Pasadena, CA, United States
Pasadena, CA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.50M | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Air Force has a need to develop a new class of advanced, wide field of view (WFOV), dual band infrared sensor that can be deployed on Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA), missile seekers and smart munitions. The Spectral Imaging Laboratory (SPILAB) proposes the development of a 120°WFOV, forward looking artificial compound eye (ACE) sensor for missile seekers and smart munitions, and a 220°Ultra-WFOV ACE sensor for aircraft. Both sensors will have simultaneous 3 - 5 um middle wavelength infrared (MWIR) and 8 - 10 um long wavelength infrared (LWIR) capabilities. Both sensors will be equipped with hyperacuity apertures in the foveal region to improve the accuracy of locating long range targets and to enhance the resolution of images. BENEFIT: The Ultra-WFOV ACE can enhance the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capability of the larger RPAs, and the forward looking, WFOV ACE can enhance the guidance, navigation and control of seekers and munitions. The wide angle capability eliminates the need for heavy gimbals and thereby reduces the overall size, weight, and power of seekers and munitions. The dual band capability enables the simultaneous imaging of cold bodies in the LWIR and hot surfaces or missile plumes in the MWIR.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Air Force has a need to develop a new forward looking infrared imaging system that can actively mitigate thermal loading associated with munitions flight speeds greater than Mach 5. Excessive thermal loading causes the viewing domes to emit a high background radiance, which reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the sensor below the level required for reliable guidance, navigation, and situational awareness. The Spectral Imaging Laboratory (SPILAB) will investigate the feasibility of developing a multiple aperture, artificial compound eye (ACE) sensor with active cooling throughout the dome structure to eliminate the problems associated with high temperature thermal loading. BENEFIT: The actively cooled ACE sensor will enable hypersonic missiles and munitions to navigate using wide angle imaging, and to target using forward looking infrared sensing. It will be useful for both Air-to-Surface and Air-to-Air missiles. The forward looking imaging capability will also be useful for commercial aircraft traveling at hypersonic speeds.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Air Force has a need to develop a wide-field-of-view (WFOV) multimode seeker with one mode being multi-waveband passive infrared imaging, and the second mode being a semi-active laser (SAL). The multimode system is required because of the continued need for military operations to be conducted in difficult urban environments were damage effects must be controlled through precision guidance of munitions. Given the highly cluttered nature of urban environments and associated problems with line-of-sight designation, additional precision can be obtained via passive infrared imaging provided from the flight vehicle. The additional image information would allow soldiers on the ground to adjust the laser designator spot accordingly and thereby increase the probability of correctly identifying and tracking targets from non-targets. The Spectral Imaging Laboratory (SPILAB) will investigate the feasibility of developing an infrared artificial compound eye (ACE) imaging sub-system that can be integrated with a SAL sub-system. The combined system will have a size, weight, and power (SWaP) well below the required 6in diameter, 5lb, and 50W. BENEFIT: The combined SAL/ACE system will enable soldiers in the field to designate targets with greater precision in cluttered urban environments. Commercial applications include surveillance activities in law enforcement, border control, homeland security. The ACE system alone will find applications in search and rescue, machine vision, robotics, and vehicle situational awareness/safety systems.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Air Force has a need to develop a new class of advanced, wide field of view (WFOV) imaging sensors that sample the radiation field in multiple modes: spectral, temporal, polarization, and detailed object shape. These multimodal sensors are to be deployed on high altitude drones to enhance their intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities. Smaller versions of the sensor are to be integrated with autonomous micro-air vehicles (MAV) to provide guidance, navigation, control and motion detection information within cluttered environments. The Spectral Imaging Laboratory (SPILAB) has teamed with the University of Arizona's Department of Neuroscience and College of Optical Sciences to investigate the development of the new sensor, taking inspiration from biological systems. The proposed optical portion of the sensor will combine the WFOV, multimodal compound eye attributes of mantis shrimps with the high resolution single aperture attributes of jumping spiders. The proposed neuromorphic processing portion of the sensor will be designed on the basis of known functional connections in the visual brain areas of insects and crotalid snakes. The integrated system is expected to provide high-speed motion detection, targeted distance information and camouflage deciphering against a cluttered background in daylight or darkness. BENEFIT: The proposed multimodal integrated vision system can provide the US Air Force with enhanced intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities on various aircraft. The wide angle optics coupled to a fast neuromorphic focal plane can enhance the guidance, navigation and control of seekers and autonomous vehicles. Commercial applications include surveillance, robotics, machine vision, and high end automobile collision avoidance systems, which can benefit from motion sensing, autonomous navigation, and distortion free, wide angle viewing without the need for focus adjustment.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2013

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Air Force has a need to improve stray light rejection and reduce the solar exclusion angle for space-based optical sensors tasked with star tracking navigation and with detecting and tracking multiple satellites. The Spectral Imaging Laboratory (SPILAB) proposes the development of artificial compound eye (ACE)optics with an internal honeycomb louver baffle that can block stray radiation from bright sources such as the sun. ACE optics have the benefit of generating high resolution, distortion free images that have uniform intensity across the field. SPILAB will design a wide field-of-view (WFOV-ACE) camera for full awareness, near field tracking and a high resolution (HR-ACE) camera for star tracking navigation and long range target tracking. BENEFIT: Will provide the military with systems that are highly relevant to Operationally Responsive Space (ORS) and Space Situational Awareness (SSA). Commercial applications include star tracking navigation within view of the sun, airborne surveillance requiring shielding from bright sources, and machine vision for manufacturing, robotics, and vehicle situational awareness/safety systems.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Air Force has a need to develop a new class of advanced, wide field of view (WFOV), dual band infrared sensors that can be deployed on Remotely Piloted Aircraft (RPA) as well as micro-air vehicles (MAVs), missile seekers and smart munitions. The Spectral Imaging Laboratory (SPILAB)proposes the development of a 120 degrees field-of-view artificial compound eye (ACE) sensor with simultaneous 3 - 5 um middle wavelength infrared (MWIR) and 8 - 10 um long wavelength infrared (LWIR) capability. BENEFIT: A nadir pointing version of the sensor can enhance the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capability of the larger RPAs, and a forward looking version can enhance the guidance, navigation and control of the MAVs, seekers, and munitions within cluttered urban environments. The WFOV capability will eliminate the need for heavy gimbals and thereby reduce the overall size, weight, and power of seekers and munitions. The dual band capability will enable the simultaneous imaging of cold bodies in the LWIR and hot surfaces or missile plumes in the MWIR.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 1.60M | Year: 2012

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Air Force has a need to develop small and agile strapdown (no-gimbal), wide-field-of-view (WFOV) seekers capable of precision guidance within cluttered urban environments. The Spectral Imaging Laboratory (SPILAB) proposes the development of both long wavelength infrared (LWIR) and middle wavelength infrared (MWIR) artificial compound eye (ACE) optical systems that can be coupled to LWIR and MWIR camera modules. ACE wide angle optics have the benefit of generating high resolution, distortion free images that have uniform intensity across the field. The SPILAB ACE design includes a honeycomb louver baffle that can block stray radiation from bright sources such as the sun and flares. BENEFIT: Will provide the military with infrared wide angle seekers that can be used in small weapon/aircraft systems engaged in combat and Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions. Commercial applications include surveillance activities in law enforcement, search and rescue, border control, and homeland security. Other commercial applications include machine vision for manufacturing, robotics, and vehicle situational awareness/safety systems.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2014

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Air Force has a need to develop a new forward looking infrared imaging system that can actively mitigate thermal loading associated with munitions flight speeds greater than Mach 5. Excessive thermal loading causes the viewing domes to emit a high background radiance, which saturates the sensor and reduces the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) below the level required for reliable targeting, guidance, navigation, and situational awareness. During Phase 1, the Spectral Imaging Laboratory (SPILAB) designed and analyzed a bio-inspired, multiple aperture seeker that can utilize active cooling throughout the viewing apertures to eliminate the problems associated with high temperature thermal loading. During Phase 2, SPILAB will build a prototype for hypersonic wind tunnel testing to confirm that a multiple aperture seeker can view through a hot bow wave. BENEFIT: The actively cooled, multi-aperture seeker will enable hypersonic missiles and munitions to navigate and target using forward looking infrared sensing. The seeker will be useful for both Air-to-Surface and Air-to-Air missiles. The forward looking imaging capability will also be useful for future aircraft traveling at hypersonic speeds.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 375.00K | Year: 2014

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Air Force has a need to develop a wide-field-of-view (WFOV) multimode seeker with one mode being multi-waveband passive infrared imaging, and the second mode being a semi-active laser (SAL). The multimode system is required because of the continued need for military operations to be conducted in difficult urban environments were damage effects must be controlled through precision guidance of munitions. Given the highly cluttered nature of urban environments and associated problems with line-of-sight designation, additional precision can be obtained via passive infrared imaging provided from the flight vehicle. The additional image information would allow soldiers on the ground to adjust the laser designator spot accordingly and thereby increase the probability of correctly identifying and tracking targets from non-targets. The Spectral Imaging Laboratory (SPILAB) will develop a dual resolution, WFOV infrared seeker that can be integrated with a SAL sub-system. The combined system will have a size, weight, and power (SWaP) below the required 5 inch diameter, 5 lbs, and 50 W. BENEFIT: The combined infrared seeker/SAL system will enable soldiers in the field to designate targets with greater precision in cluttered urban environments. Commercial applications include surveillance activities in law enforcement, border control, homeland security. The infrared seeker system alone will find applications in search and rescue, machine vision, robotics, and vehicle situational awareness/safety systems.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 750.00K | Year: 2014

ABSTRACT: The U.S. Air Force has a need to develop a new class of advanced, wide field of view (WFOV) imaging sensors that sample the radiation field in multiple modes: spectral, temporal, polarization, and detailed object shape. These multimodal sensors are to be deployed on high altitude drones to enhance their intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities. Smaller versions of the sensor are to be integrated with autonomous micro-air vehicles (MAV) to provide guidance, navigation, control and motion detection information within cluttered environments. The Spectral Imaging Laboratory (SPILAB) has teamed with the University of Arizona's Department of Neuroscience and College of Optical Sciences to develop two types of bio-inspired multimodal sensors, one operating in the visible wavelength regime and the other operating in the infrared wavelength regime. The visible sensor couples a WFOV compound array optical system to a division of focal plane polarimeter with 4 types of broadband, elliptical micro-polarizers designed to optimally sample the Stokes vector. The infrared sensor couples a cryo-cooled infrared focal plane to a WFOV compound array optical system with a foveal region that can be used for multi-spectral, multi-polarization imaging. Both sensors will have a neuromorphic processing capability designed on the basis of known functional connections in the visual brain areas of insects and crotalid snakes. The integrated system is expected to provide high-speed motion detection, targeted distance information and camouflage deciphering against a cluttered background in daylight or darkness. BENEFIT: The proposed multimodal integrated vision system can provide the US Air Force with enhanced intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities on various aircraft. The wide angle optics coupled to a fast neuromorphic focal plane can enhance the guidance, navigation and control of seekers and autonomous vehicles. The infrared multi-spectral polarimeter can be used for detecting buried improvise explosive devices (IEDs). Commercial applications include surveillance, robotics, machine vision, and high end automobile collision avoidance systems, which can benefit from motion sensing, autonomous navigation, and distortion free, wide angle viewing without the need for focus adjustment.

Loading Spectral Imaging Laboratory collaborators
Loading Spectral Imaging Laboratory collaborators