Space Generation Advisory Council

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Space Generation Advisory Council

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Lauren Napier J.,Space Generation Advisory Council | Arnoczb I.,Space Generation Advisory Council
Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC | Year: 2016

Since the successes of private companies such as Space X in the aerospace sector, the privatization of this sector has become a topic of interest. Today more and more people are turning toward innovative ideas and entrepreneurship, including students and young professionals. The aim of this paper is to discuss such trends in the aerospace sector at the international level. Before discussing the current and future trends for aspiring entrepreneurs in the aerospace sector, it is important to note the background of aerospace entrepreneurship. This includes a brief overview of the concept of privatization of space with key examples from the sub-sectors of rocketry, suborbital flights, and space tourism. Though these upstream (rocketry, satellites, etc.) sub-sectors are attractive, it is important to note that for young entrepreneurs the future can lie in downstream applications such as Earth Observation or data analysis. Along with government and space agency initiatives to incubate startups, many entrepreneurs now have access to space without having access to millions of dollars. However there are still roadblocks that can be found along the way. The main purpose of this paper is to discuss these roadblocks to startup success in the aerospace sector, especially for young entrepreneurs, and how to potentially overcome such issues through solutions. These potential roadblocks include: access to appropriate information for innovating the sector; understanding the legal, political and governmental issues in space; how to find investors; how to find the right skills or use the right skills to build up the startup; how to connect with corporates; and overall how to understand the market in order to optimize success. Additionally there will be a short discussion on what else is needed in the aerospace sector in order for young entrepreneurs to succeed. This includes the potential for more space-based incubators, more space angels, and more initiatives through space agencies and larger corporations. The time is now for young professionals to find a way to change the world. Innovations, ideas, leadership, and passion can go a long way to make space what we need for the future. However, there is a need to understand the market and how to navigate through it in order to succeed as a private space entity and space entrepreneur. Copyright © 2016 by the International Astronautical Federation (IAF). All rights reserved.


Ciaramicoli M.,Space Generation Advisory Council
61st International Astronautical Congress 2010, IAC 2010 | Year: 2010

Space-based applications and services for disaster management will become increasingly essential during crises, yet many organizations are unaware of their potential. In an effort to promote awareness of the benefits of space for disaster management, bring the associated views of youth to international bodies, and provide opportunities for volunteerism to its members, the Space Generation Advisory Council's (SGAC) Group on Space Technologies for Disaster Management was created. This paper presents the evolution and goals of this SGAC initiative, along with activities from its first year of operation. Strategic plans for the coming year are also discussed, and required resources to achieve future objectives are presented.


Cornell A.,Space Generation Advisory Council
61st International Astronautical Congress 2010, IAC 2010 | Year: 2010

There have been significant changes and shifting of trends from the 1990's to the 2000's that have affected the American space industry. The 1990's and 2000's were marked by important changes in the structure of the space industry and the approaches to the globalization of space. These changes were by no means preemptive but rather reactions to key events that have shaped the American space industry significantly. In particular, there are five important events which contributed to the key shifts in the American space industry since the end of the Cold War: • the consolidation of the aerospace and defense industry in the 1990s; • the charging of Boeing (Hughes) and Space Systems/Loral with the violation of the Arms Export Control Act and the International Traffic in Arms Regulation (ITAR) following the failed 1995 and 1996; • the creation of entrepreneur, Elon Musk's, SpaceX Corporation in 2002; • the collision of the US's Iridium 33 and Russia's Kosmos 2251 satellites in 2009; and • the cancellation of NASA's Constellation program in 2010 and President Obama's new space program proposal. These events did not just affect traditional aspects of the space industry like the industry structure or supply and demand. They are also important because they represent shifts in the way the American space industry has needed and will need to change to react to geopolitical developments. When analyzed in a connected context, these events demonstrate the larger trends of the two decades. Through these events put into a the 20-year view, one sees that 1990s was a transition period for the US as the country was emerging from the Cold War; the 2000s, on the other hand, was a decade of adapting to the fact that space had a much more international sector. Innovation and staying involved in space policy development were becoming important.


Cornell A.,Space Generation Advisory Council
61st International Astronautical Congress 2010, IAC 2010 | Year: 2010

In June 2009, the Space Generation Advisory Council in Support of the United Nations Programme on Space Applications (SGAC) held its Ten Year Anniversary Conference. The point of the conference was to reflect on the previous ten years in the global space sector and to analyze current trends to help make plans and goals for the next decade forward. In particular, as SGAC is a non-governmental organization established to represent the up and coming global leaders of the space sector (broadly 18-35 year olds), the conference participants gave recommendations from the youth. Specifically, the participants gave three sets of recommendations for the next ten years: what the key global space development goals should be, how the youth should contribute, and how SGAC should contribute. While these recommendations are strong, the key to any recommendation for action is prioritization of plans. This paper will analyze the three groups of recommendations from two angles: which goals are most needed and which goals are most challenging to tackle. Each goal will be rated with respect to the other goals in the group (1 = most needed or least challenging and 3 or 4 = least needed or most challenging) and then placed on a graph for visualization. This analysis aims to plot how to best prioritize to mobilize the recommendations from the SGAC Ten Year Anniversary Conference.


Cornell A.,Space Generation Advisory Council
62nd International Astronautical Congress 2011, IAC 2011 | Year: 2011

Throughout the modern Space Age, we have seen that space is a place of scientific and strategic awe. To operate in space, traditionally a country has had to be an international superpower with political stability and financial wealth that would allow its government to drive such a scientific cutting-edge program. Moreover, particularly during the Cold War, governments needed gall and ambition. These conditions widely known, governments aiming to enter the realm of space have looked to take advantage of the domestic and international showing of strength. It is true that space has the ability to inspire, but as a science or technology, is its development different than any other high technology or science? The Diffusions of Innovations Model (also known as "Roger's Bell Curve") and technology development chains associated with the model suggest a clear "no." The framework, which emerged in the mid-20 th century but enjoyed recent revival in studying the hi-tech boom at the turn of the 21st century, aims to explain how technology diffuses dirough the user community. The population in the end is broken into five segments: Innovators, Early Adaptors, Early Majority, Late Majority and Laggards. The model, when applied to modern space sciences, can also help gain insight into the development of the modern space age. While domestic and international demonstration of strength has been a common thread over the past half century, the Diffusion of Innovation Model shows that, in fact, the key reasons for when and why countries have entered into the space sector have shifted as the technology has developed. Further, these models also can provide insight as to how the modern space sector structure could develop as industry begins to play a more pivotal role in the space sector in both launching services and space applications.


Maier P.,Space Generation Advisory Council
Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC | Year: 2013

The rise, development and continuance of industrial sectors and regions are dependent on numerous factors and their complex interactions. However, an understanding of basic correlations is essential to support sustainable politico-economic as well as corporate strategic decisions. Therefore different models have been developed and are used to describe dynamics of markets and industry, taking into account factors such as demand conditions, rivalry, infrastructure and available workforce, support industry availability, and regulatory regimes. However, many of these factors evolved over time, in a distinct way for every region, leading to distinct sets of factor characteristics and industry situations. Furthermore, cultural backgrounds of individuals in the industry, in the industry's home base and of policy makers play an important role in shaping markets and industries that is often undervalued. Due to, for example, common laws and regulations, and a partly shared history, it is convenient to choose individual nations as underlying regions for an analysis of historical and cultural influences. While other researchers focus on different regions, this paper will therefore conduct an assessment of the historical and cultural context underlying the development of entrepreneurship and investment for Germany. ©2013 by the International Astronautical Federation. All rights reserved.


Mijovic M.,Space Generation Advisory Council
Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC | Year: 2015

Having in mind that property rights, such as ownership right and right of use, are not regulated in detail by Space law legislation, one has to raise a question - can we regulate property rights outside Earth. At the very beginning, I will express my personal stand on Space law in general, its development and place among other legal branches. I will try to state certain impressions, which I believe, should be addressed properly. My paper shall revisit the basic principles of property law; what is an ownership, how does one acquire it or transfer it to another individual. One of the issues shall relate to a question can we simply copy-paste property laws applicable to Earth into the Space. Other theoretical questions will be dealt in my paper, including but not limited to: if the humans cannot have properties in Space, can we claim the Earth? Why would different laws apply on Earth and in Space? Or maybe one should emphasize this difference between Earth law and Space law? In addition to this, I will present two theories regarding mentioned problem. Further on, does one has to redefine the institutes of property law, including, inter alia, division into movables and immovables, having in mind the different conditions on Earth and in Space, such as gravity. With regard to breathable air being used in Space, can we charge the same, having in mind the respective costs? Fast development in Space technology, e.g. space mining will ultimately bring this issue to the table. And it has already begun. Numerous articles and announcement by space capable countries and companies, announcing plans to undergo these missions. The race has begun; not an arms race, but the race to establish more defined legal framework outside the Earth. Also, the technology is here, but the question is raised: can we, in legal sense, keep up? Copyright © 2015 by the International Astronautical Federation. All rights reserved.


Ndiritu M.K.,Space Generation Advisory Council | O'Sullivan S.C.,Space Generation Advisory Council
Proceedings of the International Astronautical Congress, IAC | Year: 2015

Youths are the majority of the current population, and there is need to harness their potential to contribute in Disaster Risk Reduction efforts. Space Technology for Disaster Management (STDM) is a project designed by Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC) to build the capacities in young professionals and students particularly with applications of Space Technology and other sciences that contribute in Disaster Risk Reduction strategies. The key focus for this project is to fill the existing gaps in the overall cycle of Disaster Risk Management. The project is pursuing international cooperation to enhance mainstreaming of youths and their valuable contributions in the current strategies. Even though the focus is on use of space technology, it has become clear that there is vital need for communities' involvement in the process. The project is therefore considering training users with open source software to address hazards/disasters; and designing ways on how the models produced to predict disasters could be made more user-friendly to serve the communities who bear the direct effects of disasters when they strike. As this is a global platform, we are mobilizing a pool of young experts, both on technical and policy approaches, so that sufficient capacity can be realized in reducing loss of lives and property arising from disasters. A pilot project is presented in this paper with rough results. The project aims to streamline its approaches with national, regional and global strategies such as the recently adopted Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction building on the Hyogo Framework of Action; particularly on generating usable early warning systems that are easily interpretable by the communities. The project is seeking to augment the approaches of the UNSPIDER particularly in equipping young professionals and students to invent better models for hazard Early Warning Systems for preparedness and prevention purposes. Current collaborations are being pursued with inter-governmental organizations and few other Commercial companies with an objective to enhance Public Private Partnerships in DRR processes. We seek to build more networks on international cooperation for concerted efforts in DRR in a more sustainable way to achieve the overarching objectives of the global Disaster Risk Reduction Strategy. This year the project has attracted a pool of 25 members and is recruiting more. We will keep a database of these experts each year to enhance knowledge sharing and technology transfer for sustainable results. Copyright © 2015 by the International Astronautical Federation.


Though unremarkable to some, the 1990s and 2000s saw important events and changes in the U.S. space sector. These changes were by no means preemptive but rather reactions to key events. This paper studies five moments over the two decades that have shaped the American space industry significantly. The author explains how these events have affected change and indicated shifting trends. The shifts examined are those in the American space industry's structure as well as its approach to innovation and to the globalization of the space sector. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: phys.org

The main goal of PMAS 2017 is to conduct research that could someday be crucial for future astronauts living and working on the Martian surface. During their stay inside the dome, the analogue crew will carry out a variety of experiments in the field of geology, biology, psychology, agriculture, and astronomy. Working in full isolation, the mission team will conduct experiments and measurements in and around the habitat and the nearby exploration site. They will log their activities and report everything to the Mission Support Center (MSC) located in Torun, Northern Poland, some 330 miles (531 kilometers) away from the M.A.R.S. dome. "Mission Support will provide the astronauts with all necessary information and an optimised daily schedule that say which experiment or activity should be conducted in order to not exceed, for example, the limited power supply of the habitat," Sebastian Hettrich, PMAS 2017 Project Lead and Mission Director, told SpaceFlight Insider. PMAS 2017 is managed by the Space Generation Advisory Council (SGAC) in support of the United Nations Program on Space Applications. SGAC is a global nonprofit, non-governmental organization and network representing university students and young space professionals to the United Nations, space agencies, industry, and academia. SGAC believes the PMAS 2017 mission will be unique among other Mars analogue simulations, as it will focus on human-robotic interactions. Future human exploration of the Red Planet will require significant help from robots to assist astronauts carrying out their experiments. Therefore, during their two-week stay, PMAS 2017 participants will test such technologies as cameras on rovers and mobility systems that could be necessary for future operations on the Martian surface. Hettrich said a usual workday for a PMAS astronaut will be basically like a normal working day, except that the participants live together with their colleagues for the entire mission duration. "They get up, have breakfast and a morning meeting together, where they view and discuss the schedule for the day, before they start with the scientific work," Hettrich said. "With a crew of six astronauts, three of them could go outside for an extra-vehicular activity, while the other three should stay inside, occupying the communication station, maintaining the habitat and working in the laboratory to analyse the samples from the previous day." The astronauts' only communication with the outside world will be through a time-delayed link – 15 minutes – simulating a real communication delay due to the distance between Earth and Mars. Besides mimicking a real Mars mission, PMAS 2017 will also include a three-day lunar simulation in partnership with the European Space Agency (ESA). During the lunar mission phase, the communication with the MSC will be in near real-time. Characteristic of space exploration simulations, PMAS 2017 will also study how isolation and a high degree of anxiety and stress may affect the crew during a hazardous deep space mission. The interactions among crew members will be monitored to gain a better understanding of the psychological issues they may face. "Some people might be put off by the idea of being isolated in a dome for two weeks with five strangers and no social media, but I think it sounds like great fun, and I'm hugely looking forward to finding out what it's like to be part of a mission crew," Yael Kisel, PMAS 2017 analogue astronaut, told SpaceFlight Insider. Hettrich said that isolation is always an issue when being confined in a small habitat with the same five faces for a duration of two weeks without real-time communication with the outside. "This, for sure, can lead to some tension; for example, within the crew, when two astronauts have different opinions on how to analyse a sample correctly. And that happens in most missions, also in real space missions – or that the astronaut crew creates a 'we against them' [attitude] toward the Mission Support Team," Hettrich said. The PMAS 2017 project is currently in the stage of raising money. The team started a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo to collect the necessary funds needed to start the mission. They aim to raise $30,000. Explore further: Return to the underwater Space Station

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