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Spring Arbor, MI, United States

Spring Arbor University is a Christian institution of higher education located in Spring Arbor, Michigan, in the United States. SAU is affiliated with the Free Methodist Church. It is the second-largest Evangelical Christian University in the state of Michigan. The university is accredited by the Higher Learning Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools and the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. Wikipedia.


Kuntzleman T.S.,Spring Arbor University
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2015

An activity is described wherein students observe dynamic floating and sinking behavior of plastic pieces in various liquids. The liquids and solids are all contained within a plastic bottle; the entire assembly is called a "density bottle". After completing a series of experiments that guides students to think about the relative densities of both the liquids and solids in the bottle, students are able to explain the curious floating and sinking phenomena. As a part of the activity, students construct their own bottles and are encouraged to describe to others how the density bottle works. These bottles can be constructed using inexpensive and easily obtained materials. The level of inquiry involved in the activity can be tailored to meet the particular interests and needs of students. Modifications to the density bottle, including an engaging one that uses LEGO pieces, are discussed. © 2015 The American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Source


Kuntzleman T.S.,Spring Arbor University
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2016

A very simple protocol for teaching Beer's Law and absorption spectrophotometry using a smart phone is described. Materials commonly found in high school chemistry laboratories or even around the house may be used. Data collection and analysis is quick and easy. Despite the simple nature of the experiment, excellent results can be achieved. © 2016 The American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Source


Kuntzleman T.S.,Spring Arbor University
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2015

National Chemistry Week (NCW) is an annual centerpiece for chemistry outreach orchestrated by the American Chemical Society. During this week, chemical educators promote chemistry through public lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on experiments. These exhibits inspire and motivate students, young and old, to study and appreciate chemistry more deeply. Chemical educators also benefit through participation in NCW, because doing so has great potential to initiate and advance scholarly efforts. How outreach efforts such as those associated with NCW can stimulate and support scholarship in chemistry is described. © 2015 The American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Source


Hall J.M.,Spring Arbor University | Amend J.R.,Montana State University | Kuntzleman T.S.,Spring Arbor University
Journal of Chemical Education | Year: 2016

Why do dead batteries bounce considerably higher than fresh batteries? This phenomenon has a chemical explanation that can be used to teach students about the chemistry of alkaline Zn/MnO2 cells. Batteries discharged to various extents can be tested for bounciness and conversion of Zn to ZnO. These measurements allow students to connect the chemistry that powers these batteries with the increased bouncing effect. The experiments can be presented as a teacher-led demonstration or hands-on laboratory for students. © 2016 The American Chemical Society and Division of Chemical Education, Inc. Source


Hofstetter T.E.,University of Utah | Howder C.,Spring Arbor University | Berden G.,FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics | Oomens J.,FOM Institute for Atomic and Molecular Physics | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Physical Chemistry B | Year: 2011

The gas-phase structures of singly and doubly charged complexes involving transition metal cations, Zn and Cd, bound to the amino acid histidine (His) as well as deprotonated His (His-H) are investigated using infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy utilizing light generated by a free electron laser. IRPMD spectra are measured for CdCl+(His), [Zn(His-H)] +, [Cd(His-H)]+, Zn2+(His)2, and Cd2+(His)2 in the 550-1800 cm-1 range. These studies are complemented by quantum mechanical calculations of the predicted linear absorption spectra at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) and B3LYP/Def2TZVP levels. The monomeric spectra are similar to one another and indicate that histidine coordinates to the metal in a charge-solvated (CS) tridentate form in the CdCl+(His) complex and has a similar tridentate configuration with a deprotonated carboxylic acid terminus in the [M(His-H)]+ complexes. The preference for these particular complexes is also found in the relative energetics calculated at the B3LYP, B3P86, and MP2(full) levels. The spectra of the dimer complexes have obvious CS characteristics, suggesting that at least one of the His ligands is charge solvated; however, there are also signatures for a salt-bridge (SB) formation in the second His ligand. The definitive assignment of a SB ligand is complicated by the presence of the CS ligand and conflicting relative energetics from the different levels of theory. © 2011 American Chemical Society. Source

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