Southwestern Medical School

Dallas, TX, United States

Southwestern Medical School

Dallas, TX, United States
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News Article | May 8, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

U.S. Dermatology Partners (“USDP”), formerly known as Dermatology Associates, is pleased to announce that it recently partnered with North Texas Dermatology (“NTD”), with locations in Plano and Richardson, TX. The transaction closed in early May 2017. U.S. Dermatology Partners is a dermatology-focused physician services and management organization providing premier dermatologic care. Located in Plano, TX, NTD cares for patients via four board-certified dermatologists and three physician assistants. NTD’s providers offer a full suite of clinical, surgical and cosmetic services. NTD has served patients in greater North Texas for more than 15 years. With the addition of NTD, USDP now has [27] board-certified dermatologists and [15] locations in the Dallas-Forth Worth area, further extending its leading market share. Dr. Susanne Lockhart, a board-certified dermatologist, has been in private practice in North Dallas since 2000. She earned her Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, TX, and was awarded membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. Dr. Lockhart then went on to complete her internal medicine internship at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, TX, and completed her dermatology residency at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston where she served as chief resident. Dr. Christie Matter received her medical degree from the University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, TX, where she graduated with honors and was awarded membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. She completed an internal medicine internship at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas, before receiving her dermatology training at Duke University Medical Center and Southwestern Medical School. She served as Chief Dermatology Resident at Parkland Hospital. Dr. Matter is a board-certified dermatologist and has been in private practice in Plano, TX since 1999. A native Texan,Dr. Rachel Quinby is a board-certified dermatologist who joined North Texas Dermatology in 2005. Before that time, she spent a year as a visiting assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, VA. Prior to that, she was an assistant professor of dermatology at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, IL. She earned her Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical School, and completed her dermatology residency at Northwestern University in Chicago, where she served as Chief Resident during her last year. Dr. Carla Gustovich, a board-certified dermatologist, grew up in Dallas, TX and has been in private practice since 2004. She received her Doctor of Medicine degree from The University of Texas Health Science Center in Houston, TX, and then remained in Houston to complete her internship at LBJ Hospital before returning to Dallas to complete her residency. Dr. Gustovich completed her dermatology residency at the University of Texas at Southwestern in Dallas at Parkland Hospital, where she served as Chief Resident. Joining the physicians of North Texas Dermatology are their highly experienced Physician Assistants: Pam Murray, PA; Julie Darby, MPAS, PA-C; and Kristine Kucera, PA-C, MPAS, DHS. “We are honored to partner with the outstanding team at NTD,” said Geoff Wayne, CEO of U.S. Dermatology Partners. “Joining together will improve the patient experience and strengthen our market-leading position in the DFW metroplex. Our mission is to ensure improved access to the best dermatology care in our communities, and NTD bolsters our ability to do just so by adding such well-respected providers and convenient locations.” If you would like more information about U.S. Dermatology Partners, or if you have any questions regarding the partnership with NTD, please contact one of the team members listed below: About U.S. Dermatology Partners Headquartered in Dallas, TX, U.S. Dermatology Partners provides comprehensive practice management services to over 85 board-certified dermatologists across 58 locations in Texas, Kansas and Missouri. U.S. Dermatology Partners is focused solely on supporting providers so that they can focus exclusively on delivering high-quality, medically-focused care to patients. U.S. Dermatology Partners is making it easier for people to connect with a dermatologist and gain access to the very latest in dermatology care for the entire family and state-of-the-art treatment for diseases of the skin. As the 3rd largest physician-owned dermatology practice in the United States, patients not only have access to general medical, surgical and cosmetic skin treatments through its coordinated care network, but also benefit from the practice’s strong dermatology subspecialty thought leaders and medical advisory board. To be the best partners to its patients, U.S. Dermatology Partners is fervently focused on providing the highest level of patient-first care, and its team therefore includes recognized national leaders in sub-specialties including psoriasis and Mohs surgery. To learn more visit usdermatologypartners.com About ABRY Partners Founded in 1989 and headquartered in Boston, Massachusetts, ABRY Partners is an experienced and successful private equity investment firm focused on media, communications, healthcare services, insurance services, business and information services. Since its founding, ABRY has completed more than $62 billion of transactions, representing investments in more than 550 properties.


Roland C.L.,Southwestern Medical School | Roland C.L.,University of Texas at Dallas | Dineen S.P.,Southwestern Medical School | Dineen S.P.,University of Texas at Dallas | And 9 more authors.
Experimental Biology and Medicine | Year: 2010

Tumor infiltration of immune cells (polymorphonuclear cells [PMNs] and macrophages) was initially thought to be an attempt by the host organism to combat malignancy. It appears, however, that certain subsets of chronically activated immune cells likely promote tumor growth, facilitate tumor cell survival and aid in metastasis. The association between tumor cells and tumor-associated PMNs has been demonstrated in several types of cancer, but the presence of tumor-associated PMNs in pancreatic cancer has not been well studied in vivo. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) functions in cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion and has a physiological role in PMN tight adhesion of leukocytes via interaction with the ligands LFA-1 and Mac-1. Increased ICAM-1 expression correlates with poor prognosis in pancreatic cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the function of ICAM-1 and tumor-associated PMNs in pancreatic cancer progression using ICAM-1-null (ICAM-1-/-) mice. We hypothesize that ICAM-1 null mice have decreased pancreatic cancer progression. Surprisingly, there is no significant difference in pancreatic cancer progression in wild-type versus ICAM-1 null mice. Interestingly, we found that tumor-derived ICAM-1 co-localizes with host PMNs at the leading edge of the tumor in ICAM-1 null mice. These results suggest that tumor-derived ICAM-1 is a sufficient ligand for tumorassociated PMNs and may play a role in subsequent tumor growth and metastasis. Copyright © 2010 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.


Morey A.F.,Southwestern Medical School | Watkin N.,St Georges Hospital | Shenfeld O.,Shaare Zedek Medical Center | Eltahawy E.,Ain Shams University | Giudice C.,Hospital Italiano
Urology | Year: 2014

The management of primary and recurrent bulbar urethral stricture disease has been a source of controversy with the choice being between endoscopic urethrotomy and open urethroplasty. Further debate exists with regard to the choice of urethroplasty - either excision and primary anastomosis (EPA) or augmentation with a graft or flap. Using PubMed, a 35-year literature search was conducted (1975-2010) for peer-reviewed articles on bulbar strictures treated using EPA. Exclusions included articles with <10 patients, duplications, reviews, or in which the cohort was mixed and the data could not be separately analyzed. Seventeen articles fulfilled the criteria with a total of 1234 patients. Overall success was 93.8%. Reported complications were <5%, and there was no evidence of persistent loss of sexual function. The authors conclude that EPA is associated with a high success rate with low complication rate. Our recommendation is that it should be performed in patients with short isolated bulbar strictures, when expected success rates of other procedures are <90%. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | St Georges Hospital, Hospital Italiano, Ain Shams University, Shaare Zedek Medical Center and Southwestern Medical School
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Urology | Year: 2014

The management of primary and recurrent bulbar urethral stricture disease has been a source of controversy with the choice being between endoscopic urethrotomy and open urethroplasty. Further debate exists with regard to the choice of urethroplasty--either excision and primary anastomosis (EPA) or augmentation with a graft or flap. Using PubMed, a 35-year literature search was conducted (1975-2010) for peer-reviewed articles on bulbar strictures treated using EPA. Exclusions included articles with <10 patients, duplications, reviews, or in which the cohort was mixed and the data could not be separately analyzed. Seventeen articles fulfilled the criteria with a total of 1234 patients. Overall success was 93.8%. Reported complications were <5%, and there was no evidence of persistent loss of sexual function. The authors conclude that EPA is associated with a high success rate with low complication rate. Our recommendation is that it should be performed in patients with short isolated bulbar strictures, when expected success rates of other procedures are <90%.


Young E.J.,Michael bakey Veterans Affairs Medical Center | Young E.J.,Baylor College of Medicine | Hasanjani Roushan M.R.,Babol Medical University | Shafae S.,Babol Medical University | And 2 more authors.
Human Pathology | Year: 2014

As a major organ of the mononuclear phagocytic system, the liver is probably involved in all cases of brucellosis. In this prospective study, liver slides prepared from percutaneous liver biopsy samples of 20 patients with clinical and laboratory evidence of acute brucellosis due to Brucella melitensis were examined for the presence or absence of granulomas by pathologists in Iran and the United States. Nineteen men and one woman ranging in age from 14 to 62 years were studied. All patients had clinical signs and symptoms compatible with acute brucellosis, and all had significantly elevated titers of antibodies to Brucella in their serum. Liver function tests were mildly elevated in 11 (55%) cases, and C-reactive protein was positive in 15 (65%) patients. Thirteen (65%) patients had blood cultures positive for B melitensis. Iranian and American pathologists reported granulomas in 3 (15%) and in 4 (20%) cases, respectively. There was agreement between Iranian and American pathologists in 17 (85%) cases. The most prevalent findings were mild portal or lobular lymphocytic inflammation (16 cases). Two cases revealed noncaseating epithelioid granulomas, and 2 had microgranulomas. The results show that all patients had microscopic evidence of liver involvement. The predominant histologic finding was mild portal or lobular inflammation with lymphocytes. Granulomas were present in only 4 cases. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Southwestern Medical School, Babol Medical University and Baylor College of Medicine
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Human pathology | Year: 2014

As a major organ of the mononuclear phagocytic system, the liver is probably involved in all cases of brucellosis. In this prospective study, liver slides prepared from percutaneous liver biopsy samples of 20 patients with clinical and laboratory evidence of acute brucellosis due to Brucella melitensis were examined for the presence or absence of granulomas by pathologists in Iran and the United States. Nineteen men and one woman ranging in age from 14 to 62 years were studied. All patients had clinical signs and symptoms compatible with acute brucellosis, and all had significantly elevated titers of antibodies to Brucella in their serum. Liver function tests were mildly elevated in 11 (55%) cases, and C-reactive protein was positive in 15 (65%) patients. Thirteen (65%) patients had blood cultures positive for B melitensis. Iranian and American pathologists reported granulomas in 3 (15%) and in 4 (20%) cases, respectively. There was agreement between Iranian and American pathologists in 17 (85%) cases. The most prevalent findings were mild portal or lobular lymphocytic inflammation (16 cases). Two cases revealed noncaseating epithelioid granulomas, and 2 had microgranulomas. The results show that all patients had microscopic evidence of liver involvement. The predominant histologic finding was mild portal or lobular inflammation with lymphocytes. Granulomas were present in only 4 cases.


PubMed | Southwestern Medical School
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Archives of pathology & laboratory medicine | Year: 2011

Timely and accurate diagnosis of hematologic malignancies is crucial to appropriate clinical management. Acute leukemias are a diverse group of malignancies with a range of clinical presentations, prognoses, and preferred treatment protocols. Historical classification systems relied predominantly on morphologic and cytochemical features, but currently, immunophenotypic, cytogenetic, and molecular data are incorporated to define clinically relevant diagnostic categories. Multiparameter flow cytometry provides rapid and detailed determination of antigen expression profiles in acute leukemias which, in conjunction with morphologic assessment, often suggests a definitive diagnosis or a narrow differential. Many recurrent molecular or cytogenetic aberrations are associated with distinct immunophenotypic features, and therefore flow cytometry is an important tool to direct further testing. In addition, detection of specific antigens may have prognostic or therapeutic implications even within a single acute leukemia subtype. After initial diagnosis, a leukemias immunophenotypic fingerprint provides a useful reference to monitor response to therapy, minimal residual disease, and recurrence.To provide an overview of the application of flow cytometric immunophenotyping to the diagnosis and management of acute leukemias, including salient features of those entities described in the 2008 World Health Organization classification.Published articles pertaining to flow cytometry, acute leukemia classification, and experiences of a reference flow cytometry laboratory.Immunophenotypic evaluation is essential to accurate diagnosis and classification of acute leukemia. Multiparameter flow cytometry provides a rapid and effective means to collect this information, as well as providing prognostic information and a modality for minimal residual disease evaluation.

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