Central, SC, United States

Southern Wesleyan University

www.swu.edu
Central, SC, United States

Southern Wesleyan University is a four-year and graduate Christian college, with its main campus in Central, South Carolina. The university was founded in 1906 by what is now the Wesleyan Church.The school prepares students for leadership and graduate study in such fields as business, education, religion, music, medicine, law and a variety of civic and social service professions. It offers approximately 35 major areas of study for undergraduates and also offers graduate degrees in the areas of business and education. The university serves approximately 1,900 students. There are more than 600 traditional undergraduates enrolled at the main campus in Central, South Carolina. In addition, undergraduate and graduate programs are offered in a non-traditional, evening format at regional learning centers in Central, Greenville, Columbia, Charleston, North Augusta, Greenwood and Spartanburg. Dr. Todd Voss serves as Southern Wesleyan University's president.The school has 15 intercollegiate athletic teams. In 2007, women's basketball and men's baseball teams won their respective National Christian College Athletic Association national championships. Men's soccer and individual men's golf won NCCAA National Championships in 2013. Wikipedia.

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Daniels B.P.,Southern Wesleyan University | Sestito S.R.,Southern Wesleyan University | Rouse S.T.,Southern Wesleyan University
Parasitology International | Year: 2014

Infection with the neurotropic parasite Toxoplasma gondii is widespread among human populations; however, the impacts of latent central nervous system (CNS) T. gondii infection have only recently come to light. Epidemiological evidence in humans and experimental studies in rodents have revealed a number of neurological and behavioral sequelae following the establishment of latent CNS toxoplasmosis. Here, we report alterations in learning and memory task performance in latently infected rats using the Morris water maze. While simple spatial reference learning was intact, infected rodents exhibited poor performance compared to controls in probe trials requiring spatial memory recall and progressively poorer performance with increasing time intervals before memory testing, but, surprisingly, enhanced performance in reversal learning tasks. Despite obvious changes to memory task performance, no cysts were detected in the hippocampi of infected rats. Instead, cysts were stochastically distributed across the entire brain, suggesting that behavioral alterations in this study were due to accumulated changes in neurophysiology across multiple anatomical regions. Together, these data provide new evidence that latent toxoplasmosis contributes to neurocognitive symptoms in mammalian hosts, and does so on a broad anatomical scale within the CNS. © 2014 Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Stories about sexual violence are flooding the news, but the impact of psychological harm is rarely mentioned. It’s a difficult topic of conversation and one people tend to avoid, but not Nicole Saint-Clair. Saint-Clair wrote her first novel, “Broken Sand Dollar,” which is a memoir detailing her life changing encounter with sexual violence and the trauma it caused, leading to 30 years of unexpected but coincidental confrontations with her aggressors. The novel chronicles Saint-Clair’s experience as she restores the missing pieces. At 19-years-old, Saint-Clair went on a spring break trip, ready to have the time of her life with her closest friends. But she was unaware of the impact it would have on her life for years to come. “I had such a difficult time facing the truth and wanted more than anything for it to just go away,” Saint-Clair said. “So, I started writing as therapy to help me cope, and it was such a freeing experience.” As she reflects on her life and the path to understanding what caused years of trauma, Saint-Clair aims to become an advocate for opening the dialogue among men and women about sexual violence. In “Broken Sand Dollar,” readers will follow Saint-Clair as she shares her difficulties related to the spring break incident that redirected the course of Saint-Clair’s life. About the author The author, who writes under the pen name of Nicole Saint-Clair, is a marketing and advertising professional. Saint-Clair attended the University of South Carolina where she received a bachelor’s degree in journalism. She also has a master’s degree in management from Southern Wesleyan University. Saint-Clair previously served on the board of directors for a rape crisis center for over a decade. After suffering from an episode of PTSD caused by an encounter with sexual violence, she wrote “Broken Sand Dollar.” For more information about Saint-Clair, please visit http://www.nicolesaintclair.com/.


News Article | December 21, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Christmas came early for eight local Upstate charities earlier this month, when The Reserve at Lake Keowee’s Charitable Foundation unveiled a record-breaking total of $141,000 its community raised in 2016 – a 28 percent increase from the Foundation’s 2015 annual gift of $110,000. In the ten years since the Foundation’s inception, it has raised and donated $541,000 to local charities. Representatives from each local charity gathered on Tuesday, December 6, at Founders Hall in The Reserve’s Village for the special announcement and funds disbursement. A Christmas Show with the Southern Wesleyan University Singers followed the charity check presentation. The 2016 beneficiaries of The Reserve at Lake Keowee Charitable Foundation’s annual gift include: “I am so proud of our members for the time, talent, and donations they have given this year,” said Georgia Elley, Chairman of The Reserve at Lake Keowee Charitable Foundation Board of Trustees. “In 2016, we raised a record amount for local charities, money that will help them continue their programming and enhance the quality of life for the families they help.” Four fundraising events throughout the year make the $141,000 gift possible: the BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX, The Reserve at Lake Keowee’s 2016 Charity Golf Classic and Auction, the community’s Garden Club Home Tour, and its Swine and Dine Dinner & Auction. Milledge Cassell, Chairman of the Board of Directors for Feed a Hungry Child, described this as the “biggest donation we’ve ever gotten from an individual, organization or grant.” In terms of the level of impact this gift will have on the organization’s ability to serve out its mission, Cassell said that this one contribution would be the equivalent of feeding more than 600 children each week for nearly three months straight. Ripple of One’s Executive Director, Stephanie Enders, stated “We are so grateful to be a recipient of The Reserve’s Foundation. This funding will be utilized for monthly rewards, a savings match and paid internships – which ultimately move our families into lives of independence.” Non-profit charitable organizations may apply by November 30 each year via The Reserve at Lake Keowee’s website at http://www.ReserveatLakeKeowee.com to be considered as a beneficiary for the following year. The Foundation’s Outreach Committee reviews applications, and all members of The Reserve at Lake Keowee vote upon a vetted list of finalists. Selected beneficiaries are notified in February, and The Reserve disburses funds in December. About The Reserve at Lake Keowee Community and Charitable Foundations The Reserve at Lake Keowee Community Foundation is a non-profit organization created to enhance the quality of life at The Reserve and in the local area while fulfilling a sense of community and philanthropy for The Reserve’s members. The Community Foundation sponsors regular cultural events, including concerts, plays, lectures, and an Artist in Residence. The Foundation has four major functions: 1.) Help preserve the area’s natural resources through environmental stewardship; 2.) Provide educational programs for The Reserve’s members and guests; 3.) Promote an arts program at The Reserve; and 4.) Provide outreach activities for neighboring communities in Pickens County, S.C., through The Reserve at Lake Keowee’s 501(c)(3) Charitable Foundation. About The Reserve at Lake Keowee Created in 2000 by Greenwood Communities and Resorts, The Reserve at Lake Keowee is an award-winning residential community that spans 3,900 acres in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, with 30 miles of shoreline on Lake Keowee and convenient access to nationally-recognized commercial and cultural centers that include Greenville, S.C.; Asheville, N.C.; and Clemson and Furman Universities. A 200-slip Marina, Village Center, Jack Nicklaus Signature Golf Course, and more than 1,400 acres of parks, preserves, trails, and green spaces highlight more than $100 million in completed family amenities at The Reserve. The Reserve has approximately 700 members from 30 different states. Homesites at The Reserve are available from the $100,000s to $950,000s; homes from $500,000 to $3 million. To learn more, call 877-922-LAKE (5253), visit http://www.ReserveAtLakeKeowee.com or read the community’s official blog at LifeOnKeowee. Real Estate Scorecard writes unbiased real estate reviews providing in-depth information about popular gated communities in Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas, Tennessee and Central America, all in an effort to help people discover where to retire in the South.


Hedetniemi S.M.,Clemson University | Hedetniemi S.T.,Clemson University | Jiang H.,Clemson University | Kennedy K.E.,Southern Wesleyan University | McRae A.A.,Appalachian State University
Information Processing Letters | Year: 2012

The efficiency of a set S⊆V in a graph G=(V,E), is defined as ε(S)=|{vεV-S:|N(v)∩>S|=1}|; in other words, the efficiency of a set S equals the number of vertices in V-S that are adjacent to exactly one vertex in S. A set S is called optimally efficient if for every vertex vεV-S, ε(S∪{v})≤ε(S), and for every vertex uεS, ε(S-{u})<ε(S). We present a polynomial time self-stabilizing algorithm for finding an optimally efficient set in an arbitrary graph. This algorithm is designed using the distance-2 self-stabilizing model of computation. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


Hedetniemi S.M.,Clemson University | Hedetniemi S.T.,Clemson University | Kennedy K.E.,Southern Wesleyan University | McRae A.A.,Appalachian State University
Parallel Processing Letters | Year: 2013

An unfriendly partition is a partition of the vertices of a graph G = (V,E) into two sets, say Red R(V) and Blue B(V), such that every Red vertex has at least as many Blue neighbors as Red neighbors, and every Blue vertex has at least as many Red neighbors as Blue neighbors. We present three polynomial time, self-stabilizing algorithms for finding unfriendly partitions in arbitrary graphs G, or equivalently into two disjoint dominating sets. © 2013 World Scientific Publishing Company.


Yang X.,Clemson University | Tietje A.H.,Southern Wesleyan University | Yu X.,Clemson University | Wei Y.,Clemson University
International Journal of Oncology | Year: 2016

Whereas cancer immunotherapy with cytokines in recent research was demonstrated effective in activating immune response against tumor cells, one major obstacle with the use of these cytokines is their severe side effects when delivered systemically at high doses. Another challenge is that advanced tumor cells often evade immunosurveillance of the immune system as well as of the Fas-mediated apoptosis by various mechanisms. We report the design and preliminary evaluation of the antitumor activity of a novel fusion protein-mIL-12/FasTI, consisting of mouse interleukin-12 and the transmembrane and intracellular domains of mouse Fas. The fusion construct (pmIL-12/FasTI) was transfected into mouse lung carcinoma cell line TC-1. Stable cell clones expressing the fusion protein were established as assayed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. ELISA and cell proliferation analyses demonstrated that NK cells were effectively activated by the fusion protein with increased IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity. Enhanced caspase-3 activity of the clones when co-cultured with NK cells indicated that apoptosis was induced through Fas/FasL signaling pathway. The preliminary results suggest a synergized anticancer activity of the fusion protein. It may represent a promising therapeutic agent for cancer treatment.


Hedetniemi S.T.,Clemson University | Jacobs D.P.,Clemson University | Kennedy K.E.,Southern Wesleyan University | Kennedy K.E.,BMW AG
Theoretical Computer Science | Year: 2015

A theorem of Ore [20] states that if D is a minimal dominating set in a graph G=(V, E) having no isolated nodes, then V-D is a dominating set. It follows that such graphs must have two disjoint minimal dominating sets R and B. We describe a self-stabilizing algorithm for finding such a pair of sets. It also follows from Ore's theorem that in a graph with no isolates, one can find disjoint sets R and B where R is maximal independent and B is minimal dominating. We describe a self-stabilizing algorithm for finding such a pair. Both algorithms are described using the Distance-2 model, but can be converted to the usual Distance-1 model [7], yielding running times of O(n2m). © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


Health-care professionals currently have the right to conscientiously object to any procedure that they deem as morally illicit or that, in their opinion, could harm the patient. However, the right of conscientious refusal in medicine is currently under severe scrutiny. Medical procedures such as abortion and physicianassisted suicide that are not commonly medically indicated, but that can be requested by the patient, represent a type of medical care that is the penultimate expression of patient autonomy. When a health-care provider exercises his or her conscience in a way that denies the patient immediate access to such procedures, many claim that patient autonomy has been oppressed by the religious convictions of the health-care professional. As such, there is a growing opposition to the protection of conscience rights in health care that deserves attention. A common strategy used to defend conscience rights has been to claim that under the United States Bill of Rights, the health-care professional must be allowed to exercise their religious liberties in the context of their profession. This rationale seems to ignite a more intense opposition to conscience rights as it seems to validate the sense that a health-care professional's religious convictions are protected at the cost of patient autonomy. This paper reviews the current status of this debate and proposes a defense of conscience rights in health care that considers both the autonomy of the health-care worker and that of the patient in the context of the patient-physician relationship. © 2012 by the Catholic Medical Association. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Clemson University and Southern Wesleyan University
Type: | Journal: Oncology reports | Year: 2017

Natural killer (NK) cells have the potential to be effective killers of tumor cells. They are governed by inhibitory and activating receptors such as NKG2D, whose ligands are normally upregulated in cells that are stressed, like cancer cells. Advanced cancer cells, however, have ways to reduce the expression of these ligands, leaving them less detectable by NK cells. Along with these receptors, NK cells also require activating cytokines, such as IL-12. A previous study in our laboratory showed that a fusion protein of the extracellular domain of mouse UL-16 binding protein-like transcript 1 (MULT1E) and mouse interleukin 12 (IL-12) can effectively activate mouse NK cells by invitro assays and invivo in animal tumor models. The aim of the present study was to expand the concept of developing a novel bifunctional fusion protein for enhanced NK cell activation to human killer cells. The proposed protein combines the extracellular domain of a human NKG2D ligand, MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A (MICA) and IL-12. It is hypothesized that when expressed by tumor cells, the protein will activate human NK and other killer cells using the NKG2D receptor, and deliver IL-12 to the NK cells where it can interact with the IL-12R and enhance cytotoxicity. The fusion protein, when expressed by engineered tumor cells, indeed activated NK92 cells as measured by an increase in interferon- (IFN-) production and an increase in cytotoxicity of tumor cells. The fusion protein was also able to increase the proliferation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and augment their production of IFN-. This study along with the data from the previous mouse studies suggest that the MICA/IL-12 bifunctional fusion protein represents an effective activator of killer cells for cancer treatment.


PubMed | Clemson University and Southern Wesleyan University
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International journal of oncology | Year: 2016

Whereas cancer immunotherapy with cytokines in recent research was demonstrated effective in activating immune response against tumor cells, one major obstacle with the use of these cytokines is their severe side effects when delivered systemically at high doses. Another challenge is that advanced tumor cells often evade immunosurveillance of the immune system as well as of the Fas-mediated apoptosis by various mechanisms. We report the design and preliminary evaluation of the antitumor activity of a novel fusion protein-mIL-12/FasTI, consisting of mouse interleukin-12 and the transmembrane and intracellular domains of mouse Fas. The fusion construct (pmIL-12/FasTI) was transfected into mouse lung carcinoma cell line TC-1. Stable cell clones expressing the fusion protein were established as assayed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. ELISA and cell proliferation analyses demonstrated that NK cells were effectively activated by the fusion protein with increased IFN- production and cytotoxicity. Enhanced caspase-3 activity of the clones when co-cultured with NK cells indicated that apoptosis was induced through Fas/FasL signaling pathway. The preliminary results suggest a synergized anticancer activity of the fusion protein. It may represent a promising therapeutic agent for cancer treatment.

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