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Palma, Spain

Vicens D.,Speleo Club Mallorca | Pons G.X.,University of the Balearic Islands
Monografies de la Societat d'Historia Natural de les Balears | Year: 2011

A list of the invertebrate fossils found in karstic deposits in the Balearic Islands is presented in this paper. The knowledge we have about each island is different, and few data are available for Formentera and none for Cabrera. The fossil record is very incomplete and practically most taxa cited are from a group with calcareous exoskeleton, such as molluscs. The remaining taxa of other groups is very poor and anecdotal, but are cited in the Balearic Islands for the first time the presence of traces of a mineralised honeycomb (probably Apis mellifera), remains of an elytron belonging to an endemic coprophagic beetle (Thorectes balearicus) and also concretioned remains of Diplopoda. In Mallorca there are many sites that have supplied vertebrates compared to those with invertebrates. In Menorca the situation is different from Mallorca; there are more karstic sites, found on the surface, containing fossil fauna and both vertebrates and invertebrates have been studied. In Ibiza, despite having few localities, data on the invertebrate fossils are available from karstic sites as well as non karstic ones. Information regarding those karst sites where invertebrates are present is quite important, but only from a few caves (Cova de ca na Reia, Cova d'en Jaume Orat and Es Pouàs). This paper attempts to give an overview on the state of their knowledge, providing a list of sites where the presence of invertebrate fossils is recorded together with the taxa found in them; in addition some unpublished data are also supplied. Source


Vicens D.,Speleo Club Mallorca | Ginard A.,Societat dHistoria Natural de les Balears SHNB | Crespi D.,University of the Balearic Islands | Bover P.,CSIC - Mediterranean Institute for Advanced Studies | Gracia F.,University of the Balearic Islands
Bolleti de la Societat d'Historia Natural de les Balears | Year: 2011

The state of the art about speleogenetic, topographic and mining knowledge of the Sierra Na Burguesa (Tramuntana, Majorca) are given. Over 160 cavities are topographied. The most important is l'avenc de l'Infern with 827 m of round, the covota des Puig Gros de Bendinat with 593 m, the coves del Pilar with 531 m. About the depth, l'avenc de l'Infern with 132 m and l'avenc de sa Soca with 103 m are the most important. The cavities speleogenesis of the mountains is linked to the dissolution of carbonates and gypsum in the Secondary rocks. The mining activity to obtain plaster has been important from XVIII century. The mines are presented in the open or in galleries. Today, a lot of then are abandoned. Source


Gracia F.,Societat dHistoria Natural de les Balears | Fornos J.J.,University of the Balearic Islands | Vicens D.,Speleo Club Mallorca
Bolleti de la Societat d'Historia Natural de les Balears | Year: 2011

Coastal caves in southern Mallorca have abundant underwater continuations. Recent exploration and survey of those caves and submerged galleries highlights the genetic relationship between hydrology and karst. Most of the coastal caves result from the sea caves enlargement by wave erosion and the capture of neighbour karstic caves; additionally coastal freshwater springs result from the interference hydrological gradients between kartic cavities and the sea. Those littoral cavities represent the sea inland influence extension and are a key element of the Mallorca natural heritage. Source


Vicens D.,Speleo Club Mallorca | Vicens D.,University of the Balearic Islands | Gracia F.,University of the Balearic Islands | Balaguer P.,Societat dHistoria Natural de les Balears SHNB | And 4 more authors.
Monografies de la Societat d'Historia Natural de les Balears | Year: 2011

Littoral caves can be found at the erosion coasts of the Balearic Islands. The genesis of most of these caves are produced by the marine erosion and they are known as marine abrasion caves. These caves generally have small dimensions (usually no longer than 50 m), display ascending pro-files and can produce blowholes, tunnels and arches. Although they have initially nothing to do with karst, several karstic or karst-related processes can act on these caves, and speleothems, karstic fillings, dissolution phenomena, etc., can be observed inside them. Also cave fauna can be found. Source


Ginard A.,Speleo Club Mallorca | Gines A.,Societat dHistoria Natural de les Balears SHNB | Gines A.,University of the Balearic Islands | Vicens D.,Speleo Club Mallorca | Vicens D.,University of the Balearic Islands
Monografies de la Societat d'Historia Natural de les Balears | Year: 2011

The first speleological explorations in the Balearic Islands date back from the early XIXth century, years in which the activities were performed in a very precarious way, entering the caves with torches and descending the shafts with complicated systems of ropes and pulleys. In the past two centuries the evolution has been constant, embracing both the material used for the explorations as well as the technical training of the cavers. In order to contextualize the speleological explorations in the Balearic Islands, five different stages have been distinguished: the pre-speleology, or times prior to the birth of caving properly said; the pioneers epoch, in which leading figures of international renown must be highlighted; the Catalan caving campaigns, conducted in quite special brilliant moments of speleology in Catalonia; the conventional Mallorcan speleology period, was the explosion of caving in the Balearics characterized by a huge topographic activity and by the invaluable collaboration between different clubs of cavers; and, finally, the impact of underwater Mallorcan caving, stage that is marked by the beginning of the speleo-diving campaigns in the island and by outstanding explorations and discoveries of large cavities, such as Cova des Pas de Vallgornera and Cova de sa Gleda. The Federació Balear d'Espeleologia (Balearic Federation of Speleology) was not formed until 1982, however, a few years earlier, in 1972, the caving clubs were organized within the Balearic Delegation of the Comité Catalano-Balear d'Espeleologia. This year 2011, the Federació Balear d'Espeleologia has received the Ramon Llull award, which grants the Govern de les Illes Balears, in recognition of the valuable contributions to the scientific knowledge of our nature, made by many self-taught members of the federation and without any economic benefit. Source

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