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Bommineni Y.R.,Southwest National Primate Research Center at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research | Dick Jr E.J.,Southwest National Primate Research Center at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research | Malapati A.R.,Texas AgriLife Research Center | Owston M.A.,Southwest National Primate Research Center at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Medical Primatology | Year: 2011

Background Baboons are useful animal models for biomedical research, but the natural pathology of the baboon is not as well defined as other non-human primates. Methods A computer search for all morphologic diagnoses from baboon necropsies at the Southwest National Primate Research Center was performed and included all the natural deaths and animals euthanized for natural causes. Results A total of 10,883 macroscopic or microscopic morphologic diagnoses in 4297 baboons were documented and are presented by total incidence, relative incidence by sex and age-group, and mean age of occurrence. The most common diagnoses in descending order of occurrence were hemorrhage, stillborn, amyloidosis, colitis, spondylosis, and pneumonia. The systems with the most diagnoses were the digestive, urogenital, musculoskeletal, and respiratory. Conclusion This extensive evaluation of the natural pathology of the baboon should be an invaluable biomedical research resource. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Source


Slingluff J.L.,Western University of Health Sciences | Williams J.T.,Southwest National Primate Research Center at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research | Blau L.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | Blau A.,University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Medical Primatology | Year: 2010

Background: Gallbladder pathology (GBP) is a relatively uncommon, naturally occurring morbidity in both baboons and humans. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 7776 necropsy reports over a 20 year period to determine the prevalence of baboon GBP. Results: Ninety-seven cases of GBP were identified, yielding a 20 year population prevalence of 1.25%. GBP is more common in adult female baboons, occurring with a female to male ratio of nearly 2:1. Among gallbladder pathologies, cholecystitis (35.1%) and cholelithiasis (29.9%) were the most prevalent abnormalities, followed by hyperplasia (16.5%), edema (15.5%), amyloidosis (5.2%), fibrosis (4.1%), necrosis (4.1%), and hemorrhage (1.0%). Conclusion: Many epidemiologic similarities exist between GBP in baboons and humans suggesting that the baboon may serve as a reliable animal model system for investigating GBP in humans. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Source

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