Kunming, China

Southwest Forestry University , SWFU, is a specialist forestry university located in Kunming City, Yunnan Province, China. Wikipedia.


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Agency: Cordis | Branch: FP7 | Program: CSA-CA | Phase: NMP-2008-2.6-3 | Award Amount: 2.04M | Year: 2009

A coordination action is proposed to reinforce the international dimension of EU research on nanomaterials in formulations in the Asia-Pasific region. Three mechanism will be implemented to reach the widest possible audience in the appropriate formats that are convenient to the different stakeholders: (1) yearly major events, that will introduce a new concept to scientific gatherings and a departure from conventional meetings, (2) a researchers exchange program to seed new collaborations, facilitate joint projects and the realisation of future coordinated calls, and (3) the creation of a website devoted to nanomaterials in formulations, that will include up to date and reliable information on the newest research developments, funding opportunities, regulations, events and links to other nanotechnology initiatives.


Luo Y.,CAS Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden | Guo Z.,Plant Germplasm and Genomics Center | Li L.,Southwest forestry University
Developmental Biology | Year: 2013

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulators of growth and development in both plants and animals. Flowering is critical for the reproduction of angiosperms. Flower development entails the transition from vegetative growth to reproductive growth, floral organ initiation, and the development of floral organs. These developmental processes are genetically regulated by miRNAs, which participate in complex genetic networks of flower development. A survey of the literature shows that miRNAs, their specific targets, and the regulatory programs in which they participate are conserved throughout the plant kingdom. This review summarizes the role of miRNAs and their targets in the regulation of gene expression during the floral developmental phase, which includes the floral transition stage, followed by floral patterning, and then the development of floral organs. The conservation patterns observed in each component of the miRNA regulatory system suggest that these miRNAs play important roles in the evolution of flower development. © 2013 Elsevier Inc.


Li X.,Southwest forestry University | Deng S.,Southwest forestry University | Fu H.,Southwest forestry University
Corrosion Science | Year: 2011

The inhibition effect of triazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide (TBTB) on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 1.0M HCl and 0.5M H2SO4 solution was investigated for the first time by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization curves, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) methods. The results show that TBTB is a very good inhibitor, and is more efficiency in 1.0M HCl than 0.5M H2SO4. The adsorption of TBTB on CRS surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Polarization curves reveal that TBTB acts as a mixed-type inhibitor in both acids. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Liu Y.,Southwest forestry University
Plant Cell Reports | Year: 2012

Abscisic acid (ABA) is a universal hormone in higher plants and plays a major role in various aspects of plant stress, growth, and development. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are key signaling modules for responding to various extracellular stimuli in plants. The available data suggest that MAPK cascades are involved in some ABA responses, including antioxidant defense, guard cell signaling, and seed germination. Some MAPK phosphatases have also been demonstrated to be implicated in ABA responses. The goal of this review is to piece together the findings concerning MAPK cascades in ABA signaling. Questions and further perspectives of the roles played by MAPK cascades in ABA signaling are also furnished. © 2011 Springer-Verlag.


The effect of typical wood composite preservatives, ammonium pentaborate (APB), nanosize copper oxide and basic copper carbonate, on the cure characteristics of phenol formaldehyde (PF) resin in the presence of wood was evaluated by solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance with cross-polarization and magic angle spinning (CP/MAS). With the introduction of APB the absorption intensity and peak area of PF resin at 129.5 ppm was reduced, and the carbons in methylene bridges shifted from 65.8 to 73.5 ppm, which were the result of hydrogen bond formation between ammonium in APB and oxygen of phenolic hydroxyl, as well as coordination bond between the boron in APB and oxygen in phenolic hydroxyl and/or unreacted hydroxymethyl. In addition, the peak area at 152.7 ppm increased with the addition of poplar powder for the overlap of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin chemical shifts with the active groups in PF resin. However, the connection status of critically active chemical groups of condensed polymer structure in cured PF resin such as the existence of phenolic ring, phenolic hydroxyl, methylene bridges, and hydroxymethyl linkage are unchanged. Combined with relative increase in the amount of carbon in methylene bridges from 2.42 to 2.56, drop in number of carbons of unreacted hydroxyls from 1.19 to 1.07, and the reported increase in physical and mechanical properties, the nanosize copper oxide improved the curing degree of PF. Furthermore, the similar analysis indicated that basic copper carbonate delayed the curing degree of PF. © Iran Polymer and Petrochemical Institute 2012.


Allendorf T.D.,University of Wisconsin - Madison | Yang J.,Southwest forestry University
Biological Conservation | Year: 2013

Finding common ground between local residents' livelihoods and the conservation of protected areas in developing countries has been considered a challenge. Recently, ecosystem services have been used as a framework to understand the benefits that protected areas provide local residents. In this study, we explore the role of ecosystem services in residents' relationships with Gaoligongshan Nature Reserve (GNR) in Yunnan, China. GNR is located in a biodiversity hotspot and in an area that has been affected severe droughts. Results show that the majority of people recognize ecosystem services as benefits from GNR, particularly regulating services such as the provision of water. Respondents who perceived regulating services were more likely to be older, male, of Yi ethnicity, more educated, and grow sugarcane but not corn. However, controlling for residents' knowledge about GNR, the effects of gender, age, and education decrease or disappear, while ethnicity and agricultural crops grown remain significant. This study demonstrates that people recognize common ground between their livelihoods and GNR and suggests that people's knowledge about GNR, cultural context, and agricultural experiences influence their appreciation of ecosystem services from GNR. This study highlights that protected area conservation, if conducted with awareness of people's already-existing perceptions of benefits, can begin with a discussion of win-win scenarios. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.


Li X.,Southwest forestry University | Deng S.,Southwest forestry University
Corrosion Science | Year: 2012

The inhibition effect of Dendrocalamus brandisii leaves extract (DBLE) on the corrosion of aluminum in HCl, H 3PO 4 solutions was studied by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. Effects of temperature, immersion time and acid concentration on corrosion inhibition were fully discussed. The results show that DBLE is a good inhibitor in 1.0M HCl, while a moderate inhibitor in H 3PO 4. The adsorption of DBLE on aluminum surface obeys Langmuir isotherm in both acids. DBLE acts as a cathodic inhibitor in HCl, while a mixed-type inhibitor in H 3PO 4. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Deng S.,Southwest forestry University | Li X.,Southwest forestry University
Corrosion Science | Year: 2012

The inhibition effect of Ginkgo leaves extract (GLE) on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 1.0-5.0M HCl and 0.5-2.5M H 2SO 4 solutions was investigated for the first time by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. The results show that GLE is a good inhibitor, and exhibits more efficient in 1.0M HCl than 0.5M H 2SO 4. The adsorption of GLE on CRS surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. GLE acts as a mixed-type inhibitor in 1.0M HCl, while a cathodic inhibitor in 0.5M H 2SO 4. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.


Deng S.,Southwest forestry University | Li X.,Southwest forestry University
Corrosion Science | Year: 2012

The inhibition effect of Jasminum nudiflorum Lindl. leaves extract (JNLLE) on the corrosion of aluminium in HCl solution was studied by weight loss, polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) methods. The results show that JNLLE is a good inhibitor in 1.0. M HCl, and the adsorption of JNLLE obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. Effects of immersion time and acid concentration on inhibitive performance were discussed. Polarization curves reveal that JNLLE acts as the cathodic inhibitor. EIS exhibits a large capacitive loop at high frequencies followed by a large inductive one at low frequency values. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


Li X.,Southwest forestry University | Deng S.,Southwest forestry University | Fu H.,Southwest forestry University
Corrosion Science | Year: 2012

The inhibition effect of the bamboo of Dendrocalmus sinicus Chia et J.L. Sun leaf extract (DSCLE) on the corrosion of cold rolled steel (CRS) in 1.0-5.0M HCl, 0.5-5.0M H 2SO 4 solutions was studied by weight loss, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and atomic force microscope (AFM) methods. The results show that DSCLE is a good inhibitor in 1.0M HCl and 0.5M H 2SO 4, and inhibition efficiency follows the order: HCl>H 2SO 4. The adsorption of DSCLE on CRS surface obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm, and acts as a mixed-type inhibitor in both acids. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

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