot, fall, or surgical procedure; by an infectious disease; or by an underlying condition. It is therefore important to identify and evaluate available natural drugs as alternatives to currently used wound healing drugs which are not always free from adverse effects. A range of medicinal plants with wound healing properties is widely used by traditional healers. However, the effectiveness of many of these wound healing plants has not been scientifically evaluated. Ananas comosus commonly known as pineapple originated in the tropical regions of Brazil. It has been in cultivation since ancient times by various Indian tribes. It is now cultivated throughout the tropics. It is cultivated in Assam, west Bengal and along the coast of Kerela. The present study investigates the wound healing activity of the fruit of Ananas comosus.


Kumar V.R.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Kandagatla K.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Chillal S.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy
International Journal of Pharmacy and Technology | Year: 2011

Hypertension is one of the most common disorders. Approximately one billion people world-wide are affected with hypertension. About 90-95% of cases are categorized as primary hypertension, which means with no obvious medical cause. Treatment of hypertension includes ACE inhibitors, alpha blockers, beta blockers, calcium channel blockers, diuretics etc. Drug therapy like many synthetic drugs and antihypertensive medicaments has a risk of causing side effects depending on the person as well as the type of drug being taken. These include dizziness, nausea, stomach problems, impotence, fatigue, insomnia, loss of appetite and others. There is a great deal of scientific evidence to suggest that the use of carefully chosen herbal remedies and dietary supplements can help to lower blood pressure, as well as to improve the overall functioning of heart, arteries and the entire cardiovascular system. Conventional medicines usually treat the symptoms of high blood pressure but seldom address the underlying causes. Naturopathy believes in removing the causes of high blood pressure with a combination of lifestyle changes and natural remedies, rather than simply treating symptoms. Hence the present article focuses on different medicinal plants worldwide used for hypertension rather than on medications.


Beeravolu S.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Vejendla R.K.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Nagula S.K.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy
International Journal of Pharmacy and Technology | Year: 2012

Anovel, safe and sensitive method of spectrophotometric estimation in UV-visible region has been developed using 0.1N HCl, 0.1NNaOH for the quantitative determination of DCS and PC.DCS have λmax at 225nm and obeys Beer's law in concentration range of 5-35μg/ml.PC have λmax at 244nm and obey Beer's law in concentration range of 5-35μg/ml.All the results, parameters of the analysis were validated statistically.


Madhu C.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Ramanjaneyulu M.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy
International Journal of Pharma and Bio Sciences | Year: 2013

In the present study, the anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect of the hydroalcoholic extract of coccinia grandis whole plant was investigated. The hydroalcoholic extracts of coccinia grandis whole plant were ingested orally (p.o.) in two different doses, 200 and 400 (mg/kg body weight). The anti-inflammatory effect of coccinia grandis was tested in: carrageenan-induced paw oedema in wistar albino rats and compared with the standard, diclofenac (10 mg/kg body weight). The analgesic effect of the hydroalcoholic effect of coccinia grandis was evaluated in Swiss albino mice by usingEddys hot plate method and compared with the standard, aspirin (25 mg/kg body weight). The results showed that coccinia grandis has significant reduction (p.0.01) in inflammation (200 mg/kg body weight) and (400 mg/kg body weight) as compared to the standard drug, diclofenac. In assessing analgesic effects, there is a significant (p<0.01) reduction in the paw licking for (400 mg/kg) and diclofenac (10 mg/kg) when compared to control. These results expressing that the extracts would possess analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. All these effects and the changes in the behavioural activities could be suggested as contributory effects to the use of coccinia grandis whole plant in the management of inflammation and painful conditions.


Narasimha G.L.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Jairam D.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Krishna A.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy | Qureshi M.R.,Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy
Research Journal of Pharmacy and Technology | Year: 2015

The present study was aimed at preparing a Floating drug delivery system for the model drug Losartan, and evaluating the various processing parameters including the buoyancy studies and in vitro drug release studies. Four formulations containing varying proportions of polymers like HPMC K4M and Ethyl cellulose and fixed amount of gas generating agent such as Sodium bi carbonate, material like bees wax were prepared. The tablets were prepared by melt granulation technique and the prepared tablets remained buoyant for more than 8hrs in the release medium. The proportions of the polymers showed significant difference in the release of the drug. All the formulations exhibited diffusion dominant drug release and were found to be stable. © RJPT All right reserved.

Loading Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy collaborators
Loading Sri Indu Institute of Pharmacy collaborators