Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Pābna, Bangladesh

Saiful Islam M.,International Islamic University Chittagong | Badrul Alam M.,Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology | Zahan R.,Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology | Sarker G.C.,Square Pharmaceuticals Ltd | And 7 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer Research | Year: 2011

The present study was designed to investigate the antioxidant and anti neoplastic activities of Ocimum sanctum Linn. (OS) leaves. Antioxidant potential of the OS extract was evaluated in vitro by DPPH (1, 1diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) and NO (Nitric Oxide) scavenging assay and reducing power assay method. OS extract showed prominent scavenging activity in all the methods with IC50 value of 16.39±0.31 and 16.20±0.33 μg mL-1 for DPPH and NO assay method, respectively. In reducing power assay, OS extract also showed significant (p<0.001) activity. In addition, total phenolic and flavonoid content and total antioxidant capacity were also determined. The anti neoplastic effect of the leaves of OS against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) in mice at the doses of 50 mg kg-1 body weight intraperit one ally. Significant (p<0.001) increases of survival times 33±1.81 days for crude extract of the (50 mg kg-1) treated tumor bearing mice were confirmed with respect to the control group (20±0.12 days). Hematological studies reveal that the Heamoglobin (Hb) content was decreased in EAC treated mice whereas restoration to near normal levels was observed in extract treated animals. There was a significant (p<0.001) decrease in RBC count and increase in WBC counts in extract/fraction treated animals when compared to EAC treated animals. From the result it was showed that the extract has significant antioxidant as well as anti neoplastic activity. © 2011 Academic Journals Inc. Source


Ullah M.,University of Development Alternative | Ullah M.,Square Pharmaceuticals Ltd
American Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology | Year: 2015

Water For Injections (WFI) which is the main vehicle of Large Volume Parenterals (LVPs) should be free from trace amount of genotoxic impurities. This review gives emphasis on quantification of genotoxic trace metals during qualification of WFI in LVPs manufacturing unit. According to ICH guidelines, impurities related to drug substances are classified into three main categories: Organic impurities, inorganic (elemental) impurities and residual solvents. Within these categories, genotoxic impurities form a special case that poses a significant safety risk, even at low concentrations, because they may be mutagenic and are therefore potentially damaging to DNA. As a result they can lead to mutations or cause cancer. Chemical carcinogens most often directly or after xenobiotic metabolism, act as genotoxic causes to induce DNA damage. The roles of trace metals (some of which are either genotoxic or non-genotoxic) in cancer development and inhibition have a complex character and have raised many questions because of their essential and toxic effects on people’s health. Trace metals such as cadmium, nickel, arsenic, beryllium and chromium (VI) have been recognized as human or animal carcinogens by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). There are several genotoxic chemicals like residual solvent, impurities and trace metals present in Pharmaceuticals to form carcinogens. Regulatory body like FDA and EMEA has fixed up specific limits for these elemental impurities. The toxicity of an elemental impurity is related to its extent of exposure (bioavailability). In that sense, parenteral dosage forms has its most possibility to be bioavailable than the other dosage forms, the limit of genotoxic impurities are 10 times lower than that of oral dosage forms by United States Pharmacopoeia (USP). The present article is for the importance of identification and quantification of the trace amount of the metal genotoxic impurities in Water For Injection (WFI) during qualification (IQ, OQ, PQ) as a preventive measure to control the production and distribution of WFI for Large Volume Parenteral (LVP) production. © 2015 Mohabbat Ullah. Source


Subhan M.A.,Bangladesh University | Uddin N.,Bangladesh University | Sarker P.,Square Pharmaceuticals Ltd | Azad A.K.,Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology | Begum K.,Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology
Spectrochimica Acta - Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy | Year: 2015

A novel tri-metallic oxide nanocomposite CeO2·CuO·ZnO has been synthesized by a simple co-precipitation method. The nanocomposite has been characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS, FTIR and PL spectra. The crystallite size of the CeO2·CuO·ZnO was calculated using XRD data. The crystallite size of the CeO2·CuO·ZnO mixed metal oxide annealed at 600 °C is found to be in range of 15.34-44.81 nm, with an average size of 29.51 nm. Excitation at different wavelengths showed PL in UV and visible regions. It has been found that PL behavior of CeO2·CuO·ZnO is excitation wavelength dependent. This flexible PL property is conflicting to well-known Kasha's rule of excitation wavelength dependence of emission spectrum. The catalyst shows better photo-catalytic dye degradation efficiency in slightly alkaline pH in presence of H2O2. Nanocomposite CeO2·CuO·ZnO was found to be effective against pathogenic bacteria. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Source


Subhan M.A.,Bangladesh University | Subhan M.A.,Osaka Kyoiku University | Uddin N.,Bangladesh University | Sarker P.,Square Pharmaceuticals Ltd | And 2 more authors.
Spectrochimica Acta - Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy | Year: 2015

Abstract A novel multi-metal nanocomposite oxide Ag2O·CeO2·ZnO has been prepared by co-precipitation of their carbonates from aqueous solutions of the metal nitrates following calcinations and annealing 5 h at 450 °C and 4 h at 600 °C. Ag2O·CeO2·ZnO has been characterized by XRD, SEM, EDS and PL spectra. According to XRD results the crystallite size of Ag2O·CeO2·ZnO varies in the range of 19-111 nm with an average size of 50 nm, which is in good agreement with SEM results. Elemental analysis was performed by SEM-EDS. Emissions of Ag2O·CeO2·ZnO has been observed in UV (NBE emission), visible and NIR regions at 325 nm excitation by a line of He-Cd laser. Photocatalytic as well as anti-bacterial activities have been studied. The nano composite Ag2O·CeO2·ZnO shows an excellent photocatalytic dye degradation activity. © 2015 Elsevier B.V. Source


Zahan R.,Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology | Badrul Alam M.,Atish Dipankar University of Science and Technology | Saiful Islam M.,International Islamic University Chittagong | Sarker G.C.,Square Pharmaceuticals Ltd | And 5 more authors.
International Journal of Cancer Research | Year: 2011

The research study was conducted to determine the antitumor effect of the flower of Alangium salvifolium (crude extract and diethylether fractions) against Ehrlich Ascites Carcinoma (EAC) in mice at the doses of 10 mg kg-1 body weight intraperitoneally. Extract/fractions was administered for nine consecutive days. Twenty-four hours of last dose and 18 h of fasting, the mice were sacrificed and antitumor effect was assessed by evaluating tumor volume, viable and nonviable tumor cell count, tumor weight and hematological parameters of EAC bearing host. Significant (p<0.001) increases of survival times 30±0.96 and 25±0.40 days for crude extract and diethylether fraction of the A. salvifolium (10 mg kg-1) treated tumor bearing mice, respectively were confirmed with respect to the control group (20±0.13 days). The extract/fraction also decreased the body weight of the EAC tumor bearing mice. Hematological studies reveal that the heamoglobin (Hb) content was decreased in EAC treated mice whereas restoration to near normal levels was observed in extract treated animals. There was a significant (p<0.001) decrease in RBC count and increase in WBC counts in extract/fraction treated animals when compared to EAC treated animals. From the result it was showed that the extract has significant anticancer activity and that is comparable to that of Bleomycin. © 2011 Academic Journals Inc. Source

Discover hidden collaborations