Center for Spinal Studies & Surgery

Nottingham, United Kingdom

Center for Spinal Studies & Surgery

Nottingham, United Kingdom
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PubMed | Center for Spinal Studies & Surgery, AO Fatebenefratelli e Oftalmico, Medtronic and OptumInsight
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Value in health : the journal of the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research | Year: 2015

Evaluate the cost-effectiveness of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) compared with open surgery (OS) techniques for one- or two-level lumbar spinal fusion in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spinal conditions in the United Kingdom and Italy.A health economic model was developed on the basis of results from a systematic literature review and meta-analysis to determine the cost-effectiveness of MIS compared with OS for lumbar spinal fusion. The analysis was conducted from a health care payer perspective. Parameters included in the model were surgery, blood loss, duration of hospitalization, postoperative complications, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Cost-effectiveness was determined by the incremental cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained.MIS was the dominant strategy compared with OS (i.e., yielding both cost savings and improved HRQOL). Cost savings were driven mainly by shorter length of hospital stay, reduced blood loss, and fewer complications such as surgical site infection. The total cost saving per procedure was 973 for Italy and 1666 for the United Kingdom, with an improvement of 0.04 quality-adjusted life-year over 2 years in HRQOL. One-way sensitivity analyses and predefined scenario(s) analyses confirmed the robustness of the model.MIS is a less expensive and a more effective treatment compared with OS for spinal lumbar fusion in both Italy and the United Kingdom. Lower downstream costs and increased HRQOL in the MIS group compensate for potential higher upfront costs of MIS implants and surgery equipment.

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