USFS Southern Research Station

NC, United States

USFS Southern Research Station

NC, United States
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Schuler J.,West Virginia University | Bragg D.C.,USFS Southern Research Station | McElligott K.,Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
Forest Science | Year: 2017

As southern pine forests (both planted and naturally regenerated) are more heavily used to provide biomass for the developing energy sectors and carbon sequestration, a better understanding of models used to characterize regional biomass estimates is needed. We harvested loblolly pines (Pinus taeda L.) between 0.5 and 15 cm dbh from several plantations and naturally regenerated stands in southeastern Arkansas to evaluate allometric relationships based on stand origin. In this process, each pine was separated into stemwood, branches + foliage, and taproot biomass components. Although the differences changed with dbh, loblolly pines from planted stands generally had greater percentages of biomass allocated to foliage + branches and taproots, whereas those from natural-origin stands had greater amounts in stemwood, aboveground, and total biomass. National Biomass Estimator (NBE) high-specific gravity pine equations predicted natural-origin aboveground biomass reasonably well. However, the same NBE model underpredicted aboveground biomass for small (+5 cm) diameter planted pine and overpredicted planted pines between 7 and 15 cm dbh. When scaled to stand-level estimates, the NBE models resulted in estimates for average stand diameters of 5, 10, and 15 cm that ranged from +18.6 to 2.1% for natural stands and from +21.9 to 62.8% for planted stands. © 2017 Society of American Foresters.


Jones J.A.,Oregon State University | Creed I.F.,University of Western Ontario | Hatcher K.L.,Oregon State University | Adams M.B.,Us Forest Service Usfs Northern Research Station | And 19 more authors.
BioScience | Year: 2012

Analyses of long-term records at 35 headwater basins in the United States and Canada indicate that climate change effects on streamflow are not as clear as might be expected, perhaps because of ecosystem processes and human influences. Evapotranspiration was higher than was predicted by temperature in water-surplus ecosystems and lower than was predicted in water-deficit ecosystems. Streamflow was correlated with climate variability indices (e.g., the El Niño-Southern Oscillation, the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, the North Atlantic Oscillation), especially in seasons when vegetation influences are limited. Air temperature increased significantly at 17 of the 19 sites with 20-to 60-year records, but streamflow trends were directly related to climate trends (through changes in ice and snow) at only 7 sites. Past and present human and natural disturbance, vegetation succession, and human water use can mimic, exacerbate, counteract, or mask the effects of climate change on streamflow, even in reference basins. Long-term ecological research sites are ideal places to disentangle these processes. © 2012 by American Institute of Biological Sciences. All rights reserved.

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