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Dr. Kirk McCullough and Dr. Dan Lorenz headline Annual Big 12 Conference Sports Medicine Meeting


News Article | April 25, 2017
Site: www.sciencedaily.com

A combination of aerobic and resistance exercises can significantly boost the brain power of the over 50s, finds the most comprehensive review of the available evidence to date, published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. And the effects were evident irrespective of the current state of an individual's brain health, the analysis shows. Physical exercise for older adults is seen as a promising means of warding off or halting a decline in brain health and cognitive abilities. Yet the evidence for its benefits is inconclusive, largely because of overly restrictive inclusion criteria in the reviews published to date, say the researchers. In a bid to try and plug some of these gaps, they systematically reviewed 39 relevant studies published up to the end of 2016 to assess the potential impact of varying types, intensities, and durations of exercise on the brain health of the over 50s. They included aerobic exercise; resistance training (such as weights); multi-component exercise, which contains elements of both aerobic and resistance training; tai chi; and yoga in their analysis. They analysed the potential impact of these activities on overall brain capacity (global cognition); attention (sustained alertness, including the ability to process information rapidly); executive function (processes responsible for goal oriented behaviours); memory (storage and retrieval); and working memory (short term application of found information). Pooled analysis of the data showed that exercise improves the brain power of the over 50s, irrespective of the current state of their brain health. Aerobic exercise significantly enhanced cognitive abilities while resistance training had a pronounced effect on executive function, memory, and working memory. The evidence is strong enough to recommend prescribing both types of exercise to improve brain health in the over 50s, say the researchers. The data showed that tai chi also improved cognitive abilities, which backs the findings of previously published studies, but the analysis was based on just a few studies, caution the researchers, so will need to be confirmed in a large clinical trial. Nevertheless, it's an important finding, they suggest, because exercises like tai chi may be suitable for people who are unable to do more challenging forms of physical activity. And in terms of how much and how often, the data analysis showed that a session lasting between 45 and 60 minutes, of moderate to vigorous intensity, and of any frequency, was good for brain health. The researchers point to some potential limitations of their review: their evidence was confined only to studies of supervised exercise and which had been published in English. Nevertheless, they conclude: "The findings suggest that an exercise programme with components of both aerobic and resistance type training, of at least moderate intensity and at least 45 minutes per session, on as many days of the week as possible, is beneficial to cognitive function in adults aged over 50."


(PRLEAP.COM) Louisville, KY. March 8, 2017. Louisville orthopedic surgeon and sports medicine physician Dr. Stacie L Grossfeld is welcoming Spanish speaking patients to her private medical practice Orthoapedic Specialists. In order to make this easier, Dr. Grossfeld recently hired staff member Ashley Milburn to join her team. Ms. Milburn, who is fluent in both English and Spanish, assists Spanish speaking patients with communicating with the doctor, understanding doctor's orders, translating paperwork and more.Ashley Milburn graduated from ATA College in Louisville, Kentucky. She completed the Limited Medical Radiography with Medical Assisting program (LMRMA) with an impressive 4.0 grade point average. During her time as a student, she did an externship at Dr. Grossfeld's medical practice, Orthopaedic Specialists. And when she finished her degree, Dr. Grossfeld invited her to join the team.Originally from Willisburg, Kentucky, Ms. Milburn grew up helping her family on a tobacco farm. During this time working with many Spanish-speaking farm employees, she became very interested in learning Spanish. Though she never received formal training, she is now a fluent Spanish speaker. She explains: "If you want to know what people are saying, you try hard to learn." Realizing the many benefits of speaking both English and Spanish, Ms. Milburn is also raising her three children to be bilingual.Along with her skills as a Medical Assistant and X-Ray Tech, Ashley's ability to speak Spanish has been a great skill for Orthopaedic Specialists. She enjoys helping Spanish-speaking clients. Describing her work, she explains: "I really enjoy helping people and it is great to help translate for someone who speaks Spanish. I love it when the Spanish-speaking patients tell me I speak Spanish well, and ask me what country I am from. They get really interested in how I learned it. It is a great feeling to be able to help people who might not be able to get the treatment they need."Along with working as a translator for Spanish-speaking patients, Milburn is currently working on translating all of the paperwork at Orthopaedic Specialists into Spanish including: surgery packets, pre-op and post-op instructions, sign in slips, new patient paperwork, and worker's compensation paperwork.Right now, Orthopaedic Specialist is accepting all new patients including those who are Spanish speakers . According to Milburn, most of the Spanish speaking patients they are currently serving at Orthopaedic Specialists are between the age of 30 and 60 years old. According to Louisville-area data, there are close to 30,000 Spanish-speaking people living in the Louisville Metro area with an average age of 27. Dr. Grossfeld is excited to be able to offer bilingual services to patients, and looks forward to providing orthopedic and sports medicine treatment to Spanish-speaking people in the Louisville, Kentucky area.Dr. Stacie L. Grossfeld is a double board-certified doctor in Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine. After graduating from the University Of Louisville School Of Medicine, she went on to complete her internship and residency at the University of Minnesota. She also completed a Sports Medicine fellowship at the Fowler-Kennedy Sports Medicine Center.Along with her work at her private medical practice, Orthopaedic Specialists, Dr. Grossfeld also mentors medical students who are interested in the field of orthopedic surgery and sports medicine through the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgery. She also works as an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at her alma mater – the University of Louisville School of Medicine.Outside of the medical field, Dr. Grossfeld spends time volunteering for various organizations in Louisville, KY. She is on the Board of Directors for both the YMCA at Norton Commons and the Louisville Sports Commission, where she also holds a chair position on the Louisville Active Committee. She also finds time to work with the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine as a mentor for prospective submissions. And she serves as an event doctor to numerous area sporting events including Derby City Cyclocross competitions.Dr. Grossfeld's dedication to making Louisville, KY, a better and healthier city for everyone expands across a wide variety of outlets which now includes offering professional orthopedic medical care to the city's Hispanic and Latino population. If you have been looking for an orthopedic medical office in Louisville, Kentucky, that serves the Spanish-speaking community, contact Orthoapedic Specialists today by calling 502-212-2663 or visiting them online


"Plain wrong" — this is what a new science editorial says of a widely believed idea that saturated fats clog up one’s arteries and result in coronary heart disease. Now the piece has stirred controversy among experts in the field and revived the longstanding clash over saturated fats and how they affect one’s health. “Despite popular belief among doctors and the public, the conceptual model of dietary saturated fat clogging a pipe is just plain wrong,” wrote a team of three cardiologists in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Standard medical advice maintains that saturated fats affect the blood cholesterol, the wax-like substance that can accumulate in one’s arteries. There are different types of cholesterol, from “good” or high-density lipoprotein (HDL) to “bad” or low-density lipoprotein (LDL). LDL cholesterol is believed to build up and lead to heart disease with too much saturated fat in one’s diet, or the animal-based fats found in pork, beef, chicken, cheese, butter, and other foods. According to the authors citing a meta-analysis or review of previous studies, eating these fats is not linked to coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke, type 2 diabetes, or heart disease death in healthy individuals. They dubbed it “misguided” to keep focusing on lowering plasma cholesterol “as if this was an end in itself,” as well as an emphasis on “low fat” diets and medications. Lead author Dr. Aseem Malhotra is a British cardiologist known in their local media to promote high-fat diets. His other report from last year was also controversial in its recommendation going against conventional advice. He and his coauthors noted to CNN that healthy people can reduce their coronary disease risk effectively by walking 22 minutes every day, managing their stress, and consuming “real food.” Critics of the new editorial, however, were quick to point out that meta-analyses are based on observational data, which aren’t deemed conclusive based on general standards and hardly establish causation. For Garry Jennings, cardiologist and chief medical advisor of the National Heart Foundation of Australia, the editorial is rife with “a mixture of truths, half-truths, and misconceptions,” pointing out a couple of “poor and discredited” research quoted to buoy the argument. Those with high LDL cholesterol suffer more heart attacks, and leaving LDL cholesterol out of the picture misleads readers, Jennings explained. Dr. Mike Knapton, the British Heart Foundation’s associate medical director, also called the opinion piece “misleading” in light of decades of studies proving that a saturated fat-rich diet raises “bad cholesterol” and puts one at a greater heart disease or stroke risk. According to the American Heart Association, a stroke or heart attack can start when plaque from cholesterol or fat builds up in the arteries and effectively “hardens” them. This is known as atherosclerosis, and in this scenario, either a blood clot forms or a portion of the plaque breaks off and blocks the artery. The editorial pointed to the importance of regular light exercise as well as the Mediterranean diet, which is high in so-called healthy fat such as nuts and olives. A recent study lauded this diet for a potentially lower rate of diagnosis of ADHD in children and adolescents. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | April 28, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

(Reuters Health) - Instead of eating less saturated fat and worrying about so-called bad cholesterol, a group of doctors suggests an alternative approach for preventing heart disease. More important, they say, is to focus on decreasing insulin resistance and inflammation in the body by targeting diet, exercise and reducing stress. "If we target all those three things together (plus) a reduction of smoking then we’ll combat 80 percent of all heart disease," said Dr. Aseem Malhotra of Lister Hospital in Stevenage, UK, who coauthored an editorial in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Saturated fats are mostly found in animal products like beef, pork, butter, cheese and other dairy. Blaming coronary artery disease on saturated fat that clogs arteries is "just plain wrong," according to Malhotra and his two coauthors, Dr. Rita Redberg of the University of California, San Francisco and Dr. Pascal Meier of University College London, UK. In their editorial, the three experts cite a 2015 review of past research that found no link between a diet full of saturated fats and an increased risk of coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke due to clogged arteries, death from coronary heart disease, or death from any cause. Furthermore, Malhotra told Reuters Health, the traditional advice to reduce levels of "bad" low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol through diet and exercise "is flawed." He and his colleagues point to studies in which people who replaced saturated fat with vegetable oils containing omega-6 fatty acids did lower their LDL and total cholesterol levels but still ended up with a higher rate of death. They also cite the well-known PREDIMED trial, in which people eating a Mediterranean diet with fats from olive oil or nuts were at lower risk of heart problems than people following a low-fat diet. Another trial found better outcomes in people following a Mediterranean diet than in people eating a typical French diet, despite similar LDL levels in both groups. The best way to predict heart disease risk, they write, is to look at patients' ratio of total cholesterol to "good" high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. A high ratio is linked with insulin resistance, which leads to high blood sugar and higher risks for heart disease, type 2 diabetes and obesity. Malhotra said insulin resistance is worsened when low-fat dieting leads people to eat more refined carbohydrates like white bread and white rice, which are not found in Mediterranean diets. He and his colleagues say Mediterranean diets, exercise and reducing stress all help combat inflammation. "I think the best way to reduce risk of heart disease and stay healthy is to concentrate on a heart-healthy Mediterranean style diet, regular physical activity and not smoking," Redberg told Reuters Health by email. Dr. Stephen Kopecky, a cardiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, agrees with the experts' inflammation theory but isn't ready to remove the emphasis on LDL cholesterol. Kopecky told Reuters Health that LDL levels are still an important measure to watch and treat with medications. Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, dean of the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston, also says LDL levels are still important. "I think the message is correct that we need more focus on diet and reducing inflammation," Mozaffarian told Reuters Health. "It doesn’t mean we should throw out an additional tool focusing on LDL cholesterol and treatment." Prevention doesn't involve a choice between lifestyle changes or lowering cholesterol, Mozaffarian added. "It's both," he said.


News Article | April 24, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

Aerobic exercise, resistance training (such as weight lifting), and tai chi can all boost brain function in people older than 50, concludes a review published today in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. Those mind-strengthening benefits even provided a boost to those who were already suffering from mild cognitive impairment, which is often a precursor to Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. The researchers also found that “multicomponent” programs--which combine aerobic exercise and resistance training as recommended by the U.S. Physical Activity Guidelines—were particularly effective in boosting brain health. Resistance training and aerobic exercise each release different types of compounds that “help support the growth of neurons in the brain,” says study author Joe Northey, a Ph.D. candidate in exercise physiology at the University of Canberra Research Institute for Sport and Exercise in Australia. “Doing both may be providing a ‘sweet spot’ for brain health.” “What’s good for the body is good for the brain,” says exercise physiologist and neuroscientist Dianna Purvis Jaffin, Ph.D., director of strategy and programs at the Brain Performance Institute at the University of Texas at Dallas. “We know that people who have higher levels of cardiovascular fitness tend to have larger brain volume, but both aerobic exercise and strength training are important.” If you’re thinking about starting a workout regimen (or amending your current routine), you can often find supervised programs through a hospital, community recreation center, or gym. But while the new study only included such supervised programs—where elements like frequency, intensity, and duration were monitored and controlled—you can reap these cognitive benefits by exercising on your own, too, says Northey. “Just discuss your plans to exercise with your doctor first to make sure it’s safe,” he says. To maximize the brain benefits of working out, keep these key takeaways from the study in mind: Include resistance training along with aerobic exercise. Current U.S. exercise guidelines recommend getting at least 150 minutes of moderate intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous intensity aerobic exercise a week and doing strength training two or three times weekly. (At a moderate level, you can maintain a conversation while you work out. During vigorous exercise, it will be difficult to talk.) Work out for 45 to 60 minutes per session. Researchers found the biggest benefit came from at least 45 minutes of exercise, although shorter sessions are certainly helpful as well. If you’re working out more intensely, you may be able to do it for less time. (Northey is currently studying how high-intensity interval training—alternating between hard and easy bouts of exercise—can impact brain power.) Exercise on most days. While the review found beneficial brain effects with any level of frequency of exercise, a regular, consistent routine will improve your fitness level and muscle mass, two things that are protective as you age. Consider starting with tai chi. Although there were fewer studies with tai chi, researchers found it does enhance cognitive abilities and it can be good for people who are new to working out or aren’t as mobile. (The study also looked at yoga, but researchers weren’t able to accurately gauge its impact on the brain due to a lack of good quality studies.) More from Consumer Reports: Top pick tires for 2016 Best used cars for $25,000 and less 7 best mattresses for couples Consumer Reports has no relationship with any advertisers on this website. Copyright © 2006-2017 Consumer Reports, Inc.


News Article | April 21, 2017
Site: marketersmedia.com

Tri Swim Coach, the leading triathlon swim training resource platform for triathletes, this week announced they have officially joined forces with Swim Box, a swim technique and stroke analysis company that brings together technology and their swim coaching expertise, in order to improve upon the individualized support provided to their athletes. Borne from a passion for helping athletes to train smarter, not harder, Tri Swim Coach offers an online program, Tri Swim Success, which helps triathletes improve their freestyle technique and speed in a step-by-step process. By partnering with Swim Box, they now have access to the company's streamlined technological infrastructure to make their available videos and training resources more helpful and interactive for their members. “Tri Swim Coach wants to help triathletes of every level befriend the water, and train in an efficient way that helps them achieve their triathlon goals,” said Kevin Koskella, head coach at Tri Swim Coach. “Since most triathletes don't have the time or access to high-caliber private coaching for their triathlon swimming performance, Tri Swim Coach offers an online triathlon swim training program with a step-by-step proven plan that is now going to have technological enhancement with our Swim Box collaboration.” By using Tri Swim Coach, triathletes undergo a progressive approach to triathlon swim training that incorporates several swim techniques and drills in the workouts, as well as utilizes videos, and swim stroke analysis. This enables athletes to get more out of their swim strokes, swim faster and more fluidly while using less energy in the water. Swim Box, presently partnered with Fast Track Sports Medicine & Performance Center, has the analytical technology to help swimmers pinpoint inefficiencies and improve performances tenfold. Together, the two companies look forward to many years of constructive collaboration in the swimming and triathlon training worlds. For more information on Tri Swim Coach, visit: http://www.triswimcoach.com. For more information on Swim Box, visit: http://www.theswimbox.com.


News Article | April 17, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Dr. Dan Lorenz of Specialists in Sports and Orthopedic Rehabilitation (SSOR), an Overland Park-based outpatient physical therapy facility, is an invited speaker at the Sanford Sports Medicine Symposium and the Sanford POWER Symposium April 28-29, 2017 in South Dakota. Dr. Lorenz joins an outstanding lineup of internationally-recognized speakers as part of their physical therapy and athletic performance course. Dr. Lorenz is Kansas City’s only fellowship-trained physical therapist in sports physical therapy and is a nationally recognized speaker on sports medicine. Dr. Lorenz will be giving a series of talks mostly focused on injury prevention and rehabilitation of the athletic patient. At the Sports Medicine Symposium, one talk will focus on single versus double leg training in athletes recovering from lower extremity injuries, specifically ACL reconstruction. An in-depth analysis of available evidence will be explored on the topic in order to give the rehabilitation professional guidance on how to best design exercise programming. The other presentation will be on screening and testing measures for upper extremity athletes to determine physical readiness for sport and performance enhancement training. In the Sanford POWER Clinic, Dr. Lorenz will be talking to a group of athletic trainers and strength coaches, again providing two talks for attendees. The first presentation is “Hey Mom, Where Did You Put My Off-Season?” The purpose of this talk is to discuss the risks of early sport specialization and the many issues and challenges that surround our current youth sports culture. The other presentation is “You Can’t Make the Club in the Tub.” In this talk, Dr. Lorenz explores evidence-based injury prevention measures for common youth sports injuries and will provide attendees with a framework to implement programming in their schools and with their respective teams. SSOR has locations in Overland Park and Prairie Village, KS. SSOR is in business to get the goal-oriented results quickly. For more information, see their website at http://www.ssorkc.com. For information on the Sanford POWER clinic: http://www.sanfordpower.com/power-to-hold-educational-clinics-in-april/ For information on the annual Sanford Sports Medicine Symposium: http://www.sanfordhealth.org/classes-and-events/courses/11th-annual-sanford-sports-medicine-symposium


News Article | April 22, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Kansas City Orthopaedic Institute surgeon Dr. Kirk McCullough and Dr. Dan Lorenz of Specialists in Sports & Orthopedic Rehabiliation (SSOR) are partnering up to present several talks at the Annual Big 12 Sports Medicine meeting to be held in Dallas, TX May 5th, 2017. Lorenz and McCullough will make quite the tandem, focusing on diagnosis and management of foot and ankle injuries in the athlete. Dr. McCullough is dual-fellowship trained in both Orthopaedic Sports Medicine and Orthopaedic Foot & Ankle, and Dr. Lorenz is Kansas City’s only Fellowship-trained Physical Therapist in Sports Physical Therapy. Dr. McCullough, a member of the NFL Foot and Ankle Subcommittee and Assistant Team Physician for the Kansas City Chiefs and Sporting KC, will discuss diagnosis and surgical management of athletic foot and ankle injuries. His talk will focus on current trends in treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures, Jones fractures, Lisfranc injuries, High Ankle Sprains and other common conditions in athletes. Dr. Lorenz, a nationally-recognized speaker in Sports Physical Therapy, will be giving two presentations at the meeting. The first will be on evidence-based screening and testing measures for lower extremity pathologies with particular emphasis on the foot and ankle. Following that, Dr. Lorenz will speak on performance enhancement following foot and ankle procedures in the athlete to maximize outcomes and return to play. To learn more about Dr. McCullough, visit http://www.orthosportskansascity.com/kirk-a-mccullough-m-d/. To learn more about Dr. Lorenz and SSOR, visit http://www.ssorkc.com. SSOR has locations in Overland Park and Prairie Village, KS to serve the needs of the community. Their central focus of treatment is manual therapy and exercise with a healthy mix of education and a positive environment to help their patients get results quickly.


— MediPoint: Sports Medicine Market - Global Analysis and Market Forecasts report is a specialized medical field that deals with understanding, diagnosing, and treating abnormalities in the joints, muscles, or skeletal structures as a result of sports or exercise. There has been a continuous increase in injuries due to sports and exercise, as society has realized the dangers of physical inactivity and significant effort has been made to discourage sedentariness. Therefore, sports medicine equally caters to professional athletes, as well as children and amateur adults who engage in an active lifestyle. Browse the 90 Tables and Figures, 10 Companies, Spread across 132 Pages Report Available at http://www.reportsnreports.com/contacts/discount.aspx?name=279553. The global market for arthroscopy, which encompasses 39 countries and includes implant and capital equipment, was valued at approximately USD4.19B in 2016. The market is expected to grow at a Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) of 4.6%, to reach a valuation of USD5.73B in 2023. The report MediPoint: Sports Medicine - Global Analysis and Market Forecasts” focuses on the market outlook for sports medicine implants and capital equipment that are commonly used across sports injury procedures. Implant fixation products include suture anchors, interference screws, and other meniscal implants covering the knee, shoulder, hip, and small joints. Orthopedic arthroscopic capital equipment products include shavers, arthroscopes, radiofrequency (RF) wands, visualization systems, fluid management systems, and fluid disposables. Scope of the Report: Overview of the sports medicine market, including reimbursement trends and competitive analysis. Annualized total market revenue by type of device, procedure trends, and market outlooks by region through 2023. Key topics covered include strategic competitor assessment, market characterization, identification of unmet needs, reimbursement considerations, evaluating market access in each region covered in the report, and implications of the emerging technologies on the market. Analysis of the current and future market competition in the global sports medicine market. Insightful review of the key industry drivers, barriers, and challenges. Each trend is independently researched to provide qualitative analysis of its implications. List of Tables Table 1: Metal Implant CharacteristicsThat Can Be Improved Table 2: Arthrex Shoulder Implants Table 3: Arthrex, Shoulder Instrumentation Table 4: Arthrex, Knee Sutures and Suture Anchors Table 5: Arthrex, Knee Graft Fixation Devices and Meniscal Products Table 6: Arthrex, Hip Implants and Instruments Table 7: Arthrex, Arthroscopy Procedure Capital Equipment Table 8: Arthrex, Implants SWOT Analysis Table 9: Arthrex, Instrumentation SWOT Analysis And More… List of Figures Figure 1: Sources of Orthopedic Trauma (%) (n=103) Figure 2: Global Company Shares for Arthroscopy, 2016 Figure 3: North America Company Shares for Arthroscopy, 2016 Figure 4: Europe Company Shares for Arthroscopy, 2016 Figure 5: APAC Company Shares for Arthroscopy, 2016 Figure 6: South America Company Shares for Arthroscopy, 2016 Figure 7: Middle East and Africa Company Shares for Arthroscopy, 2016 Figure 8: Global Arthroscopy Procedure Volume, by Geography, 2014-2023 Figure 9: Global Procedure Trend for Arthroscopy, by Implants, 2016 Figure 10: North America Procedure Trend for Arthroscopy, by Subsegment, 2016 And More… Place Order to This Report at http://www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=279553. About Us: ReportsnReports.com is your single source for all market research needs. Our database includes 500,000+ market research reports from over 95 leading global publishers & in-depth market research studies of over 5000 micro markets. With comprehensive information about the publishers and the industries for which they publish market research reports, we help you in your purchase decision by mapping your information needs with our huge collection of reports. For more information, please visit http://www.reportsnreports.com/reports/279553-medipoint-sports-medicine-global-analysis-and-market-forecasts.html

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