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Narasimha A.,Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research Kolar | Vasavi B.,Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research Kolar | Kumar H.,Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research Kolar | Sapna M.,Sri Devaraj Urs Academy of Higher Education and Research Kolar
Journal of SAFOG | Year: 2011

Introduction: Cervicovaginal cytology (Pap test) is the commonly used tool for screening of cervical cancers. Its accurate interpretation depends on obtaining adequately cellular samples prepared to a high standard. Its accuracy and cost-effectiveness can be seriously compromised by inadequate samples. Aim: To audit the adequacy of Pap smears in diagnosing cervical cancer. Study design: Pap smears reported were retrieved from the hospital records and data were analyzed. Histopathology correlation done for abnormal pap smears. Results: A total of 1,531 cases were reported; 1,157 (75.57%) cases were adequate and 374 (24.42%) inadequate. Qualitative inadequacy included inadequate fixation and poor quality of staining 10 (2.67%), drying artefacts 15 (4.10%), broken slides five (1.33%). Quantitative inadequacy was sampling errors - lack of junctional component 186 (49.73%), presence of inflammation 138 (36.89%) and blood 20 (5.34%). 998 (86.25%) were labeled as negative. About 159 (13.74%) cases showed epithelial cell abnormalities. Cytohistological correlation revealed significant discrepancy. The majority of these were carcinomas that were misdiagnosed as atypical cells. Conclusion: Cytopathologists or clinicians must be adequately trained, experienced and subject to regular audit. Reporting of atypical cells needs to be addressed with more stringent training of cytopathologists. Source

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