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Liescheidt S.G.,SPPECSS Consulting LLC
Engineered Systems | Year: 2011

VAV systems have been used in laboratory exhaust and supply systems for energy savings. Applying VAV to labs is an engineering challenge due to the need to maintain pressurization control in the lab spaces and the need to exhaust the air from the building in a safe manner. Determining which type of VAV terminal devices is appropriate involves several factors. In some laboratories, it is acceptable to use standard VAV boxes like in any commercial office space, except that the laboratory application will generally require either a fiber-free type of insulation or a double-wall VAV box with metal on the inside of the box. The engineer needs to clearly specify the material of construction and functional performance at both peak and part-load performance to ensure the air devices will perform appropriately over the entire range of airflow in a VAV system. One of the most important decisions in a VAV lab application is the fan selection and control of those fans. Source


Liescheidt S.G.,SPPECSS Consulting LLC
Engineered Systems | Year: 2015

Keys include prioritizing what types and levels of HVAC service you'll need, managing site and fuel choices, and finding the right vendor(s) to provide the necessary equipment. You might note that most of that is nearly impossible to do once the trouble actually arrives. © 2015, Business News Publishing Co. All rights reserved. Source


Liescheidt S.G.,SPPECSS Consulting LLC
Engineered Systems | Year: 2015

System designers have a variety of options to both dehumidify and humidify the air within a commercial building. Central systems may be best in some instances, and elsewhere localized systems may be more appropriate and economical to install, operate, and maintain. The design challenge for professional engineer responsible for the HVAC design involves balancing building construction and energy codes and standards such as ASHRAE 55, 62, and 90. The basic fundamental theoretical analysis of peak cooling, heating, humidification, and ventilation requirements of a building and the spaces within the building are an extension of engineering fundamentals learned in a collegiate course such as heat transfer, fluids, and thermodynamics. The application of products and the controls of those products in a dynamic environment occupied by humans with differing metabolisms, comfort desires, and expectations becomes the challenge in controlling the part-load performance of the HVAC systems. Source


Liescheidt S.G.,SPPECSS Consulting LLC
Engineered Systems | Year: 2014

A heat or energy recovery ventilator is an essential piece of mechanical equipment that is used to pre-heat or pre-cool the outside air that is brought into a building for ventilation. The technology can be such that it can recover only sensible heat (called an HRV) or total heat, sensible and latent (called an ERV). The technology can be a rotating wheel or a fixed cubetype device. When sizing an HRV or ERV, the engineer must consider the ventilation load and also the intended use of the unit throughout the year. In some climates and applications there is no need (and it is possibly a detriment) to install an ERV versus an HRV. Most manufacturers have software programs to select their HRV and ERV units using basic input data that is needed to plot the conditions on a psychometric chart. The product selection program does all of the analysis and provides a performance printout that can be used as the basis-of-design unit requirements. Source

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