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Von Mehren M.,Chase Medical | Rankin C.,Southwest Oncology Group | Goldblum J.R.,Cleveland Clinic | Demetri G.D.,Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | And 5 more authors.
Cancer | Year: 2012

BACKGROUND: Patients with advanced soft tissue sarcomas (STS) have limited therapeutic options. Sorafenib (BAY 43-9006) is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor of raf, vascular endothelial growth factor receptors 1 (VEGFR1) through 3, platelet-derived growth factor B, fms-like tyrosine kinase 3, and c-kit, and some of these may be relevant in STS. METHODS: The authors tested sorafenib at a dose of 400 mg twice daily in patients with advanced vascular sarcoma (VS), high-grade liposarcomas, and leiomyosarcomas who had received 0 or 1 previous regimens for advanced disease. RESULTS: Fifty-one patients were accrued to the study, and 37 were evaluable for toxicity and response. There were no unexpected side effects and no confirmed responses. The median progression-free survival was 3 months, and the median overall survival was 17 months. Six of 8 patients in the VS cohort had prolonged clinical benefit (stable disease or better), resulting in a median progression-free survival of 5 months compared with 2 to 3 months for the patients who had liposarcoma and leiomyosarcomas. CONCLUSIONS: Sorafenib at the dose and schedule studied did not result in any responses in the VS, liposarcoma, or leiomyosarcoma cohort according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. © 2011 American Cancer Society. Source


Ludwig H.,Center for Oncology and Hematology | Durie B.G.M.,Southwest Oncology Group | McCarthy P.,Roswell Park Cancer Institute | Palumbo A.,University of Turin | And 23 more authors.
Blood | Year: 2012

Maintaining results of successful induction therapy is an important goal in multiple myeloma. Here, members of the International Myeloma Working Group review the relevant data. Thalidomide maintenance therapy after autologous stem cell transplantation improved the quality of response and increased progression-free survival (PFS) significantly in all 6 studies and overall survival (OS) in 3 of them. In elderly patients, 2 trials showed a significant prolongation of PFS, but no improvement in OS. A meta-analysis revealed a significant risk reduction for PFS/eventfree survival and death. The role of thalidomide maintenance after melphalan, prednisone, and thalidomide is not well established. Two trials with lenalidomide maintenance treatment after autologous stem cell transplantation and one study after conventional melphalan, prednisone, and lenalidomide induction therapy showed a significant risk reduction for PFS and an increase in OS in one of the transplant trials. Maintenance therapy with single-agent bortezomib or in combination with thalidomide or prednisone has been studied. One trial revealed a significantly increased OS with a bortezomib-based induction and bortezomib maintenance therapy compared with conventional induction and thalidomide maintenance treatment. Maintenance treatment can be associated with significant side effects, and none of the drugs evaluated is approved for maintenance therapy. Treatment decisions for individual patients must balance potential benefits and risks carefully, as a widely agreed-on standard is not established. Source


Ramanathan R.K.,Arizona Cancer Center | Ramanathan R.K.,Virginia per Cancer Center | McDonough S.L.,Southwest Oncology Group | Kennecke H.F.,British Columbia Cancer Agency | And 8 more authors.
Cancer | Year: 2015

BACKGROUND The AKT inhibitor MK-2206 at a dose of 60 mg every other day was evaluated in gastric/gastroesophageal junction cancers. METHODS Patients who had progressed after first-line treatment were eligible. Pertinent eligibility criteria included adequate organ function, a fasting serum glucose level ≤ 150 mg/dL, and less than grade 2 malabsorption or chronic diarrhea. MK-2206 was given orally (60 evaluable patients required). The primary endpoint was overall survival, and a median survival of 6.5 months (power, 89%; significance level, 0.07) was considered encouraging for further investigation. RESULTS Seventy patients were included in the final analyses. The median age was 59.8 years (range, 30.4-86.7 years); 70% were male, 89% were white, and 7% were Asian. There were 2 deaths possibly related to the study drug (cardiac arrest and respiratory failure). Grade 4 adverse events included hyperglycemia, anemia, and lung infection (1 each). Grade 3 adverse events occurred in < 5% of patients except for fatigue (6%). Other adverse events (all grades) included anemia (17%), anorexia (30%), diarrhea (26%), fatigue (50%), hyperglycemia (30%), nausea (40%), vomiting (22%), dry skin (19%), maculopapular rash (30%), and acneiform rash (13%). The response rate was 1%, the median progression-free survival was 1.8 months (95% confidence interval, 1.7-1.8 months), and the median overall survival was 5.1 months (95% confidence interval, 3.7-9.4 months) CONCLUSIONS MK-2206 as second-line therapy was well tolerated by an unselected group of patients with gastric/gastroesophageal junction cancers, but it did not have sufficient activity (response rate, 1%; overall survival, 5.1 months) to warrant further testing in this population. Cancer 2015;121:2193-2197. © 2015 American Cancer Society. Source


Yothers G.,N-of-One | Yothers G.,University of Pittsburgh | Sargent D.J.,Mayo Clinic Cancer Center | Sargent D.J.,North Central Cancer Treatment Group | And 13 more authors.
Journal of the National Cancer Institute | Year: 2011

Conclusion Background Among patients with resected colon cancer, black patients have worse survival than whites. We investigated whether disparities in survival and related endpoints would persist when patients were treated with identical therapies in controlled clinical trials.Conclusion Methods We assessed 14611 patients (1218 black and 13393 white) who received standardized adjuvant treatment in 12 randomized controlled clinical trials conducted in North America for resected stage II and stage III colon cancer between 1977 and 2002. Individual patient data on covariates and outcomes were extracted from the Adjuvant Colon Cancer ENdpoinTs (ACCENT) database. The endpoints examined in this meta-analysis were overall survival (time to death), recurrence-free survival (time to recurrence or death), and recurrence-free interval (time to recurrence). Cox models were stratified by study and controlled for sex, stage, age, and treatment to determine the effect of race. Kaplan-Meier estimates were adjusted for similar covariates to control for confounding. All statistical tests were two-sided.Conclusion Results Black patients were younger than whites (median age, 58 vs 61 years, respectively; P <. 001) and more likely to be female (55% vs 45%, respectively; P <. 001). Overall survival was worse in black patients than whites (hazard ratio [HR] of death = 1.22, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.11 to 1.34, P <. 001). Five-year overall survival rates for blacks and whites were 68.2% and 72.8%, respectively. When subsets defined by sex, stage, and age were analyzed, overall survival was consistently worse in black patients. Recurrence-free survival was worse in black patients than whites (HR of recurrence or death = 1.14, 95% CI = 1.04 to 1.24, P =. 0045). Three-year recurrence-free survival rates in blacks and whites were 68.4% and 72.1%, respectively. In contrast, recurrence-free interval was similar in black and white patients (HR of recurrence = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.97 to 1.19, P =. 15). Three-year recurrence-free interval rates in blacks and whites were 71.3% and 74.2%, respectively.Conclusion Conclusion sBlack patients with resected stage II and stage III colon cancer who were treated with the same therapy as white patients experienced worse overall and recurrence-free survival, but similar recurrence-free interval, compared with white patients. The differences in survival may be mostly because of factors unrelated to the patients' adjuvant colon cancer treatment. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. Source


Swain S.M.,The Surgical Center | Swain S.M.,Washington Cancer Institute | Jeong J.-H.,University of Pittsburgh | Geyer Jr. C.E.,The Surgical Center | And 26 more authors.
New England Journal of Medicine | Year: 2010

BACKGROUND: Chemotherapy regimens that combine anthracyclines and taxanes result in improved disease-free and overall survival among women with operable lymph-node-positive breast cancer. The effectiveness of concurrent versus sequential regimens is not known. METHODS: We randomly assigned 5351 patients with operable, node-positive, early-stage breast cancer to receive four cycles of doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by four cycles of docetaxel (sequential ACT); four cycles of doxorubicin and docetaxel (doxorubicin- docetaxel); or four cycles of doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, and docetaxel (concurrent ACT). The primary aims were to examine whether concurrent ACT was more effective than sequential ACT and whether the doxorubicin-docetaxel regimen would be as effective as the concurrent-ACT regimen. The secondary aims were to assess toxic effects and to correlate amenorrhea with outcomes in premenopausal women. Results: At a median follow-up of 73 months, overall survival was improved in the sequential-ACT group (8-year overall survival, 83%) as compared with the doxorubicin-docetaxel group (overall survival, 79%; hazard ratio for death, 0.83; P = 0.03) and the concurrent-ACT group (overall survival, 79%; hazard ratio, 0.86; P = 0.09). Disease-free survival was improved in the sequential-ACT group (8-year disease-free survival, 74%) as compared with the doxorubicin-docetaxel group (disease-free survival, 69%; hazard ratio for recurrence, a second malignant condition, or death, 0.80; P = 0.001) and the concurrent-ACT group (disease-free survival, 69%; hazard ratio, 0.83; P = 0.01). The doxorubicin-docetaxel regimen showed noninferiority to the concurrent-ACT regimen for overall survival (hazard ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.82 to 1.14). Overall survival was improved in patients with amenorrhea for 6 months or more across all treatment groups, independently of estrogen-receptor status. CONCLUSIONS: Sequential ACT improved disease-free survival as compared with doxorubicin-docetaxel or concurrent ACT, and it improved overall survival as compared with doxorubicin-docetaxel. Amenorrhea was associated with improved survival regardless of the treatment and estrogen-receptor status. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00003782.). Copyright © 2010 Massachusetts Medical Society. Source

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